Landmarks of Britain

Last updated
United Kingdom
Value 2 pounds sterling
Mass 31.21 g
Diameter 38.61 mm
Edge Milled
Composition .999 fine silver
Years of minting 2016
Obverse
Design Queen Elizabeth II
Designer Jody Clark
Reverse
Design Big Ben
Designer Glyn Davies and Laura Clancy
Design date 2015

Landmarks of Britain is a series of silver bullion coins produced by the Royal Mint in the United Kingdom. The first coin was released in 2017 and features a design of Big Ben previously used on a £100 coin released in 2015. The second and third coins, both released in 2018, feature Tower Bridge and Trafalgar Square. The next coin is expected to portray Buckingham Palace. [1] [2] The coin has a maximum mintage of 50,000. [3] The same designs appeared on a four coin proof set in 2014, these had trichromatic colour-printing and had a mintage of only 3,500 sets. [4]

Royal Mint minter of coins in the United Kingdom

The Royal Mint is a government-owned mint that produces coins for the United Kingdom. Operating under the name Royal Mint Ltd, the mint is a limited company that is wholly owned by Her Majesty's Treasury and is under an exclusive contract to supply all the nation's coinage. As well as minting circulating coins for use domestically and internationally, the mint also produces planchets, commemorative coins, various types of medals and precious metal bullion. The mint exports to an average of 60 countries a year, making up 70% of its total sales. Formed over 1,100 years ago, the mint was historically part of a series of mints that became centralised to produce coins for the Kingdom of England, all of Great Britain and eventually most of the British Empire. The original London mint from which the Royal Mint is the successor, was established in 886 AD and operated within the Tower of London for approximately 800 years before moving to what is now called Royal Mint Court where it remained until the 1960s. As Britain followed the rest of the world in decimalising its currency, the Mint moved from London to a new 38 acres (15 ha) plant in Llantrisant, Wales where it has remained since.

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom (UK), officially the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and sometimes referred to as Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world. It is also the 22nd-most populous country, with an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

Big Ben Bell within the clock tower at the Palace of Westminster in London, England

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London and is usually extended to refer to both the clock and the clock tower. The official name of the tower in which Big Ben is located was originally the Clock Tower, but it was renamed Elizabeth Tower in 2012 to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II.

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References

  1. "Landmarks of Britain 2017 – Big Ben – 1 oz Silver Bullion Coin". royalmintbullion.com. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  2. "Landmarks Of Britain Bullion Series Debuts". coinworld.com. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  3. "APMEX World Coins – New Landmarks of Britain Series Brings London to Life". CoinWeek . Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  4. "ROYAL MINT PORTRAIT OF BRITAIN COLLECTION SHOWCASES LONDON - AgAuNEWS". agaunews.com. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
Coins of the pound sterling Wikimedia list article

The standard circulating coinage of the United Kingdom is denominated in pounds sterling, and, since the introduction of the two-pound coin in 1994, ranges in value from one penny to two pounds. Since decimalisation, on 15 February 1971, the pound has been divided into 100 (new) pence. From the 16th century until decimalisation, the pound was divided into 20 shillings, each of 12 (old) pence. British coins are minted by the Royal Mint in Llantrisant, Wales. The Royal Mint also commissions the coins' designs.

Silver may be used as an investment like other precious metals. It has been regarded as a form of money and store of value for more than 4,000 years, although it has lost its role as a legal tender in all developed countries since the end of the silver standard. Some countries mint bullion and collector coins, however, such as the American Silver Eagle with nominal face values. In 2009, the main demand for silver was for industrial applications (40%), jewellery, bullion coins, and exchange-traded products. In 2011, the global silver reserves amounted to 530,000 tonnes.