Lee Moran

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Lee Moran
Lee Moran 1917.jpg
Moran in 1917
Born(1888-06-23)June 23, 1888
DiedApril 24, 1961(1961-04-24) (aged 72)
OccupationActor
Director
Screenwriter
Years active1912-1935

Lee Moran (June 23, 1888 April 24, 1961) was an American actor, film director, and screenwriter. [1] He transcended the silent film era of motion pictures to the talkies. Moran appeared in 462 films, directed 109 and wrote for 92 between 1912 and 1935. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, and died from a heart ailment in Woodland Hills, California. Moran was often paired with actor Eddie Lyons and the two made several comedic films together.

Film director Person who controls the artistic and dramatic aspects of a film production

A film director is a person who directs the making of a film. A film director controls a film's artistic and dramatic aspects and visualizes the screenplay while guiding the technical crew and actors in the fulfilment of that vision. The director has a key role in choosing the cast members, production design, and the creative aspects of filmmaking. Under European Union law, the director is viewed as the author of the film.

Screenwriter writer who writes for TV, films, comics and games

A screenplay writer, scriptwriter or scenarist is a writer who practices the craft of screenwriting, writing screenplays on which mass media, such as films, television programs and video games, are based.

Silent film Film with no synchronized recorded dialogue

A silent film is a film with no synchronized recorded sound. In silent films for entertainment, the plot may be conveyed by the use of title cards, written indications of the plot and key dialogue lines. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as film itself, but because of the technical challenges involved, the introduction of synchronized dialogue became practical only in the late 1920s with the perfection of the Audion amplifier tube and the advent of the Vitaphone system. The term "silent film" is a misnomer, as these films were almost always accompanied by live sounds. During the silent-film era that existed from the mid-1890s to the late 1920s, a pianist, theater organist—or even, in large cities, a small orchestra—would often play music to accompany the films. Pianists and organists would play either from sheet music, or improvisation. Sometimes a person would even narrate the intertitle cards for the audience. Though at the time the technology to synchronize sound with the video did not exist, music was seen as an essential part of the viewing experience.

Contents

Selected filmography

Some Shimmiers (1920) with Eddie Lyons and Lee Moran. Length 15:11. Collection EYE Film Institute Netherlands.
<i>When the Heart Calls</i> 1912 film directed by Al Christie

When the Heart Calls is a 1912 American silent era short western comedy film starring Lee Moran, Russell Bassett, Louise Glaum, and Victoria Forde.

Almost a Rescue is a 1913 American short comedy film featuring Fatty Arbuckle.

An Elephant on His Hands is a 1913 American silent short comedy film directed by Al Christie and starring Eddie Lyons, Lee Moran and Lon Chaney. The film is now considered lost.

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References

  1. "Lee Moran". NY Times. Retrieved May 1, 2015.