Laurent Fabius

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  1. Meisler, Stanley (23 January 1986). "Greenpeace Affair Tarnished Fabius : French Political Star's Meteoric Rise and Fall". Los Angeles Times . Archived from the original on 6 November 2012. Retrieved 18 May 2011.
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  3. Gino Raymond, Historical Dictionary of France (2008) pp 127–128.
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  5. Gay and lesbian communities the world over by Rita James Simon and Alison Brooks
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  17. Evening Mail – Monday 23 September 1985
  18. "1985: Agents plead guilty in Rainbow Warrior trial". BBC. 3 November 1985. Archived from the original on 14 March 2016. Retrieved 16 February 2016.
  19. CV at National Assembly website Archived 30 September 2007 at the Wayback Machine (in French).
  20. "Des Syriens demandent réparation à Fabius". FIGARO. 10 December 2014. Archived from the original on 26 October 2017. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
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  25. "Honorary British Awards to Foreign Nationals – 2014" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 25 July 2019. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  26. "Real Decreto 212/2015, de 23 de marzo, por el que se concede la Gran Cruz de la Orden de Isabel la Católica a las personas de la República Francesa que se citan" (PDF). BOE (Spanish Official Journal). 24 March 2015. Archived (PDF) from the original on 16 April 2016. Retrieved 18 February 2016.

Further reading

Laurent Fabius
Laurent Fabius and Catherine McKenna (22913103711) (cropped).jpg
President of the Constitutional Council
Assumed office
8 March 2016
Political offices
Preceded by Minister of the Budget
1981–1983
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Industry
1983–1984
Succeeded by
Minister of Research
1983–1984
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of France
1984–1986
Succeeded by
Preceded by President of the National Assembly
1988–1992
Succeeded by
Preceded by President of the National Assembly
1997–2000
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Finance
2000–2002
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Foreign Affairs
2012–2016
Succeeded by
Party political offices
Preceded by First Secretary of the Socialist Party
1992–1993
Succeeded by
Legal offices
Preceded by President of the Constitutional Council
2016–present
Incumbent
Order of precedence
Preceded byas Secretary of State for Francophonie Order of precedence of France
Former Prime Minister
Succeeded byas Former Prime Minister

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