Lake District National Park

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Lake District National Park
Keswick Panorama - Oct 2009.jpg
The Skiddaw massif, town of Keswick and Derwent Water seen from Walla Crag
Lake District National Park UK location map.svg
Location United Kingdom (North West England)
Area2,362 km2 (912 sq mi) [1]
Established9 May 1951
Visitors
  • Annual visitors: 16.4 million
  • Annual day visits: 24 million [2]
Governing bodyLake District National Park Authority
Criteria Cultural: ii, v, vi
Reference 422
Inscription2017 (41st Session)
Lake District National Park (shown as number 2) in a map of national parks in England and Wales. National Parks in England and Wales.png
Lake District National Park (shown as number 2) in a map of national parks in England and Wales.

The Lake District National Park is a national park in North West England that includes all of the central Lake District, though the town of Kendal, some coastal areas, and the Lakeland Peninsulas are outside the park boundary.

The area was designated a national park on 9 May 1951 (less than a month after the first UK national park designation — the Peak District). It retained its original boundaries until 2016 when it was extended by 3% in the direction of the Yorkshire Dales National Park to incorporate areas such as land of high landscape value in the Lune Valley. [3]

It is the most visited national park in the United Kingdom with 16.4 million visitors per year and more than 24 million visitor-days per year, [2] the largest of the thirteen national parks in England and Wales, and the second largest in the UK after the Cairngorms National Park. [4] Its aim is to protect the landscape by restricting unwelcome change by industry or commerce. Most of the land in the park is in private ownership, with about 55% registered as agricultural land. Landowners include:

The National Park Authority is based at offices in Kendal. It runs a visitor centre on Windermere at a former country house called Brockhole, [7] Coniston Boating Centre, [8] and Information Centres.

In common with all other national parks in England, there is no restriction on entry to, or movement within the park along public routes, but access to cultivated land is usually restricted to public footpaths, bridleways and byways. Much of the uncultivated land has statutory open access rights, which cover around 50% of the park.

Farmland, settlement and mining have altered the natural scenery, and the ecology has been modified by human influence for millennia and includes important wildlife habitats. Having failed in a previous attempt to gain World Heritage status as a natural World Heritage Site, because of human activities, it was eventually successful in the category of cultural landscape and was awarded the status in 2017. [9]

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The Howgill Fells are hills in Northern England between the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales, lying roughly in between the vertices of a triangle made by the towns of Sedbergh, Kirkby Stephen and Tebay. The name Howgill derives from the Old Norse word haugr meaning a hill or barrow, plus gil meaning a narrow valley.

Coniston, Cumbria Human settlement in England

Coniston is a village and civil parish in the Furness region of Cumbria, England. In the 2001 census the parish had a population of 1,058, decreasing at the 2011 census to 928. Historically part of Lancashire, it is in the southern part of the Lake District National Park, between Coniston Water, the third longest lake in the Lake District, and Coniston Old Man.

Tarn Hows is an area of the Lake District National Park in North West England, It contains a picturesque tarn, approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) northeast of Coniston and about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) northwest of Hawkshead. It is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the area with over half a million visitors per year in the 1970s and is managed by the National Trust.

Dalby Forest Forest in North Yorkshire, England

Dalby Forest is a forest located on the southern slopes of the North York Moors National Park in North Yorkshire, England. It is maintained by Forestry England. Dalby Forest, along with Langdale Forest and Cropton Forest, forms part of the North Riding Forest Park, found within the North York Moors National Park.

Top oSelside

Top o'Selside is a hill in the Lake District in Cumbria, England. At 335 metres (1,099 ft), it is the highest point of the group of hills situated between Coniston Water and Windermere. This group also includes the Wainwright of Black Fell and the summits of Black Brows and Rusland Heights. Top o'Selside lies not in the centre of this region, but in the south-western corner, just outside the forestry plantations of Grizedale Forest and only two-thirds of a mile from the eastern shore of Coniston Water. This large separation from any higher ground gives it enough relative height to make it a Marilyn.

Gayle Mill, North Yorkshire

Gayle Mill, dating from about 1784, is thought to be the oldest structurally unaltered cotton mill in existence. It is located in the Wensleydale hamlet of Gayle, England, 1 mile (2 km) south of the market town of Hawes. It lies within the Yorkshire Dales National Park. The mill is owned by Cultura Trust (formerly known as the North of England Civic Trust ; it was operated by a local volunteer group which paid a modest rent to the owner until March 2018 when the property was closed to enable additional repairs to be undertaken to make it safe for visitors.

Brockhole

The Brockhole Lake District Visitor Centre, also known as the Brockhole National Park Visitor Centre, is a visitor centre and tourist attraction managed by the Lake District National Park Authority. It is situated on the shore of Lake Windermere, roughly equidistant between the towns of Bowness-on-Windermere and Ambleside. It includes the Brockhole house and 30 acres (12 ha) of grounds, including 10 acres (4.0 ha) of formal gardens and an adventure playground. The centre organises a number of activities, including orienteering, kayaking and open water swimming, as well as regular exhibitions.

References

  1. "Lake District facts and figures". Lake District National Park Authority website. Lake District National Park Authority. 24 May 2005. Archived from the original on 19 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  2. 1 2 "National Park facts and figures". nationalparks.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 27 June 2012. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  3. "Yorkshire Dales and Lake District national parks extend". BBC News. 1 August 2016. Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  4. "Lake District National Park – Home page". Lakedistrict.gov.uk. 6 April 2005. Retrieved 21 April 2010.
  5. "The state of farming and land management in the Lake District" (PDF). lakedistrict.gov.uk. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  6. "Forestry Commission Cumbria" (PDF). forestry.gov.uk.
  7. "Brockhole" . Retrieved 22 June 2012.
  8. "Coniston Boating Centre". Lake District National Park.
  9. "English Lake District welcomed into UK UNESCO family as 31st UK World Heritage Site". unesco.org.uk. 9 July 2017. Archived from the original on 7 August 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2017.