Lea County, New Mexico

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Coordinates: 32°48′N103°25′W / 32.80°N 103.42°W / 32.80; -103.42

Contents

Lea County
Lea County New Mexico Court House.jpg
Lea County Courthouse in Lovington
Map of New Mexico highlighting Lea County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of New Mexico
New Mexico in United States.svg
New Mexico's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 32°48′N103°25′W / 32.8°N 103.42°W / 32.8; -103.42
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of New Mexico.svg  New Mexico
FoundedMarch 17, 1917
Seat Lovington
Largest city Hobbs
Area
  Total4,394 sq mi (11,380 km2)
  Land4,391 sq mi (11,370 km2)
  Water3.3 sq mi (9 km2)  0.07%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2018)
69,611
  Density15/sq mi (6/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 2nd
Website www.leacounty.net

Lea County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 64,727. [1] Because of oil lease sales in September 2018, the population is expected to double. [2]

Its county seat is Lovington. [3] It is both west and north of the Texas state line.

Lea County comprises the Hobbs, NM Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 4,394 square miles (11,380 km2), of which 4,391 square miles (11,370 km2) is land and 3.3 square miles (8.5 km2) (0.07%) is water. [4] Lea County is located in the southeast corner of New Mexico and borders Texas to the south and east.

The Permian Basin, 250 miles wide and 350 miles long, underlies Lea County and adjacent Eddy County as well as a big piece of West Texas. It produces 500,00 barrels of crude a day, and this number was expected to double in 2019. The shale in this basin lies 3,000 to 15,000 feet below the surface, below a salt bed and a groundwater aquifer. [2]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1920 3,545
1930 6,14473.3%
1940 21,154244.3%
1950 30,71745.2%
1960 53,42973.9%
1970 49,554−7.3%
1980 55,99313.0%
1990 55,765−0.4%
2000 55,511−0.5%
2010 64,72716.6%
Est. 201869,611 [5] 7.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2016 [1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, [10] there were 55,511 people, 19,699 households, and 14,715 families living in the county. The population density was 13 people per square mile (5/km²). There were 23,405 housing units at an average density of 5 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 67.13% White, 4.37% Black or African American, 0.99% Native American, 0.39% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 23.81% from other races, and 3.27% from two or more races. 39.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 19,699 households out of which 39.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.80% were married couples living together, 12.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.30% were non-families. 22.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the county, the population was spread out with 30.10% under the age of 18, 10.10% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 20.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 100.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,799, and the median income for a family was $34,665. Males had a median income of $32,005 versus $20,922 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,184. About 17.30% of families and 21.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.00% of those under age 18 and 14.90% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 64,727 people, 22,236 households, and 16,260 families living in the county. [11] The population density was 14.7 inhabitants per square mile (5.7/km2). There were 24,919 housing units at an average density of 5.7 per square mile (2.2/km2). [12] The racial makeup of the county was 75.0% white, 4.1% black or African American, 1.2% American Indian, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 16.6% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 51.1% of the population. [11] In terms of ancestry, 9.3% were German, 7.6% were Irish, 7.2% were English, and 6.3% were American. [13]

Of the 22,236 households, 41.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.8% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 26.9% were non-families, and 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.30. The median age was 31.9 years. [11]

The median income for a household in the county was $43,910 and the median income for a family was $48,980. Males had a median income of $44,714 versus $25,847 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,637. About 15.2% of families and 17.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.5% of those under age 18 and 11.1% of those age 65 or over. [14]

Transportation

Airports

The following public-use airports are located in the county: [15]

Politics

In the 2004 Presidential election, Lea County was the top New Mexico county, as far as percentage, for Republican George W. Bush. He beat John Kerry 79%-20%. In 2008, the Republican candidate John McCain beat Democratic candidate Barack Obama by a wide but slightly smaller margin, 72% to 27%. [16]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [17]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 70.6% 12,49522.2% 3,9307.3% 1,287
2012 73.8% 12,54824.0% 4,0802.3% 387
2008 71.6% 13,34727.4% 5,1081.0% 190
2004 79.4% 14,43020.1% 3,6460.6% 105
2000 71.3% 10,15727.0% 3,8551.7% 244
1996 52.2% 7,66136.8% 5,39311.0% 1,612
1992 48.6% 7,92130.9% 5,04720.5% 3,343
1988 65.4% 11,30934.0% 5,8790.7% 115
1984 75.3% 14,56923.6% 4,5581.2% 230
1980 66.3% 10,72730.9% 5,0062.8% 452
1976 56.8% 8,77342.3% 6,5330.9% 135
1972 76.4% 12,47821.0% 3,4292.6% 424
1968 48.2% 7,41530.9% 4,75120.9% 3,216
1964 44.1% 7,03355.6% 8,8620.3% 53
1960 48.8% 7,54850.5% 7,8060.8% 120
1956 47.7% 5,66151.7% 6,1400.7% 78
1952 47.5% 4,73852.2% 5,2040.3% 29
1948 21.1% 1,27378.1% 4,7080.7% 44
1944 29.4% 1,22770.5% 2,9380.1% 3
1940 23.0% 1,28676.8% 4,2950.2% 11
1936 12.2% 54987.0% 3,9050.8% 37
1932 9.8% 27186.0% 2,3714.1% 114
1928 53.0% 53746.8% 4740.3% 3
1924 18.8% 13875.0% 5526.3% 46
1920 25.2% 25572.5% 7332.3% 23

Communities

Cities

Town

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Notable people

See also

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Lovington, New Mexico City in New Mexico, United States

Lovington is a city in and the county seat of Lea County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 11,009 at the 2010 census.

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References

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  2. 1 2 John L. Smith (December 29, 2018). "Oil: Black gold or prime polluter?: Oil leases bring jobs, strains, to southeast New Mexico". Gallup Independent. Searchlight New Mexico. p. 1.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 1, 2015. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved December 23, 2019.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  10. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  12. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  13. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  14. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  15. Public and Private Airports, Lea County, New Mexico
  16. "County Results – Election Center 2008 – Elections & Politics from CNN.com". www.cnn.com. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  17. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 1, 2018.