Leo Tover

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Leo Tover, A.S.C. (December 6, 1902 – December 30, 1964) was an American cinematographer, twice nominated for Academy Awards for his work on The Heiress (1949) and Hold Back the Dawn (1941). His other credits include the silent version of The Great Gatsby as well as The Day the Earth Stood Still and Payment on Demand , both released in 1951.

He was born in New Haven, Connecticut. During World War II, Tover served in the United States Army Signal Corps Photographic Center alongside fellow cinematographers Gerald Hirschfeld and Stanley Cortez. He died in Los Angeles, California.

Partial filmography

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