Lake Conway

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Lake Conway
Lake Conway Sunset, Faulkner County, AR.jpg
Location Faulkner County, Arkansas,
United States
Coordinates 35°00′19″N92°23′32″W / 35.0053°N 92.3921°W / 35.0053; -92.3921 Coordinates: 35°00′19″N92°23′32″W / 35.0053°N 92.3921°W / 35.0053; -92.3921
Type reservoir
Primary inflows Stone Dam Creek, Palarm Creek, Panther Creek, Little Cypress Creek, Gold Creek
Basin  countries United States
Max. length 8 mi (13 km)
Surface area 6,700 acres (27 km2)
Average depth 6 ft (2 m)
Max. depth 18 ft (5 m)

Lake Conway, a 6,700-acre (27 km2) lake in Arkansas, is the largest reservoir made by a game and fish commission in the United States. It is located just a few miles southeast of Conway, Arkansas.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Reservoir A storage space for fluids

A reservoir is, most commonly, an enlarged natural or artificial lake, pond or impoundment created using a dam or lock to store water.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Contents

Overview

Construction on Lake Conway began in 1948, with water fed by Stone Dam Creek, Palarm Creek, Panther Creek, Little Cypress Creek and Gold Creek. Lake Conway is on average 6 feet (2 m) deep, and is 18 feet (5 m) at the deepest.

Lake Conway Dam is an earthen structure still owned by the Arkansas Fish and Game Commission, 16 feet high and impounding a maximum capacity of 40,200 acre-feet. [1] The lake is approximately 8 miles (13 km) in length, and has approximately 52 miles (84 km) of shoreline. Lake Conway is a popular fishing destination. The lake is full of bass, catfish, bream and crappie. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission maintains many free public areas on the lake, and boat rentals can be found on many commercial docks. The official name of the lake was changed in June 2011 to Craig D. Campbell Lake Conway Reservoir.

Bass is a name shared by many species of fish. The term encompasses both freshwater and marine species, all belonging to the large order Perciformes, or perch-like fishes. The word bass comes from Middle English bars, meaning "perch".

Catfish order of fishes

Catfish are a diverse group of ray-finned fish. Named for their prominent barbels, which resemble a cat's whiskers, catfish range in size and behavior from the three largest species alive, the Mekong giant catfish from Southeast Asia, the wels catfish of Eurasia and the piraíba of South America, to detritivores, and even to a tiny parasitic species commonly called the candiru, Vandellia cirrhosa. There are armour-plated types and there are also naked types, neither having scales. Despite their name, not all catfish have prominent barbels. Members of the Siluriformes order are defined by features of the skull and swimbladder. Catfish are of considerable commercial importance; many of the larger species are farmed or fished for food. Many of the smaller species, particularly the genus Corydoras, are important in the aquarium hobby. Many catfish are nocturnal, but others are crepuscular or diurnal.

Bream species of freshwater and marine fish

Bream ( ) is a species of freshwater and marine fish belonging to a variety of genera including Abramis, Acanthopagrus, Argyrops, Blicca, Brama, Chilotilapia, Etelis, Lepomis, Gymnocranius, Lethrinus, Nemipterus, Pharyngochromis, Rhabdosargus, or Scolopsis.

Mythology

Rumors abound regarding a large "skunk ape" or "Fouke Monster" like creature that inhabits the shallow waters, various islands and numerous inlets around Lake Conway. The Lake Conway Monster hysteria peaked in the 1970s and has declined since then. While no photographs are known to exist of the Lake Conway Monster, reports of large creatures in the lake and strange goings-ons are still reported to this day.[ citation needed ]

The skunk ape, also known as the swamp cabbage man, swamp ape, stink ape, Florida Bigfoot, Louisiana Bigfoot, myakka ape, swampsquatch, and myakka skunk ape, is a humanoid creature said to inhabit the U.S. states of Florida, North Carolina, and Arkansas, although reports from Florida are most common. It is named for its appearance and for the unpleasant odor that is said to accompany it.

In Arkansas folklore, the Fouke Monster is said to have been seen in Fouke in Miller County, Arkansas, during the early 1970s. The creature was accused of attacking a local family. Initial sightings of the creature were concentrated in the Jonesville/Boggy Creek area, where it was blamed for the destruction of local livestock. Later, sightings were made several hundred miles to the north and the east of Fouke.

Environmental Concerns

On March 29, 2013 5,000 barrels of crude oil spilled from the Exxon Pegasus pipeline in Mayflower, Arkansas, putting the lake and wildlife at risk. [2]

2013 Mayflower oil spill

The 2013 Mayflower oil spill occurred on March 29, 2013, when the Pegasus Pipeline, owned by ExxonMobil and carrying Canadian Wabasca heavy crude from the Athabasca oil sands, ruptured in Mayflower, Arkansas, about 25 miles (40 km) northwest of Little Rock releasing about 3,190 barrels of oil. Approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and water mix was recovered. Twenty-two homes were evacuated. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classified the leak as a major spill.

See also

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