Larry Whiteside

Last updated

Larry Whiteside
Larry Whiteside.jpg
Born(1937-09-19)September 19, 1937
DiedJune 15, 2007(2007-06-15) (aged 69)
Alma mater Drake University
OccupationSportswriter
Years active1959–2004
Known forBoston Red Sox coverage
Spouse(s)Elaine
Children1
Awards J. G. Taylor Spink Award (2008)

Lawrence W. Whiteside (September 19, 1937 – June 15, 2007), nicknamed "Sides", [1] was an American journalist known for his newspaper coverage of baseball, most notably of the Boston Red Sox for The Boston Globe .

Contents

Early life

Whiteside was born in Chicago, in 1937. He graduated from Drake University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1959. [2] While at Drake, he wrote for The Des Moines Register. [3]

Career

Whiteside became a full-time writer with the Kansas City Kansan in 1959. [3] He moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he covered the Milwaukee Braves as well as civil rights issues for The Milwaukee Journal . Team owner Bud Selig offered Whiteside a job with the Milwaukee Brewers when the franchise relocated from Seattle in 1970, but he preferred to continue working in journalism.

In 1971, Whiteside started The Black List to help sports editors find qualified black journalists to hire. Initially The Black List only had nine names, but by 1983 it had expanded to more than 90. [4]

Boston

Whiteside moved to Boston in 1973, where he worked for The Boston Globe through the end of his career. [3] At the time, he was the only black journalist covering Major League Baseball on a daily basis for a major paper. [4]

Whiteside covered many of the most notable events in Boston baseball history, ranging from Bucky Dent's home run to defeat the Boston Red Sox in the 1978 American League East playoff, to the Red Sox losing the 1986 World Series to the New York Mets, to Roger Clemens' second 20-strikeout game. [3]

Whiteside was an expert on Negro league baseball, and was one of the first American journalists to follow baseball in other countries. [4] The National Association of Black Journalists gave Whiteside a lifetime achievement award in 1999. [2] He was part of the panel that chose the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. [4]

Whiteside developed Parkinson's disease early in the 21st century, which led to the end of his reporting career in 2004. [3] In September 2003, the Red Sox had Whiteside throw out a ceremonial first pitch at Fenway Park. [5] Whiteside died in Boston in June 2007, survived by his wife and one son. [3] The day that Whiteside died, the Red Sox observed a moment of silence in his honor prior to their home game against the San Francisco Giants. [3]

Legacy

In July 2007, Whiteside was selected by a Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) committee as one of three finalists for the J. G. Taylor Spink Award, [6] and he was announced as the winner on December 5 following a vote by the BBWAA membership; he was honored in July 2008 with inclusion in the writers' wing of the Baseball Hall of Fame. [7] Whiteside became the first African-American beat writer to receive the Spink Award. [8]

Related Research Articles

Baseball Writers Association of America

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers, magazines and qualifying websites.

Peter Gammons

Peter Gammons is an American sportswriter, media personality, and musician. He is a recipient of the J. G. Taylor Spink Award for outstanding baseball writing, given by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

BBWAA Career Excellence Award Annual award for baseball writers

The BBWAA Career Excellence Award, formerly the J. G. Taylor Spink Award, is the highest award given by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). It is given "for meritorious contributions to baseball writing" and voted on annually by the BBWAA. Winners are typically announced in December, with the award presented during induction festivities of the Baseball Hall of Fame in July. Winners are not considered to be members of the Hall; they are not "inducted" or "enshrined", but are permanently recognized in an exhibit at the Hall's library.

Dan Shaughnessy

Dan Shaughnessy is an American sports writer. He has covered the Boston Red Sox for The Boston Globe since 1981. In 2016, he was given the J. G. Taylor Spink Award by the Baseball Hall of Fame. Shaughnessy is often referred to by his nickname "Shank," given by the 1980s Boston Celtics team for the often unflattering and critical nature of his articles.

Fred Lieb American sportswriter

Frederick George Lieb was an American sportswriter and baseball historian. Lieb published his memoirs in 1977, which documented his nearly 70 years as a baseball reporter. He received the J. G. Taylor Spink Award from the Baseball Writers' Association of America in 1972. Born in 1888 in Philadelphia, Lieb died at age 92 in Houston.

Dustin Pedroia American baseball player

Dustin Luis Pedroia is an American former professional baseball second baseman who played his entire Major League Baseball career for the Boston Red Sox from 2006 to 2019. He was a four-time All-Star, and won the American League (AL) Rookie of The Year Award in 2007 and the AL Most Valuable Player and Silver Slugger Award in 2008. He has also received four Gold Glove Awards and was named AL Defensive Player of the Year in 2013.

Tim Murnane American baseball player

Timothy Hayes Murnane was an American sportswriter specializing in baseball, regarded as the leading baseball writer at The Boston Globe for about 30 years until his death. At the same time, he organized and led professional sports leagues and helped govern the baseball industry. He had been a professional baseball player, and played several seasons in the major leagues as a first baseman and center fielder.

J. G. Taylor Spink

John George Taylor Spink, commonly known as J. G. Taylor Spink or Taylor Spink, was the publisher of The Sporting News from 1914 until his death in 1962. He inherited the weekly American baseball newspaper from his father Charles Spink, younger brother of its founder Alfred H. Spink. In 1962, the Baseball Writers' Association of America established an annual J. G. Taylor Spink Award and named him the first recipient; Spink's name was removed from the award in February 2021 due to his history of supporting segregated baseball.

The 1990 Boston Red Sox season was the 90th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League East with a record of 88 wins and 74 losses. It was the third AL East division championship in five years for the Red Sox. However, the team was defeated in a four-game sweep by the Oakland Athletics in the ALCS, as had been the case in 1988.

Marty McHale American baseball player

Martin Joseph McHale was an American professional baseball pitcher who played the Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians in Major League Baseball between 1910 and 1916. He also performed professionally in vaudeville and worked as a stockbroker.

Edgar Munzel American sportswriter

Edgar Herman Munzel was an American sportswriter who covered baseball for the Chicago Herald-Examiner and Chicago Sun-Times from 1929 to 1973.

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1980 followed the system in place since 1978. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected Al Kaline and Duke Snider. The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro leagues. It selected outfielder Chuck Klein and Boston Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey, both deceased. A formal induction ceremony was held in Cooperstown, New York, on August 3, 1980, with Commissioner of Baseball Bowie Kuhn presiding.

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1963 followed a system established for odd-number years after the 1956 election. Namely, the baseball writers were voting on recent players only in even-number years.

John Carmichael (sportswriter) American sportswriter

John Peter Carmichael was an American sportswriter for over 40 years, primarily in Chicago.

James Isaminger American sportswriter

James Campbell Isaminger was an American sportswriter for newspapers in Philadelphia from 1905 to 1940, covering every World Series during that time.

Harold Kaese American sportswriter

Harold William Kaese was an American sports writer, best known for covering Major League Baseball in Boston, Massachusetts.

Claire Smith is an American sportswriter, best known for covering Major League Baseball for the Hartford Courant, The New York Times, and The Philadelphia Inquirer. She is currently a news editor for ESPN. Smith was the first woman to be honored with the J. G. Taylor Spink Award by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

2020 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the National Baseball Hall of Fame for 2020 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2016. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players. The results were announced on January 21, 2020, with Derek Jeter and Larry Walker elected to the Hall of Fame.

2021 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the National Baseball Hall of Fame for 2021 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2016. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players. The results were announced on January 26, 2021, with no players receiving enough votes to be inducted.

Nick Cafardo American sportswriter and sports author

Nicholas Dominic Cafardo was an American sportswriter and sports author. A longtime columnist and beat reporter for The Boston Globe, he primarily covered the Boston Red Sox. In December 2019, Cafardo was named the J. G. Taylor Spink Award recipient for 2020.

References

  1. "Longtime baseball reporter Larry Whiteside dies at 69". Akron Beacon Journal . AP. June 16, 2007. p. C6. Retrieved February 27, 2021 via newspapers.com.
  2. 1 2 Who's Who Among African Americans, 20th ed. Gale, 2007
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Gasper, Christopher L. (June 16, 2007). "Larry Whiteside; Globe writer aided other black journalists". The Boston Globe . p. 17. Retrieved February 27, 2021 via newspapers.com.
  4. 1 2 3 4 "Larry Whiteside, 69, black sports journalist". Houston Chronicle . AP. June 15, 2007 via chron.com.
  5. Hohler, Bob (September 25, 2003). "Red Sox Notebook". The Boston Globe . p. 49. Retrieved February 27, 2021 via newspapers.com.
  6. The Boston Globe, "Whiteside a finalist" July 11 2007
  7. "Larry Whiteside of Boston Globe given Spink Award". Yahoo! Sports. Associated Press. December 5, 2007. Retrieved December 5, 2007.
  8. Nick Cafardo (December 6, 2007). "Whiteside receives top writing Accolade". The Boston Globe . Retrieved January 9, 2008.

Further reading