Larvik

Last updated
Larvik Municipality
Larvik kommune
Larvik torg sett mot gaten Larvik torg.jpg
Larvik town square, 2008
Nickname(s): 
Bakkebyen, The Hilly City
Norway Counties Vestfold Position.svg
Vestfold within Norway
NO 3909 Larvik.svg
Larvik within Vestfold
Coordinates: 59°4′52″N10°0′59″E / 59.08111°N 10.01639°E / 59.08111; 10.01639
Country Norway
County Vestfold
Established1 Jan 1838
  Created as Formannskapsdistrikt
Administrative centre Larvik
Government
  Mayor (2023)Birgitte Gulla Løken (H)
Area
  Total812.88 km2 (313.85 sq mi)
  Land771.41 km2 (297.84 sq mi)
  Water41.47 km2 (16.01 sq mi)  5.1%
  Rank#140 in Norway
Population
 (2023)
  Total48,246
  Rank#21 in Norway
  Density62.5/km2 (162/sq mi)
  Change (10 years)
Increase2.svg +5.9%
Demonyms Larviking
Larviker
Larvikar [1]
Official language
[2]
   Norwegian form Neutral
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 code NO-3909 [3]
Website Official website

Larvik (Urban East Norwegian: [ˈlɑ̂rviːk] ) [4] is a municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Vestfold. The administrative centre of the municipality is the city of Larvik. Other main population centres in the municipality include the town of Stavern and the villages of Gjone, Helgeroa, Hem, Kjose, Kvelde, Nevlunghavn, Skinmo, Svarstad, Ula, Verningen, and Tjøllingvollen. [5]

Contents

The 813-square-kilometre (314 sq mi) municipality is the 140th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Larvik is the 21st most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 48,246. The municipality's population density is 62.5 inhabitants per square kilometre (162/sq mi) and its population has increased by 5.9% over the previous 10-year period. [6] [7]

The city of Larvik achieved market town status in 1671, but it did not become a self-governing municipality until 1 January 1838 when the formannskapsdistrikt law went into effect. [8]

Larvik is known as the hometown of Thor Heyerdahl. [9] :30 It is also home to Bøkeskogen , the northernmost beech tree forest in the world. Larvik is the home of Norway's only natural mineral water spring, Farriskilden. [8] [10] Farris Bad, located in Larvik, has been described as one of the best spas in Europe. [11] It has the largest spa department in Scandinavia. [12]

General information

The town of Larvik was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt law). On 1 January 1875, a small area of Brunlanes Municipality (population: 4) and a different area of Hedrum Municipality (population: 46) were both transferred into the town of Larvik. In 1937, another area of Hedrum Municipality (population: 69) was transferred into Larvik. In 1948, an area of Hedrum Municipality (population: 296) was transferred into Larvik. On 1 January 1974, the unpopulated Tagtvedt area of Hedrum was transferred to Larvik. On 1 January 1986, part of the Åsveien 3 property in Hedrum was transferred to the neighboring town of Larvik. [13]

On 1 January 1988, the city of Larvik was part of a major municipal merger which consolidated the municipalities of Brunlanes (population: 8,138), Hedrum (population: 10,449), and Tjølling (population: 7,878) with the towns of Larvik (population: 8,045) and Stavern (population: 2,538) to create a new, much larger Larvik Municipality with a population of 37,048 people. [13]

On 1 January 2018, Lardal Municipality was merged the neighboring Larvik Municipality as part of a nationwide municipal reform. [14] After merging, Larvik was the largest municipality in Vestfold by area and the second-most populous municipality in Vestfold. [15]

Etymology

The municipality (originally the town of Larvik) is named after the small cove at the end of the Larviksfjorden, which was historically called Lagarvík in Old Norse. The first element is the genitive case of lǫgr 'water, river' (here referring to the Numedalslågen River). The last element is vík 'cove, inlet'. Thus, the meaning of the name is 'cove at the mouth of a river'. Prior to 1889, the name was written Laurvik or Laurvig. [16]

Coat of arms

Arms from 1899 to 1989 Larvik komm 1899.svg
Arms from 1899 to 1989
Arms from 1989 to 2018 Larvik komm.svg
Arms from 1989 to 2018
Arms since 2018 Larvik komm 2018.svg
Arms since 2018

Larvik has had three different coats of arms since 1889.

The first coat of arms was granted in 1889 and it was in use until 20 January 1989 when a new coat of arms was granted. The official blazon was "Argent, a leaved tree issuant from a mount vert". This means the arms have a field (background) has a tincture of argent which means it is commonly colored white, but if it is made out of metal, then silver is used. The charge is a green tree growing out of a green hill. The green color in the field and the tree design symbolize the local beech forest around the town. This design may have been chosen because for a couple of reasons. A beech tree had been used by the 18th century governor of the area, Jens Kielman. Also this beech tree design was part of a seal of a local guild in the early 19th century. [17]

The second coat of arms was granted on 17 March 1989 and it was in use until 1 January 2018. The official blazon was "Azure, a mast with three sails argent" (Norwegian : I blått en sølv mast med tre seil). This means the arms have a blue field (background) and the charge is a ship's mast with three sails. The charge has a tincture of argent which means it is commonly colored white, but if it is made out of metal, then silver is used. The blue color in the field and the design were chosen to represent the maritime traditions of the municipality. The arms were designed by Kjell Ronald Hansen. The municipal flag had the same design as the coat of arms. [17] [18] [19] [20]

The current coat of arms was adopted for use starting on 1 January 2018. The blazon is "Azure, a tree with seven droplet-shaped leaves, of which six are opposite two and two, issuant from a mount argent" (Norwegian : I blått et oppvoksende tre med syv dråpeformede blader hvor av seks er motstående to og to, alt i sølv). This means the arms have a blue field (background) and the charge is a tree design with six leaves shaped like water droplets that are arranged symmetrically, three on each side and one on top. The charge has a tincture of argent which means it is commonly colored white, but if it is made out of metal, then silver is used. The arms have a complex symbolism. The seven drops symbolize forest water that flows into streams and further into the main Numedalslågen and Farriselva rivers. The tree design symbolizes the importance of the local beech forests and forestry industry. The six water drops also symbolized the ports spread along the coast as well as the six former municipalities that are now together as one large municipality. The arms were designed by Tormod Henriksen from Svarstad. The municipal flag had the same design as the coat of arms. [17] [21] [22] [23]

History

Istrehagan contains rock carvings dated to 1500-500 BCE. Istrehagan, Tjolling (14550732106).jpg
Istrehågan contains rock carvings dated to 1500-500 BCE.
Helgeroa Harbour in 1953. Helgeroa - no-nb digifoto 20151126 00250 NB MIT FNR 13928.jpg
Helgeroa Harbour in 1953.

Various remains from the Stone Age have been discovered throughout the municipality of Larvik, for instance by Torpevannet near the village of Helgeroa. Raet goes through all of Vestfold County before peaking out of the ocean in Mølen in Larvik. Ancient peoples have carried rocks from Raet and constructed vast numbers of burial mounds at Mølen. During the Roman Iron Age, ancient peoples erected a stone monument resembling a ship at Istrehågan, one of Norway's greatest remains (oldtidsminne) from prehistoric times. [25] :8

About 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) southeast of the town is Skiringssal, an archaeological site where archaeologists first discovered burial mounds and an ancient Viking hall, and later uncovered the nearby remains of an ancient town, Kaupang. This is now known as the oldest known merchant town in Norway. There was international trade from this area, over 1,200 years ago. [25] :12 Skiringssal has remains from the oldest town yet discovered in the Nordic countries, [26] and it was one of Scandinavia's earliest urban sites. [27]

Larvik (which historically used the Danish spelling: Laurvig) was an old coastal village. In 1671, the village received kjøpstad (market town) status in 1671 when Ulrik Fredrik Gyldenløve bought the Fritsø estate. He later became the first Count of Laurvig. The count built a new residence in 1674, "Herregården", which can still be visited today. [28] [5] The whole Larvik area was owned by a Danish Count (grevskap) until 1817. Since the rest of Norway had come under Swedish rule in 1814, the county was purchased by four local businessmen in 1817. [29] Then in 1821, it became part of the newly created Jarslberg og Laurvigs amt (county).

Larvik is also the site of the Treschow estate, "Fritzøehus", which is currently owned by the heirs of Mille-Marie Treschow, reportedly "Norway's richest woman". The Treschow estate was created in 1835 when Willum Frederik Treschow bought the county from the Danish crown, who in turn had bought the county from the local consortium "grevlingene", four local entrepreneurs who proved unable to manage the ownership financially (the consortium had bought the county from the Danish crown in 1817 originally, the crown taking over the county when the last of the counts had to sell it because of debt).

Larvik, along with neighbouring cities of Sandefjord and Tønsberg, were the three dominant whaling cities of Norway in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. [30]

Government

Larvik Municipality is responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, welfare and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads and utilities. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of directly elected representatives. The mayor is indirectly elected by a vote of the municipal council. [31] The municipality is under the jurisdiction of the Vestfold District Court and the Agder Court of Appeal.

Municipal council

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Larvik is made up of representatives that are elected to four year terms. The tables below show the current and historical composition of the council by political party.

Larvik kommunestyre 20232027 [32]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)9
  Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)11
  Industry and Business Party (Industri og Næringspartiet)2
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Red Party (Rødt)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:41
Larvik kommunestyre 20192023 [33]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)6
  Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)2
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Red Party (Rødt)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
  Better Larvik (BedreLarvik)4
Total number of members:41
Larvik kommunestyre 20152019 [34] [35]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)6
  Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)2
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:35
Larvik kommunestyre 20112015 [36]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)8
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)1
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:35
Larvik kommunestyre 20072011 [35]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)8
  Conservative Party (Høyre)9
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)1
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
  Larvik List (Larvikslista)4
Total number of members:35
Larvik kommunestyre 20032007 [35]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)10
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
  Larvik List (Larvikslista)8
Total number of members:53
Larvik kommunestyre 19992003 [35] [37]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)11
  Conservative Party (Høyre)13
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)5
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:53
Larvik kommunestyre 19951999 [38]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)11
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:53
Larvik kommunestyre 19911995 [39]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)5
  Conservative Party (Høyre)15
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)7
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:53
Larvik kommunestyre 19871991 [40]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)24
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)8
  Conservative Party (Høyre)20
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)6
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:69
Larvik bystyre 19831987 [41]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)23
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)13
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:45
Larvik bystyre 19791983 [42]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
  Conservative Party (Høyre)13
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:45
Larvik bystyre 19751979 [43]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
  Conservative Party (Høyre)12
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)5
  New People's Party (Nye Folkepartiet)1
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)5
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:53
Larvik bystyre 19711975 [44]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)26
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
  Socialist common list (Venstresosialistiske felleslister)7
Total number of members:53
Larvik bystyre 19671971 [45]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
  Conservative Party (Høyre)11
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:53
Larvik bystyre 19631967 [46]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)30
  Conservative Party (Høyre)12
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)5
Total number of members:53
Larvik bystyre 19591963 [47]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)29
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)5
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:53
Larvik bystyre 19551959 [48]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)29
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)5
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:53
Larvik bystyre 19511955 [49]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
  Conservative Party (Høyre)9
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)6
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:52
Larvik bystyre 19471951 [50]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)5
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:44
Larvik bystyre 19451947 [51]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)14
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)7
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)6
Total number of members:52
Larvik bystyre 19371940* [52]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)29
  Liberal Party (Venstre)9
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)14
Total number of members:52
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.
Larvik bystyre 19341937 [53]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)26
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)7
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)12
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)6
Total number of members:52
Larvik bystyre 19311934 [54]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)25
  Conservative Party (Høyre)18
  Liberal Party (Venstre)9
Total number of members:52
Larvik bystyre 19281931 [55]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)26
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)9
 Joint list of the Conservative Party  (Høyre) and the Free-minded Liberal Party  (Frisinnede Venstre)16
Total number of members:52
Larvik bystyre 19251928 [56]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
  Social Democratic Labour Party
(Socialdemokratiske Arbeiderparti)
5
  Liberal Party (Venstre)10
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)16
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)2
  Workers' Common List (Arbeidernes fellesliste)1
Total number of members:52
Larvik bystyre 19221925 [57]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
  Temperance Party (Avholdspartiet)4
  Social Democratic Labour Party
(Socialdemokratiske Arbeiderparti)
6
  Liberal Party (Venstre)4
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)16
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)4
Total number of members:52
Larvik bystyre 19191922 [58]   
Party name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)23
  Temperance Party (Avholdspartiet)5
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)16
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)2
Total number of members:52

Mayors

The mayors (Norwegian : ordfører) of Larvik: [59] [60] [61]

  • 1838-1840: Parish priest Castberg
  • 1841-1848: Ahlert Hysing
  • 1849-1857: Johan Sverdrup (V)
  • 1858-1860: Thorvald Olsen
  • 1861-1868: Christian Christiansen (H)
  • 1869-1870: T.M. Nielsen
  • 1871-1874: Jens Zetlitz
  • 1875-1875: Carl Lund
  • 1875-1878: Christian Christiansen (H)
  • 1878-1880: J.W. Falch
  • 1880-1884: Lauritz Schmidt
  • 1885-1886: Jul. Johnsen
  • 1887-1888: Lauritz Schmidt
  • 1889-1890: Colin Archer
  • 1891-1891: Mr. Sølsberg
  • 1891-1892: Sophus Caspar Singdahlsen
  • 1893-1897: Michael Velo (SmP)
  • 1898-1898: Thorvald Johansen
  • 1899-1901: Michael Velo (SmP)
  • 1901-1903: Magnus Hesselberg Oppen
  • 1904-1904: Niels Christian Odberg (V)
  • 1905-1907: Thomas Arbo Høeg
  • 1908-1910: Niels Christian Odberg (V)
  • 1911-1911: Magnus Hesselberg Oppen
  • 1912-1914: Ludvig Næss (V)
  • 1915-1919: Karl B. Løwe (V)
  • 1920-1921: Oscar Andersen (Ap)
  • 1922-1923: Johan Andersen (Ap)
  • 1924-1928: Trygve Rynning (LL)
  • 1929-1931: Oscar Andersen (Ap)
  • 1932-1934: Trygve Rynning (LL)
  • 1934-1940: Oscar Andersen (Ap)
  • 1941-1941: Karl B. Løwe (V)
  • 1941-1945: Rolf Bjørn Høvik (NS)
  • 1945-1945: Oscar Andersen (Ap)
  • 1946-1953: Charles Anderssen (Ap)
  • 1953-1955: Kristian Albert Christiansen (Ap)
  • 1956-1959: Christian Larsen (Ap)
  • 1960-1971: Reidar Hansen (Ap)
  • 1972-1983: Gunnar Ellefsen (Ap)
  • 1984-1987: Gunnar Jensen (Ap)
  • 1988-1991: Arild Lund (H)
  • 1992-1993: Ragnar Johannessen (Ap)
  • 1994-1999: Øyvind Hunskaar (Sp)
  • 1999-2011: Øyvind Riise Jenssen (H)
  • 2011-2019: Rune Høiseth (Ap)
  • 2019-2023: Erik Bringedal (H)
  • 2023–present: Birgitte Gulla Løken (H) [62]

Demographics

Number of minorities in Larvik (1st & 2nd gen - 2023) [63]
AncestryNumber
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 1439
Flag of Syria.svg  Syria 587
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 535
Flag of Iraq.svg  Iraq 439
Flag of Vietnam.svg  Vietnam 305
Flag of Somalia.svg  Somalia 275
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 245
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 229
Flag of Kosovo.svg  Kosovo 227
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 207
Flag of Eritrea.svg  Eritrea 203
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 198
Flag of Turkey.svg  Türkiye 176
Flag of the Philippines.svg  Philippines 173
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia 161
Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 148
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 132
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 127
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 123
Flag of the Taliban.svg  Afghanistan 106

Larvik's population is primarily centred along the coast. The administrative centre of the municipality is the town of Larvik, is one of two cities in the municipality; the other one being Stavern. The city's residential areas are first and foremost in the hills between the fjord and Bøkeskogen. [5]

The municipality had a total population of 48,396 as of 2023, with 4,159 of them being immigrants to Norway from other countries. [64] Figures from a census held at the beginning of the 19th century indicate that Larvik's population has quadrupled in approximately 200 years. Its population however is spread through the municipality, and about 50% of the people reside in the city of Larvik. The majority of the population is found along and around the Larviksfjorden, from Stavern in the west to Gon in the east. [9] :32 The population sometimes doubles during summer weeks due to tourism. [9] :48 Larvik is home to 4,886 vacation homes as of 2023. [64]

Economy

Larvik is the most important agricultural municipality in Vestfold county. Besides grains, other crops grown include potatoes and vegetables. It has the county's largest production of cucumbers and tomatoes. Important industries are commerce, hotel management, and restaurant management. The fishing industry in Larvik is the second-largest in Vestfold, only smaller than the fishing industry in Færder Municipality. Important fishing harbours include Stavern, Helgeroa, and Nevlunghavn. Furthermore, Larvik has the biggest logging industry in the county. Norway Spruce is the most important tree species. [5] The mined mineral Larvikite is exported from Larvik to countries in Europe and to the United States. [25] :64

Tourism

Beach at Ula. Beach, Ula.jpg
Beach at Ula.

Larvik is first and foremost known as a summer vacation community. Due to its stable climate and one of Norway's highest median temperatures, Larvik experiences significant summer tourism. [9] :97 [25] :70 Larvik's climate is among the mildest in Norway, with one of the nation's highest number of annual sunshine days. It is home to nearly 5,000 holiday homes. [64] [9] :64

The coastal town of Stavern and picturesque villages of Helgeroa and Nevlunghavn receive large numbers of tourists during summer months. Stavern is known as a summer community, and its population more than doubles during summers. [65] [8] Tourist attractions in Stavern include Hall of Remembrance, Fredriksvern, and Citadellet. Citadel Island is home of Staverns Fortress which dates to the 1680s. The island is a current refuge for artists. [66] [8]

Kaupang has been described as the "chief attraction" for visitors in Larvik. [67] Kapuang is also known as Norway's most important monument from the Viking Age. [9] :14 Another source describes Mølen Geopark as Larvik's most visited tourist attraction. [9] :64 Other attractions include the Maritime Museum, Fritzøehus, Herregården, the home of Thor Heyerdahl, and Bøkeskogen. Larvik is also home to Farris Bad, the largest spa in the Nordic countries, which has been described as one of Europe's best spa facilities. [11]

Geography

Torstrand in Larvik. Larvik Torstrand.jpg
Torstrand in Larvik.
Bokeskogen is Norway's largest and the northernmost beech tree forest on Earth. Fagus sylvatica LVK.JPG
Bøkeskogen is Norway's largest and the northernmost beech tree forest on Earth.

Larvik occupies the southwestern corner of Vestfold county, between Sandefjord Municipality in the east and the Langesundsfjorden in the west. The coastline of Larvik stretches from the entrance to the Sandefjordsfjord and to the Langesundsfjord, with the Larviksfjorden in the middle. The coastline consists of various beaches, bays, islets, and skerries. The land is relatively flat along the coast and by the many bays, while the interior parts consist of large and hilly woodlands. Larger mountains are found along the border with Telemark County in the west. [25] :6 The municipality has a 110 kilometres (68 mi) coastline, a listtle shorter than that of neighbouring Sandefjord Municipality. [68]

The municipality is located approximately 105 kilometres (65 mi) southwest of the Norwegian capital, Oslo. The municipality covers an area of 813 square kilometres (314 sq mi), making it the largest municipality in Vestfold county. By population, however, Larvik is the third-most populous municipality, only smaller than neighbouring Tønsberg and Sandefjord municipalities. [9] :32 Larvik has its own fjord which connects to the Lågen River. [69]

Larvik borders Kongsberg Municipality in the north (in Buskerud county), Sandefjord Municipality in the east, and Porsgrunn Municipality and Siljan Municipality (both in Telemark county) in the west. The southernmost point in the municipality is Tvistein Lighthouse in the sea south of Hummerbakken in Brunlanes. On the mainland, its southernmost point is found in Oddane, between Mølen and Nevlunghavn. The westernmost point is Geiterøya Island in the Langesundsfjord, and the easternmost point is one of the Rauer islets. The highest point is the 622-metre (2,041 ft) tall mountain Vindfjell which lies on the western border with Siljan Municipality in Telemark county. [9] :32

Notable geographical features include the lake Farris and the river Numedalslågen, locally called Lågen, which terminates at the Larviksfjorden at the town of Larvik. Other bodies of water include the lakes Farris, Goksjø, and Hallevatnet.

Larvik is also noted for its natural springs of mineral water, Farriskildene, which have been commercially exploited under the brand name Farris . At Kaupang in Tjølling lies the remains of the medieval Skiringssal trading outpost. Larvik is also home to the world's northernmost natural occurrence of Fagus sylvatica forests (European Beech tree), known as Bøkeskogen ("The Beech Tree Forest").

Larvik panorama Larvik panorama.jpg
Larvik panorama

Villages

Harbour in Nevlunghavn, a small fishing village and the southernmost point in mainland Vestfold. Nevlunghavn - brygga.jpg
Harbour in Nevlunghavn, a small fishing village and the southernmost point in mainland Vestfold.

The municipality is home to two cities and seven larger urban villages: [5] [70]

Himberg is an exclave which is part of Sandefjord Municipality, although it is completely surrounded by Larvik Municipality in all directions. [71] [72] [73] Attempts at annexing Himberg into Larvik Municipality have largely been met with protests from Himberg residents. A 1995 attempt at annexing Himberg was cancelled due to protests from local residents. [74] There are only four such enclaves in Norway, and Himberg is the most populous enclave in Norway, with a population of approximately 40 people. Himberg is 1.4 square kilometres (0.54 sq mi). [75]

Transportation

Larvik is served by Sandefjord Airport Torp, its nearest international airport. [9] :6 The European route E18 highway traverses the municipality and is one of Norway's most important main highways. [76] Larvik Station is the city's main railway station along the Vestfoldbanen railway line. Daily ferries to Hirtshals, Denmark depart from the city harbour and are operated by Color Line. [26] The neighbouring city of Sandefjord has several ferry links with daily departures to Strömstad, Sweden and, further south, the town of Langesund links to Hirtshals, Denmark through a ferry which is operated by Fjord Line.

Recreation areas

Larvik is home to two of Vesfold's largest lakes: Farris and Goksjo. Farrisvannet fra sofaen.jpg
Larvik is home to two of Vesfold's largest lakes: Farris and Goksjø.

Recreation areas in Larvik include the beach Lydhusstranda at Naverfjorden. [77]

The river Numedalslågen is considered to be one of Norway's best salmon fishing rivers. [25] :68 [78] [5] Freshwater fishing is also common at the lake Goksjø, which lies on the Sandefjord-Larvik border. Fish species in this lake include Northern pike, European perch, Ide, Common dace, European eel, Salmon, and Brown trout. [79] The lake is also used for ice-skating, canoeing, swimming, boating, and other recreational activities.

The 12-metre (39 ft) tall Trollfoss is the largest and tallest waterfall in Vestfold County. [5] [80] :96 [81] [82]

Hiking trails can be found throughout the municipality, including in the city forest Bøkeskogen , Norway's largest beech tree forest. [9] :23 [25] :58 This forest is home to various trails, starting at 2.6 kilometres (1.6 mi) in length up to 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) in length. [83] Hiking trails can also be found at Mølen, which is an UNESCO GeoPark and home of Norway's largest stone beach. [84] [85] The Coastal Path (Kyststien) is a 35-kilometre (22 mi) path through Brunlanes to the town Stavern. Additional hiking trails can be found by the lakes Goksjø and Farris. Farris Lake is the largest lake in Vestfold County. [9] :99

Due to the municipality's many rural areas, Larvik is known for its game hunting, and large forests are open for hunting. There are great stocks of moose; Larvik has among Norway's highest number of moose. [5] Between 700-800 moose are annually slaughtered in the county. [86] Other important species of game are Roe deer, Red deer, Mountain hare, European beaver, and Common wood pigeon. [87]

Beaches

Batteristranda in Larvik city centre. Batteristranda.JPG
Batteristranda in Larvik city centre.
Beach in the village of Ula. Beach, Ula.jpg
Beach in the village of Ula.

List of publicly-owned beaches in Larvik:

Culture

Larvik Museum

Larvik Maritime Museum is housed in Larvik's oldest brick building. Kirkestredet 5 Larvik.jpg
Larvik Maritime Museum is housed in Larvik's oldest brick building.

The Larvik Museum Society was founded in 1916. The museum is now associated with the Vestfold Museum (Vestfoldmuseene). Larvik Museum was established with the purpose of preserving, and restoring the city's collection of historic buildings. [88] [89] [90]

Verkensgarden houses geological exhibitions of Larvikite, a locally quarried 500-million-year-old granite type. Larvik museum.jpg
Verkensgården houses geological exhibitions of Larvikite, a locally quarried 500-million-year-old granite type.

The Treschow-Fritzøe Museum (Verkensgården) houses exhibitions from the former Treschow-Fritzøe ironworks. Verkensgarorden displays tools, equipment, drawings, and models illustrating the iron-production era in Larvik, which dated from 1670 to 1870. The exhibition shows various aspects; from the geological process of creation to production, and use of the stone larvikite, the area's main export product. The Iron Works was closed during 1868. [92]

Herregarden is one of Norway's best preserved wooden structures. Larvik Herregaarden.jpg
Herregården is one of Norway's best preserved wooden structures.
Fritzoehus is the largest privately owned estate in Norway. Fritzoehus.jpg
Fritzøehus is the largest privately owned estate in Norway.

Manor House (Herregården) was built by Ulrik Fredrik Gyldenløve for his third wedding in 1677. It is a large wooden structure with well-preserved baroque interiors from the 1730s. Herregården manor house is a large Baroque wooden building with classic elements. The interior design is mainly Baroque and Regency style. The house is filled with 17th- and 18th-century antiques. [95] Herregården from 1677 is considered one of Norway's finest secular Baroque structures. [8] It is one of few baroque architectural monuments representing nobility in Norway. [96] Furthermore, it is one of Norway's largest wooden buildings from 17th century. [25] :22

The Larvik Maritime Museum (Larvik Sjøfartsmuseum) is housed in Larvik's oldest brick building, dating from 1730. Larvik Maritime Museum is located in the old customs house, and is the residence of the local building inspector. This museum displays models of ships, paintings of sailing vessels, and other nautical artifacts to bring the port's maritime history alive. One section of the museum is devoted to the expeditions of Larvik-born Thor Heyerdahl. [97] [98]

Fritzøehus

Fritzøehus is a private estate located in Larvik. The estate has traditionally been associated with various members of the Treschow family and is presently owned by Mille-Marie Treschow. It is Norway's largest privately owned estate. [93] [94]

Churches

The Church of Norway has twelve parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Larvik. It is part of the Larvik prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Tunsberg.

Churches in Larvik
Parish (sokn)Church nameLocation of the churchYear built
Berg Berg Arbeidskirke Helgeroa 2007
Berg Church Berg 1878
Old Berg Church Berg c. 1100
Hedrum Hedrum Church Hedrum c. 1100
Hvarnes Hvarnes Church Hvarnes 1705
Kjose Kjose Church Kjose 1850
Kvelde Kvelde Church Kvelde 1871
Lardal Hem Church Hem c. 1100
Styrvoll Church Styrvollc. 1150
Svarstad Church Svarstad 1657
Larvik Larvik Church Larvik 1677
Langestrand Church Larvik 1818
Nanset Nanset Church Larvik 1974
Stavern Fredriksvern Church Stavern 1756
Tanum Tanum Church Tanum c. 1100
Tjølling Tjølling Church Tjøllingvollen c. 1100
Østre Halsen Østre Halsen Church Halsen in Larvik 1983

Points of interest

Stavern is a summer resort community. Stavern Wasilioff.jpg
Stavern is a summer resort community.
Childhood home of Thor Heyerdahl. Steingata 7.jpg
Childhood home of Thor Heyerdahl.

Notable points of interest include: [99]

Notable people

Thor Heyerdahl sailed 8,000 kilometres (5,000 mi) across the Pacific Ocean during the Kon-Tiki expedition. Thor Heyerdahl.jpg
Thor Heyerdahl sailed 8,000 kilometres (5,000 mi) across the Pacific Ocean during the Kon-Tiki expedition.

Honorary citizens

Explorers

Jens Schou Fabricius Portrett av Jens Schou Fabricius - Oslo Museum - OB.00074.jpg
Jens Schou Fabricius
Lars Gule, 2006 LarsGule.jpg
Lars Gule, 2006

Public Service & public thinking

Herman Wildenwey 35. Herman Wildenwey sic - no-nb digifoto 20160309 00143 blds 02079.jpg
Herman Wildenwey
Anne Holt, 2009 Anne Holt.jpg
Anne Holt, 2009

The arts

Sport

Anette Boe, 2019 20190225 Seefeld 3396 Anette Boe (cropped).jpg
Anette Boe, 2019

Sports teams

Twin towns – sister cities

Larvik has sister city agreements with the following places: [105]

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Vestfold</span> County of Norway

Vestfold is a county and a current electoral district in Eastern Norway. Located on the western shore of the Oslofjord, it borders Buskerud and Telemark counties. The county administration is located in Tønsberg, Norway's oldest city, and the largest city is Sandefjord. With the exception of the city-county of Oslo, Vestfold is the smallest county in Norway by area. Vestfold was until 2019 the only county in which all municipalities had declared Bokmål to be their sole official written form of the Norwegian language.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ringebu</span> Municipality in Innlandet, Norway

is a municipality in Innlandet county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Gudbrandsdal. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Vålebru.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Andebu</span> Former municipality in Norway

Andebu is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 186-square-kilometre (72 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution on 1 January 2017. The area is now part of Sandefjord Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Andebu. Other main villages in Andebu include Høyjord and Kodal.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Stokke</span> Former municipality in Vestfold, Norway

Stokke is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 118-square-kilometre (46 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution on 1 January 2017. The area is now part of Sandefjord Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Stokke. Other main villages in Stokke included Vear, Melsomvik, Storevar, and Valberg.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tjøme</span> Former municipality in Vestfold, Norway

Tjøme is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 39-square-kilometre (15 sq mi) island municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 2018. The area is now part of Færder Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Tjøme. Other villages in Tjøme included Bjørnevåg, Grimestad, Hulebakk, Ormelet, Solvang, Sundene, and Svelvik.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lardal</span> Former municipality in Vestfold, Norway

Lardal is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 278-square-kilometre (107 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 2018. The area is now part of Larvik Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Svarstad. The village of Steinsholt was also part of Lardal.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Siljan, Norway</span> Municipality in Telemark, Norway

Siljan is a municipality in Telemark county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Grenland. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Siljan. Other villages in Siljan include Snurråsen and Øverbø.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gratangen</span> Municipality in Troms, Norway

Gratangen is a municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is part of the traditional region of Central Hålogaland. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Årstein.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Stavern</span> Town in Vestfold county, Norway

Stavern is a town in Larvik Municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The town is located at the mouth of the Larviksfjorden along the Skaggerak coast, about 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) south of the town of Larvik. Historically, Stavern was a self-governing municipality from 1838 until 1988 when it became part of the large Larvik Municipality.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sør-Frøya</span> Former municipality in Norway

Sør-Frøya is a former municipality in the old Sør-Trøndelag county, Norway. The 102-square-kilometre (39 sq mi) municipality existed from 1906 until its dissolution in 1964. Sør-Frøya included the southwestern part of the island of Frøya in what is now the municipality of Frøya in Trøndelag county. The main population center of Sør-Frøya was the village of Titran on the western tip of the island. The main church for the municipality was Hallaren Church which is located in Storhallaren on the southern coast of the island.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sandar, Norway</span> Former municipality in Vestfold, Norway

Sandar is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 120-square-kilometre (46 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 1968. The area is now part of Sandefjord Municipality. The administrative centre was located at Sandar, right by the Sandar Church in what is now the town of Sandefjord.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Valberg, Nordland</span> Former municipality in Norway

Valberg is a former municipality in Nordland county, Norway. The 57-square-kilometre (22 sq mi) municipality existed from 1927 until 1963. The municipality covered the southeastern coast of the island of Vestvågøya in what is now Vestvågøy Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Valberg where Valberg Church is located.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hedrum</span> Former municipality in Vestfold, Norway

Hedrum is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 264-square-kilometre (102 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 1988. The area is now part of Larvik Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Nanset. Other villages in Hedrum include Gjone, Kvelde, Skinmo, and Verningen.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Brunlanes</span> Former municipality in Vestfold, Norway

Brunlanes is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 188-square-kilometre (73 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 1988. The area is now the southwestern part of Larvik Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Tanum. Other villages in Brunlanes include Kjose, Nevlunghavn, Vardåsen, and Helgeroa.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lånke</span> Former municipality in Norway

Lånke was a former municipality in the old Nord-Trøndelag county, Norway. The 185-square-kilometre (71 sq mi) municipality existed from 1902 until its dissolution in 1962. The municipality was located south of the Stjørdalselva river in what is now the south-central part of Stjørdal municipality in Trøndelag county. The administrative centre was located in the village of Hell. The famous Hell Station in the village of Hell is situated in the westernmost part of Lånke. There are two churches in Lånke: Lånke Church and Elvran Chapel. Historically, this parish was also known as Leksdal. Lånke is an area dominated by agriculture and forests.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tjølling</span> Former municipality in Vestfold, Norway

Tjølling is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 70-square-kilometre (27 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 1988. The area is now part of Larvik Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Tjøllingvollen. Other villages in Tjølling included Hem, Rekkevik, and Ula.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Torpa, Norway</span> Former municipality in Oppland, Norway

Torpa is a former municipality in the old Oppland county, Norway. The 561-square-kilometre (217 sq mi) municipality existed from 1914 until its dissolution in 1962. The area is now part of Nordre Land Municipality. The administrative centre was the village at Åmot where the Åmot Church is located. Torpa currently constitutes the northern part of the Nordre Land, bordering the municipalities of Etnedal and Nord-Aurdal in the west, Gausdal, Lillehammer, and Gjøvik in the east.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Støren (municipality)</span> Former municipality in Norway

is a former municipality in the old Sør-Trøndelag county, Norway. The 266-square-kilometre (103 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 1964. The municipality was located in the north-central part of what is now the municipality of Midtre Gauldal in Trøndelag county. The administrative center was the village of Støren where Støren Church is located.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Larvik (town)</span> Town in Larvik, Norway

is a town/city in Larvik Municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The town is the administrative centre of the large municipality which stretches inland for over 50 kilometres (31 mi) from the coast. The town is located near the Skaggerak coast, wedged between the Larviksfjorden to the south, the lake Farris to the north, and the river Lågen along the east side of the town. The town was established in 1671. The town became a self-governing municipality on 1 January 1838 under the formannskapsdistrikt law. The town remained self-governing until 1 January 1988 when it was merged with the neighboring town of Stavern and three neighboring rural municipalities to form a much larger Larvik Municipality.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ramnes Municipality</span> Former municipality in Norway

Ramnes is a former municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The 138-square-kilometre (53 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 2002. The area is now part of Tønsberg Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Ramnes. Other villages in Ramnes included Vivestad, Fon, Bergsåsen, and Linnestad.

References

  1. "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. Bolstad, Erik; Thorsnæs, Geir, eds. (26 January 2023). "Kommunenummer". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget.
  4. Berulfsen, Bjarne (1969). Norsk Uttaleordbok (in Norwegian). Oslo: H. Aschehoug & Co (W Nygaard). p. 194.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Thorsnæs, Geir; Lundbo, Sten; Mæhlum, Lars, eds. (15 August 2023). "Larvik". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget . Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  6. Statistisk sentralbyrå. "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  7. Statistisk sentralbyrå. "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Evensberget, Snorre (2014). DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Norway. Penguin. p. 129. ISBN   9781465432469.
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Lund, Arild; Jørgensen, Charlotte (2001). Larvik. Capella Media. ISBN   9788299606912.
  10. 1 2 3 Bertelsen, Hans Kristian (1998). Bli kjent med Vestfold / Become acquainted with Vestfold. Stavanger Offset AS. pp. 63–65. ISBN   9788290636017.
  11. 1 2 3 4 5 Ham, Anthony; Butler, Stuart (2015). Lonely Planet Norway. Lonely Planet. p. 91. ISBN   9781742202075.
  12. "Farris Bad". VisitNorway.com.
  13. 1 2 Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå. ISBN   9788253746845.
  14. "Fra 26 til 6 kommuner". 21 November 2016.
  15. Ringnes, Sigrid (7 December 2017). "Sjekk den nye filmen fra Larvik og Lardal". Østlands-Posten (in Norwegian).
  16. Rygh, Oluf (1907). Norske gaardnavne: Jarlsberg og Larviks amt (in Norwegian) (6 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. pp. 327 and 367.
  17. 1 2 3 "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 10 November 2023.
  18. "Larvik, Vestfold (Norway)". Flags of the World. Retrieved 10 November 2023.
  19. "Godkjenning av våpen og flagg". Lovdata.no (in Norwegian). Norges kommunal- og arbeidsdepartementet. 17 March 1989. Retrieved 10 November 2023.
  20. "Larvik kommune, våpen". Digitalarkivet (in Norwegian). Arkivverket. Retrieved 10 November 2023.
  21. "Larvik kommune". Digitalarkivet (in Norwegian). Arkivverket. Retrieved 10 November 2023.
  22. "Larviks nye kommunevåpen er klart". Bokebloggen.no (in Norwegian). 6 April 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  23. "Profilmanual 2022" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Larvik kommune. Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  24. "Attractions". VisitVestfold.com.
  25. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Krohn-Holm, Jan W. (1971). Larvik: Grevens By (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Leif Holktedahls Forlag. OCLC   13071070.
  26. 1 2 3 Taylor-Wilkie, Doreen (2018). Insight Guides Norway. Insight. pp. 157 and 304. ISBN   9781780052106.
  27. Skre, Dagfinn (2007). Kaupang in Skiringssal (in Norwegian). Aarhus University Press. p. 13. ISBN   9788779342590.
  28. Evensberget, Snorre (2012). DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Norway. Penguin. p. 125. ISBN   9780756693305.
  29. "Unike dokument viser Larviks danske hemmelegheit". 26 June 2021.
  30. Tønnessen, Johan Nicolay; Johnsen, Arne Odd (1982). The History of Modern Whaling. University of California Press. p. 84. ISBN   9780520039735.
  31. Hansen, Tore; Vabo, Signy Irene, eds. (20 September 2022). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget . Retrieved 14 October 2022.
  32. "Kommunestyrevalg 2023 - Vestfold". Valgdirektoratet . Retrieved 1 February 2024.
  33. "Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Vestfold og Telemark". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  34. "Kommunestyrevalg 2015 - Vestfold". Valg Direktoratet.
  35. 1 2 3 4 "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  36. "Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Vestfold". Valg Direktoratet.
  37. "Kommunestyrevalget 1999" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 2000. ISBN   8253748531. ISSN   0332-8023.
  38. "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996. ISBN   8253743351. ISSN   0332-8023.
  39. "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. ISBN   8253737939. ISSN   0332-8023.
  40. "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. ISBN   8253726325. ISSN   0332-8023.
  41. "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. ISBN   8253720378. ISSN   0332-8023.
  42. "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. ISBN   8253710836. ISSN   0332-8023.
  43. "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977. ISBN   8253705646.
  44. "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973. ISBN   8253701144.
  45. "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967.
  46. "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964.
  47. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960.
  48. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957.
  49. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952.
  50. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948.
  51. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947.
  52. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938.
  53. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1934" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1935.
  54. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1931" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1932.
  55. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1928" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1929.
  56. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1925" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1926.
  57. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1922" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1923.
  58. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1919" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1920.
  59. Nyhus, Per (1981). Dengang det het Laurvig (in Norwegian). Larvik: Østlands-Posten. p. 237. ISBN   8299083508.
  60. Larviks historie (in Norwegian). Larvik: Larvik kommune. 1963.
  61. Nyhus, Per (1999). Larvik A-Å (in Norwegian). Larvik: Østlands-Posten. ISBN   8299083532.
  62. "Ny ordfører i Larvik". NRK (in Norwegian). 12 September 2023. Retrieved 1 February 2024.
  63. "Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, by immigration category, country background and percentages of the population". Statistics Norway . Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  64. 1 2 3 "Kommunefakta" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway . Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  65. 1 2 "Stavern by - smilehullet ved Skagerak" (in Norwegian). Visit Stavern.
  66. Nickel, Phyllis; Valderhaug, Hans Jakob (2017). Norwegian Cruising Guide—Vol 2: Sweden, West Coast and Norway, Swedish Border to Bergen. Attainable Adventure Cruising Ltd. p. 98. ISBN   9780995893962.
  67. Engel, Lyle Kenyon (1963). Scandinavia: A Simon & Schuster Travel Guide. Cornerstone Library. p. 147.
  68. Larsen, Erlend (2011). På Tur i Vestfold del 2 (in Norwegian). E-forlag. p. 238. ISBN   9788293057222.
  69. 1 2 Ferguson-Kosinski, Laverne (2015). Europe by Eurail 2016: Touring Europe by Train. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 386. ISBN   9781493012763.
  70. Statistisk sentralbyrå (1 January 2022). "Urban settlements. Population and area, by municipality".
  71. 1 2 Davidsen, Roger (2008). Et Sted i Sandefjord (in Norwegian). Sandar Historielag. p. 139. ISBN   9788299456753.
  72. Larsen, Erlend (2016). Tre kommuner blir til én (in Norwegian). Erlend Larsen Forlag. p. 13. ISBN   9788293057277.
  73. Lundbo, Sten; Mæhlum, Lars, eds. (15 August 2023). "Sandefjord". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget . Retrieved 8 November 2023.
  74. Jøranlid, Marianne (1996). 40 trivelige turer i Sandefjord og omegn (in Norwegian). Vett Viten. pp. 114–117. ISBN   9788241202841.
  75. Solberg, Morten Fredheim (11 October 2014). "Her er Sandefjords ytterste nøgne ø". Sandefjords Blad .
  76. Tollnes, Ivar; Akselsen, Olaf (1994). Sandefjord: Den lille storbyen (in Norwegian). Sandefjords Blad. p. 140. ISBN   9788299070447.
  77. "Mann i 70-årene omkom". Aftenposten.no (in Norwegian).
  78. Ebbesen, Jorgen Tandberg (2018). The Sulphureous Bath at Sandefjord in Norway. Sagwan Press. p. 10. ISBN   9781297731068.
  79. "Goksjø". SandefjordBy.no (in Norwegian).
  80. 1 2 3 Børresen, Svein E. (2004). Vestfoldboka: en reise i kultur og natur (in Norwegian). Skagerrak forlag. ISBN   9788292284070.
  81. 1 2 Aadnevik, Kjell-Einar (2019). Turguide til Larvik og Omegn. Dreyers forlag. pp. 54 and 274. ISBN   9788282654418.
  82. 1 2 Schandy, Tom; Helgesen, Tom (2012). Naturperler i Vestfold (in Norwegian). Forlaget Tom & Tom v/Schandy. pp. 192 and 227. ISBN   9788292916148.
  83. "Bøkeskogen | Larvik, Norway Attractions".
  84. "Mølen". AtlasObscura.com.
  85. "Mølen". VisitVestfold.com.
  86. Lundbo, Sten; Thorsnæs, Geir, eds. (25 January 2023). "Vestfold". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget . Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  87. "Jakt" (in Norwegian). Larvik kommune.
  88. "Things to see in Larvik". Frommer's.
  89. "Larvik Museum". VisitNorway.com.
  90. Arnesen, Catherine, ed. (21 May 2023). "Larvik Museum". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget . Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  91. "Verkensgården | Larvik, Norway Attractions".
  92. Antonsen, Robin, ed. (9 November 2023). "Treschow-Fritzøe AS". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget . Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  93. 1 2 "Fritzøehus". Østlands-Posten . 18 October 2014.
  94. 1 2 "Fritzøehus - Norges største privatbolig". StavernGuiden.no (in Norwegian).
  95. "Herregården". Kulturnett.no (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 29 June 2011.
  96. "Herregården in Larvik". VisitVestfold.com (in Norwegian).
  97. "Larvik Maritime Museum". Innovation Norway. Archived from the original on 17 July 2011.
  98. Rabbevåg, Frode, ed. (1 August 2023). "Larvik Sjøfartsmuseum". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget . Retrieved 11 November 2023.
  99. "Attractions". VisitVestfold.com.
  100. "Minnehallen". StavernGuiden.no.
  101. "Larvik church". VisitVestfold.com.
  102. Nordheim, Lasse (19 April 2014). "Tar gjerne turen til Larvik oftere". Østlands-Posten (in Norwegian). Retrieved 18 April 2017.
  103. Biography for Mari Bjørgan at IMDb. Retrieved 30 November 2020
  104. Biography for Bjørn Lynne at IMDb. Retrieved 30 November 2020
  105. "Vennskapskommuner". larvik.kommune.no (in Norwegian). Larvik Kommune. Retrieved 31 January 2021.