Laxapana Dam

Last updated
Laxapana Dam
UG-LK Photowalk - 2018-03-24 - Laxapana Dam (3).jpg
Sri Lanka location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location of Laxapana Dam in Sri Lanka
Country Sri Lanka
Location Laxapana
Central Province
Coordinates 06°55′08″N80°29′22″E / 6.91889°N 80.48944°E / 6.91889; 80.48944 Coordinates: 06°55′08″N80°29′22″E / 6.91889°N 80.48944°E / 6.91889; 80.48944
Purpose Power
StatusOperational
Opening dateApril 1969 (1969-04)
Owner(s) Ceylon Electricity Board
Dam and spillways
Type of dam Gravity dam
Impounds Maskeliya Oya
Reservoir
CreatesLaxapana Reservoir
Maximum length300 m (980 ft)
Maximum width130 m (430 ft)
Polpitiya Power Station
Coordinates 06°58′40″N80°27′24″E / 6.97778°N 80.45667°E / 6.97778; 80.45667
Turbines 2 × 37.50 MW
Installed capacity 75 MW

The Laxapana Dam is a gravity dam built across the Maskeliya Oya, 2.8 km (1.7 mi) downstream of the Laxapana Falls, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. [1]

Gravity dam A specific type of dam that uses mass to counteract water pressure

A gravity dam is a dam constructed from concrete or stone masonry and designed to hold back water by primarily using the weight of the material alone to resist the horizontal pressure of water pushing against it. Gravity dams are designed so that each section of the dam is stable and independent of any other dam section.

Maskeliya Oya river in Sri Lanka

The Maskeliya Oya is a major upstream tributary of the Kelani River. The tributary measures approximately 40 km (25 mi) in length, originating from the hills of the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary, before passing through the Maskeliya Reservoir. Maskeliya Oya converges with the Kehelgamu Oya at Kalugala, forming the 100 km (62 mi) long Kelani River. The river is heavily used for hydroelectric power generation.

Laxapana Falls

Laxapana Falls is 126 m (413 ft) high and the 8th highest waterfall in Sri Lanka and 625th highest waterfall in the world. It is situated in Maskeliya area in Nuwara Eliya District, about 16 km (9.9 mi) from Maskeliya town on Maskeliya-Norton Bridge road, in a village called Kiriwan Eliya. It is formed by Maskeliya Oya near the confluence of Kehelgamu Oya and Maskeliya Oya which forms Kelani River. The falls gives its name to twin hydroelectric power stations, Old Laxapana Power Station which generates 50 MW of electricity and New Laxapana Power Station which generates 100 MW.

Contents

Power station and reservoir

The dam creates the Laxapana Reservoir, which is sustained from water flowing in from the Kelani River, and discharged water from the Old Laxapana Hydroelectric Power Stations and New Laxapana Hydroelectric Power Stations. The Old Laxapana and New Laxapana hydroelectric power stations belongs to the Norton Dam and Canyon Dam respectively, delivered via penstocks.

Norton Dam dam in Norton Bridge,Central Province

The Norton Dam is a gravity dam built across the Kehelgamu Oya, which is a major tributary to the Kelani River. The dam is built at Norton Bridge, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka.

Canyon Dam (Sri Lanka) dam in Laxapana Falls,Central Province

The Canyon Dam is a large arch-gravity dam built across the Maskeliya Oya, 4.5 km (2.8 mi) upstream of the iconic Laxapana Falls, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. The associated power station plays a major role in the national power grid, due to its significant output. The dam is surrounded by steel structures of the substation.

Penstock Intake structure that controls water flow to turbines or sewerage systems

A penstock is a sluice or gate or intake structure that controls water flow, or an enclosed pipe that delivers water to hydro turbines and sewerage systems. The term is inherited from the earlier technology of mill ponds and watermills.

The combined hydro resource of the Laxapana Reservoir is fed into another penstock to a further 7.8 km (4.8 mi) downstream for utilization of power generation at the Polpitiya Power Station, located at 06°58′40″N80°27′24″E / 6.97778°N 80.45667°E / 6.97778; 80.45667 (Polpitiya Hydroelectric Power Station) . The power station, which is also called as the Samanala Hydroelectric Power Station, consists of two generation units rated at 37.50 MW each, both of which were commissioned in April 1969. [1] [2] [3]

Upstream view of the Laxapana Dam and Reservoir. The buildings located immediately upstream are the Old Laxapana Power Station (white roof) and the New Laxapana Power Station (blue roof), belonging to the Norton Dam and Canyon Dam, respectively. UG-LK Photowalk - 2018-03-24 - Laxapana Dam (5).jpg
Upstream view of the Laxapana Dam and Reservoir. The buildings located immediately upstream are the Old Laxapana Power Station (white roof) and the New Laxapana Power Station (blue roof), belonging to the Norton Dam and Canyon Dam, respectively.

See also

Related Research Articles

Samanala Dam dam in Balangoda

The Samanala Dam is a dam primarily used for hydroelectric power generation in Sri Lanka. Commissioned in 1992, the Samanalawewa Project is the second-largest hydroelectric scheme in the country, producing 405 GWh of energy annually. It was built with financial support from Japan and the United Kingdom. It is notable for a large leak on its right bank. Power production continues as planned despite the leakage, and the water from the leak now provides two thirds of the water issued by the reservoir for agriculture in downstream areas.

Electricity sector in Sri Lanka

The electricity sector in Sri Lanka has a national grid which is primarily powered by hydro power and thermal heat, with sources such as photovoltaics and wind power in early stages of deployment. Although potential sites are being identified, other power sources such as geothermal, nuclear, peat, solar thermal and wave power are not used in the power generation process for the national grid.

Upper Kotmale Dam dam in Talawakele, Nuwara Eliya

The Upper Kotmale Dam is located in Talawakele, within the Nuwara Eliya District, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. The dam feeds the third largest hydroelectric power station in the country.

D. J. Wimalasurendra d.j.wimalasurenda sinhala page

Devapura Jayasena Wimalasurendra was a Sri Lankan engineer and statesman. He played a prominent role in the establishment of hydropower in Sri Lanka and is known as the "Father of Hydropower" and was a member of the State Council of Ceylon.

Broadlands Dam dam in Kitulgala

The Broadlands Dam is a 35 MW run-of-the-river hydroelectric complex currently under construction in Kitulgala, Sri Lanka. The project is expected to be completed in 2020, and will consist of two dams, and a power station further downstream.

Rantembe Dam dam in Rantembe, Central Province

The Rantembe Dam is a 52-megawatt hydroelectric gravity dam at Rantembe, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. Construction of the dam began in January 1987, and was completed in April 1990 as scheduled. The dam was constructed by the German 'Joint Venture Randenigala'; a different German joint venture has built the [Randenigala Dam]], further upstream.

Bowatenna Dam dam in Bowatenna

The Bowatenna Dam is a 100 ft (30 m) high gravity dam at Bowatenna, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. The dam was built in June 1981, and is used primarily for irrigation. A 40 MW power station is also constructed 5,800 ft (1,800 m) downstream, for hydroelectric power generation.

Maskeliya Dam dam in Maskeliya, Central Province

The Maskeliya Dam is a large gravity dam at Maskeliya, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. Along with the Castlereigh Dam, the dams are the highest point and beginning of the Laxapana Hydropower Complex, involving a number of dams, penstocks, and hydroelectric power stations. The dam creates the Maskeliya Reservoir over the route of Maskeliya Oya, a major tributary of the Kelani River, which is the 4th longest in the country.

Castlereigh Dam dam in Hatton, Central Province

The Castlereigh Dam is a gravity dam built across the Kehelgamu Oya, a major tributary to the Kelani River, approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) south-west of Hatton, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka.

Polgolla Barrage dam in Polgolla, Central Province

The Polgolla Barrage, is a barrage built across the Mahaweli River at Polgolla, in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. The barrage is used to increase the volume of water, for transfer to the hydroelectric power station located 8 km (5 mi) north, via penstock.

Kehelgamu Oya river in Sri Lanka

The Kehelgamu Oya is a major upstream tributary of the Kelani River. The tributary measures 50 km (31 mi) in length, originating from the hills of the Horton Plains National Park, before passing through the Castlereigh Reservoir. Kehelgamu Oya converges with the Maskeliya Oya at Kalugala, forming the 100 km (62 mi) long Kelani River. The river is heavily used for hydroelectric power generation.

Udawalawe Dam dam in Udawalawe

The Udawalawe Dam is a large irrigation dam in Udawalawe, in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka. The dam consists of an embankment section and a gravity section, combining the total dam length to approximately 3.9 km (2.4 mi). The dam is also used for hydroelectric power generation, powering three 2 MW units, commissioned in April 1969.

Gal Oya Dam dam in Gal Oya National Park

The Gal Oya Dam is an embankment dam in the Uva Province of Sri Lanka. The dam creates one of the largest and most iconic reservoirs in the country, the Gal Oya Reservoir. Water from the reservoir is used primarily for irrigation in the Uva and Eastern provinces, in addition to powering a small hydroelectric power station. Construction of the dam and reservoir began in August 24, 1949, completing four years later in 1953.

Nilambe Dam dam in Nilambe, Central Province

The Nilambe Dam is a small hydroelectric dam build across the Nilambe River, measuring approximately 70 m (230 ft) in length. Water from the Nilambe Dam is transferred to the 3.2-megawatt Nilambe Power Station through a penstock measuring approximately 2.8 km (1.7 mi). The power station consists of two 1.6 MW generating units, which were commissioned in July 1988.

Laxapana Power Station may refer to:

References

  1. 1 2 "CEB Hydropower Generation". Ceylon Electricity Board. Archived from the original on 18 January 2014. Retrieved 18 January 2014.
  2. "CEB Generation Details: Laxapana Complex". Ceylon Electricity Board. Archived from the original on 16 January 2014. Retrieved 18 January 2014.
  3. "Hydroelectric Power Plants in Sri Lanka". Industcards.com. Retrieved 19 January 2014.