Lady Maiko

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Lady Maiko
Lady Maiko poster.jpeg
Poster
舞妓はレディ
Directed by Masayuki Suo
Written byMasayuki Suo
Starring Mone Kamishiraishi
Hiroki Hasegawa
Sumiko Fuji
Music by Yoshikazu Suo
Cinematography Rokuro Terada
Edited by Junichi Kikuchi
Distributed by Toho
Release date
  • June 16, 2014 (2014-06-16)(SIFF)
  • September 13, 2014 (2014-09-13)(Japan)
Running time
134 minutes
CountryJapan
LanguageJapanese

Lady Maiko (舞妓はレディ, Maiko wa Lady) is a 2014 Japanese musical comedy film written and directed by Masayuki Suo, starring Mone Kamishiraishi, Hiroki Hasegawa, and Sumiko Fuji. It screened in competition at the 2014 Shanghai International Film Festival on June 16, 2014. [1] It was released in Japan on September 13, 2014. [1]

Contents

Cast

Reception

Elizabeth Kerr of The Hollywood Reporter commented that "[Masayuki Suo] brings the same light, optimistic touch to bear as he did with his best known films, Sumo Do, Sumo Don't and Shall We Dance? , which similarly revolved around gently non-conformist characters doing (and enjoying) what they shouldn’t in rigid Japan." [2]

Derek Elley of Film Business Asia wrote: "With no romance between pupil and master, the film lacks a strong emotional arc to involve an audience; in its place is just Haruko's own story of wanting to become a geisha, and here Kamishiraishi's performance as the underdog who eventually triumphs manages to carry the day." [1] Mark Shilling of The Japan Times gave the film 3 and a half stars out of 5, saying, "Kamishiraishi, the 16-year-old newcomer who beat out 800 other aspirants for the lead role, is a diminutive vocal dynamo and a good fit as the country-girl heroine, right down to her native Kagoshima dialect." [3]

Kwenton Bellette of Twitch Film felt that "[the] beautiful tourist-baiting scenes of Kyoto and the geisha district are brought to vivid life thanks to the detail-laden environment and costume design although the film contains itself to one tea-house through the majority of its length." [4] Maggie Lee of Variety wrote: "Craft contributions are aces, the richly costumed and decorated production presenting Kyoto's landscaped gardens, seasonal scenery and architecture to most pleasing effect." [5]

It debuted at number 5 at the Japanese box office on its opening weekend, earning $1 million from 91,800 admissions. [6]

Awards

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Elley, Derek (June 22, 2014). "Lady Maiko 舞妓はレディ". Film Business Asia . Retrieved March 1, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. Kerr, Elizabeth (June 18, 2014). "'Lady Maiko': Shanghai Review". The Hollywood Reporter . Retrieved March 1, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. Schilling, Mark (September 17, 2014). "'My Fair Lady' wrapped in a geisha's kimono". The Japan Times . Retrieved March 1, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. Bellette, Kwenton (December 2, 2014). "Japan Film Festival 2014 Review: LADY MAIKO Is A Languidly Lyrical Linguistic Lark". Twitch Film . Retrieved March 1, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. Lee, Maggie (June 19, 2014). "Film Review: 'Lady Maiko'". Variety . Retrieved March 1, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. Schilling, Mark (September 16, 2014). "Japanese Box Office: 'Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends' Rules". Variety . Retrieved March 1, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. 2014年毎日映画コンクール 日本映画大賞は「私の男」. Sports Nippon (in Japanese). January 21, 2015. Retrieved March 1, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. 「永遠の0」作品賞など8冠...日本アカデミー賞. Yomiuri Shimbun (in Japanese). February 27, 2015. Retrieved March 1, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)