Lectionary 150

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Lectionary 150
New Testament manuscript
Codex Harcleianus.PNG
John 1:18 in Codex Harleianus
NameHarley MS 5598
Text Gospels
Date995
Script Greek
FoundJohn Covel in 1677 at Constantinople
Now at British Library
Size35.2 by 26.7 cm
Handbeautifully written

Lectionary 150, designated by siglum 150 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), is also known as Codex Harleianus. It is a Greek manuscript of the New Testament, on vellum leaves and one of four extant Greek lectionaries with explicit dates from before 1000. [1]

Manuscript document written by hand

A manuscript was, traditionally, any document that is written by hand — or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten — as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way. More recently, the term has come to be understood to further include any written, typed, or word-processed copy of an author's work, as distinguished from its rendition as a printed version of the same. Before the arrival of printing, all documents and books were manuscripts. Manuscripts are not defined by their contents, which may combine writing with mathematical calculations, maps, explanatory figures or illustrations. Manuscripts may be in book form, scrolls or in codex format. Illuminated manuscripts are enriched with pictures, border decorations, elaborately embossed initial letters or full-page illustrations.

New Testament Second division of the Christian biblical canon

The New Testament is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first being the Old Testament. The New Testament discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture.

Contents

Description

The manuscript is written in compressed Greek Uncial letters, on 374 parchment leaves (35.2 cm by 26.7 cm), in 2 columns per page, 21 lines per page, with ornaments. [1] The capital letters and nomina sacra are in red ink. The codex includes ten leaves of paper containing a series of Lessons from the Gospels, John, Matthew and the Luke lectionary (Evangelistarium). The image shows the text of John 1:18.

Nomina sacra The abbreviation of several frequently occurring divine names or titles, especially in Greek manuscripts of Holy Scripture

In Christian scribal practice, nomina sacra is the abbreviation of several frequently occurring divine names or titles, especially in Greek manuscripts of Holy Scripture. A nomen sacrum consists of two or more letters from the original word spanned by an overline.

Gospel description of the life of Jesus, canonical or apocryphal

Gospel originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out. While some place the writing of the four canonical gospels—Matthew, Mark, Luke and John—as early as between AD 50 and 60, most scholars maintain that they were probably written between AD 66 and 110, building on older sources and traditions, and each gospel has its own distinctive understanding of Jesus and his divine role. All four are anonymous, and it is almost certain that none were written by an eyewitness. They are the main source of information on the life of Jesus as searched for in the quest for the historical Jesus. Modern scholars are cautious of relying on them unquestioningly, but critical study attempts to distinguish the original ideas of Jesus from those of the later authors. Many non-canonical gospels were also written, all later than the four, and all, like them, advocating the particular theological views of their authors.

Gospel of John Book of the New Testament

The Gospel of John is the fourth of the canonical gospels. The work is anonymous, although it identifies an unnamed "disciple whom Jesus loved" as the source of its traditions. It is closely related in style and content to the three Johannine epistles, and most scholars treat the four books, along with the Book of Revelation, as a single corpus of Johannine literature, albeit not from the same author.

It is one of the most beautiful lectionary codices, with a scribal date of 27 May 995 A.D. 'It is a most splendid specimen of the uncial class of Evangelistaria, and its text presents many instructive variations.' [2] It also contains musical notation.

Musical notation graphic writing of musical parameters

Music notation or musical notation is any system used to visually represent aurally perceived music played with instruments or sung by the human voice through the use of written, printed, or otherwise-produced symbols.

History

In the colophon (folio 376v), the book is signed by presbyter Constantine and dated 27 May 995 Lectionary 150 (British Library Harley MS 5598) f 376v colophon - written by presbyter Constantine, dated 27 May 995.jpg
In the colophon (folio 376v), the book is signed by presbyter Constantine and dated 27 May 995

According to the colophon it was written by a presbyter called Constantine. [3] The manuscript came from Constantinople. In 1677 John Covel, chaplain of the English embassy in Constantinople, purchased this manuscript. It was shown by him to John Mill (1645-1707), [4] in London. [2] From Covell it was purchased – together with other manuscripts – by Robert Harley, Earl of Oxford. [2]

Colophon (publishing) brief statement of a books own information, such as publisher, location, and date of publication

In publishing, a colophon is a brief statement containing information about the publication of a book such as the place of publication, the publisher, and the date of publication. A colophon may also be emblematic or pictorial in nature. Colophons were formerly printed at the ends of books, but in modern works they are usually located at the verso of the title-leaf.

Constantinople capital city of the Eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire, the Latin and the Ottoman Empire

Constantinople was the capital city of the Roman Empire (330–395), of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, of the brief Crusader state known as the Latin Empire (1204–1261) and of the Ottoman Empire (1453–1923). In 1923 the capital of Turkey, the successor state of the Ottoman Empire, was moved to Ankara and the name Constantinople was officially changed to Istanbul. The city is located in what is now the European side and the core of modern Istanbul. The city is still referred to as Constantinople in Greek-speaking sources.

John Covel British scientist and priest

John Covel was a clergyman and scientist who became Master of Christ's College, Cambridge and vice-chancellor of the University.

It was collated by Bloomfield and examined by Woide. [3]

Samuel Thomas Bloomfield was an English clergyman and Biblical textual critic. His Greek New Testament was widely used in England and the United States.

Carl Gottfried Woide Polish orientalist and biblical scholar

Carl Gottfried Woide, also known in England as Charles Godfrey Woide, was an Orientalist, a biblical scholar and a pastor.

The manuscript is often cited in the critical editions of the Greek New Testament (UBS3). [5] It is not cited in UBS4. [6]

The codex now is located in the British Library (Harley MS 5598). [1]

See also

Notes and references

  1. 1 2 3 Aland, Kurt; M. Welte; B. Köster; K. Junack (1994). Kurzgefasste Liste der griechischen Handschriften des Neues Testaments. Berlin, New York: Walter de Gruyter. p. 227. ISBN   3-11-011986-2.
  2. 1 2 3 Scrivener, Frederick Henry Ambrose; Edward Miller (1894). A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament . 1 (4th ed.). London: George Bell & Sons. pp. 336–337.
  3. 1 2 Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments. 1. Leipzig. p. 466.
  4. J. Mill, Novum Testamentum, Prolegomena § 1426.
  5. The Greek New Testament, ed. K. Aland, A. Black, C. M. Martini, B. M. Metzger, and A. Wikgren, in cooperation with INTF, United Bible Societies, 3rd edition, (Stuttgart 1983), p. XXVIII.
  6. The Greek New Testament, ed. B. Aland, K. Aland, J. Karavidopoulos, C. M. Martini, and B. M. Metzger, in cooperation with INTF, United Bible Societies, 4th revised edition, (United Bible Societies, Stuttgart 2001), p. 21, ISBN   978-3-438-05110-3.

Bibliography

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