Lake Ouachita

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Lake Ouachita
Lake Ouachita (1580678324).jpg
Location Garland and Montgomery counties, Arkansas
Coordinates 34°36′N93°20′W / 34.600°N 93.333°W / 34.600; -93.333 Coordinates: 34°36′N93°20′W / 34.600°N 93.333°W / 34.600; -93.333
Type Hydo-Electric Reservoir
Primary inflows Ouachita River
Primary outflows Ouachita River
Basin  countriesUnited States
Surface area40,000 acres (16,000 ha)
Average depthAvg 50 ft (15 m)
Max. depth200 ft (61 m)
Shore length1690 mi (1,110 km)
FrozenDoes not freeze
Islands 200
SettlementsHotSprings
1 Shore length is not a well-defined measure.

Lake Ouachita (Pronounced WAH-shi-tah) is a reservoir created by the damming of the Ouachita River by Blakely Mountain Dam ( 34°34′21″N93°11′39″W / 34.57250°N 93.19417°W / 34.57250; -93.19417 (Blakely Mountain Dam) ).

Reservoir A storage space for fluids

A reservoir is, most commonly, an enlarged natural or artificial lake, pond or impoundment created using a dam or lock to store water.

Ouachita River river in the United States of America

The Ouachita River is a 605-mile-long (974 km) river that runs south and east through the U.S. states of Arkansas and Louisiana, joining the Tensas River to form the Black River near Jonesville, Louisiana. It is the 25th-longest river in the United States.

Contents

The Downstream side of Blakely Mountain Dam as photographed from the river in July 25, 2009 Blakely Mountain Dam near Hot Springs and Lake Ouachita, Arkansas.JPG
The Downstream side of Blakely Mountain Dam as photographed from the river in July 25, 2009

Blakely Mountain Dam was built by the United States Army Corps of Engineers from 1948 to 1953 for hydroelectric power, recreation, water supply and wildlife conservation. [1] The dam is 231 feet tall, 1,100 feet long at the crest, and is capable of 75 megawatts. [2]

United States Army Corps of Engineers federal agency under the Department of Defense and a major Army command

The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is a U.S. federal agency under the Department of Defense and a major Army command made up of some 37,000 civilian and military personnel, making it one of the world's largest public engineering, design, and construction management agencies. Although generally associated with dams, canals and flood protection in the United States, USACE is involved in a wide range of public works throughout the world. The Corps of Engineers provides outdoor recreation opportunities to the public, and provides 24% of U.S. hydropower capacity.

The lake is located near Hot Springs, Arkansas. Lake Ouachita is the largest lake completely in Arkansas, as the larger [ citation needed ] Bull Shoals Lake extends into Missouri. Lake Ouachita has over 690 miles (1,110 km) of shoreline and over 66,324 [3] acres (26,840 ha) of water. It is completely surrounded by the Ouachita National Forest. Lake Ouachita is located near two other lakes, Lake Hamilton and Lake Catherine. These three lakes, DeGray Lake to the near south, and the thermal springs of Hot Springs National Park make Hot Springs a popular tourist getaway.

Hot Springs, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Hot Springs is a city in the state of Arkansas and the county seat of Garland County. The city is located in the Ouachita Mountains among the U.S. Interior Highlands, and is set among several natural hot springs for which the city is named. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a population of 35,193. In 2017 the estimated population was 36,915.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Largemouth Bass, Small Mouth Bass, Spotted Bass, Bream, Crappie, Catfish, Walleye and world class Trophy Striped Bass await the angler. Lake Ouachita is known as the Striped Bass Capital of the World. Lake Ouachita has many unusual features. One feature by the Corps of Engineers is the Geo-Float Trail, a marked trail which can be followed with a brochure which details prominent geologic features along the route.

Lake Ouachita also features one of the largest crystal veins in the world. Lake Ouachita has rare jellyfish (non-stinging) and sponges found in only very few of the cleanest freshwater lakes.

Jellyfish soft-bodied, aquatic invertebrates

Jellyfish or sea jellies are the informal common names given to the medusa-phase of certain gelatinous members of the subphylum Medusozoa, a major part of the phylum Cnidaria. Jellyfish are mainly free-swimming marine animals with umbrella-shaped bells and trailing tentacles, although a few are not mobile, being anchored to the seabed by stalks. The bell can pulsate to provide propulsion and highly efficient locomotion. The tentacles are armed with stinging cells and may be used to capture prey and defend against predators. Jellyfish have a complex life cycle; the medusa is normally the sexual phase, the planula larva can disperse widely and is followed by a sedentary polyp phase.

Sponge Animals of the phylum Porifera

Sponges, the members of the phylum Porifera, are a basal Metazoa (animal) clade as a sister of the Diploblasts. They are multicellular organisms that have bodies full of pores and channels allowing water to circulate through them, consisting of jelly-like mesohyl sandwiched between two thin layers of cells. The branch of zoology that studies sponges is known as spongiology.

Scuba divers from all over the world enjoy the underwater experience as well as the special spear fishing season. The original purpose of Lake Ouachita was flood control and hydroelectricity.

Scuba diving Diving while breathing from self-contained underwater breathing apparatus

Scuba diving is a mode of underwater diving where the diver uses a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba), which is completely independent of surface supply, to breathe underwater. Scuba divers carry their own source of breathing gas, usually compressed air, allowing them greater independence and freedom of movement than surface-supplied divers, and longer underwater endurance than breath-hold divers. Although the use of compressed air is common, a new mixture called enriched air (Nitrox) has been gaining popularity due to its benefit of reduced nitrogen intake during repetitive dives. Open circuit scuba systems discharge the breathing gas into the environment as it is exhaled, and consist of one or more diving cylinders containing breathing gas at high pressure which is supplied to the diver through a regulator. They may include additional cylinders for range extension, decompression gas or emergency breathing gas. Closed-circuit or semi-closed circuit rebreather scuba systems allow recycling of exhaled gases. The volume of gas used is reduced compared to that of open circuit, so a smaller cylinder or cylinders may be used for an equivalent dive duration. Rebreathers extend the time spent underwater compared to open circuit for the same gas consumption; they produce fewer bubbles and less noise than open circuit scuba which makes them attractive to covert military divers to avoid detection, scientific divers to avoid disturbing marine animals, and media divers to avoid bubble interference.

Another topic of debate is the vegetation that covers 10% of the lake. Lake Ouachita's vegetation is being addressed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, and the Lake Ouachita Association to control the hydrilla and Eurasian watermilfoil. The goal of the project is to contain and reduce — not to eradicate — the vegetation, since the presence of aquatic vegetation in moderate amounts is beneficial to the lake's fishery. Treatment will be concentrated on high recreational use areas, such as swimming beaches, around marinas and popular boating areas. Areas of the lake containing good fishery habitat will not be treated.

<i>Hydrilla</i> genus of aquatic plant

Hydrilla (Waterthyme) is a genus of aquatic plant, usually treated as containing just one species, Hydrilla verticillata, though some botanists divide it into several species. It is native to the cool and warm waters of the Old World in Asia, Africa and Australia, with a sparse, scattered distribution; in Australia from Northern Territory, Queensland, and New South Wales.

<i>Myriophyllum spicatum</i> species of plant

Myriophyllum spicatum is native to Europe, Asia, and north Africa, but has a wide geographic and climatic distribution among some 57 countries, extending from northern Canada to South Africa. It is a submerged aquatic plant, grows in still or slow-moving water, and is considered to be a highly invasive species.

Aerial view of Lake Ouachita, looking towards the West Aerial view of Lake Ouachita, AR.png
Aerial view of Lake Ouachita, looking towards the West

See also

Related Research Articles

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Mountain Pine is a city in Garland County, Arkansas, United States. It is part of the Hot Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 770 at the 2010 United States Census. It is located immediately southeast of Lake Ouachita below the Blakely Mountain Dam. The city consists of five defined neighborhoods, Pinewood (north), South Mountain Pine, a business district, Cozy Acres (southwest) and Mountain View/Timberland area.

Bull Shoals Lake

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Claytor Lake

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Narrows Dam

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Lake Dardanelle lake of the United States of America

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Lake Hamilton and Lake Catherine

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Robert S. Kerr Reservoir

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Winthrop Rockefeller Lake is an impounded section of the Arkansas River, named for Governor Winthrop A. Rockefeller (1912–1973). It extends almost 30 miles (50 km) along the river, from the Arthur V. Ormond Lock and Dam below Mile 177 near Morrilton, to the Dardanelle Lock and Dam above Mile 205 near Dardanelle. Lake Dardanelle begins immediately above Rockefeller Lake.

Rodman Reservoir

Rodman Reservoir, or Lake Ocklawaha, is an artificial reservoir located on the Ocklawaha River in Putnam County and Marion County in north central Florida. The reservoir, located about 15 miles southwest of Palatka, is approximately 15 miles in length, covers 9,500 acres and is located between State Road 19 on the east and State Road 315 on the west. [1] It is also a premier largemouth bass fishery for Northeast Florida.

Womble Trail, located in the Ouachita National Forest in western Arkansas, United States, is a singletrack path running more than 37 miles from North Fork Lake to the Ouachita National Recreation Trail. The U.S. Forest Service trail is open for use by mountain bikers and hikers. Horses are not allowed. The nearest towns are Mount Ida and Oden.

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-09-13. Retrieved 2012-07-23.
  2. http://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=5815
  3. http://www.lakeouachita.org/