Leonard Fein

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Leonard Fein
Born(1934-07-01)July 1, 1934
Brooklyn, New York, United States
DiedAugust 14, 2014(2014-08-14) (aged 80)
Manhattan, New York, United States
OccupationWriter, professor, publisher

Leonard J. Fein (July 1, 1934 – August 14, 2014), also known as Leibel Fein, was an American activist, writer, and teacher specializing in Jewish social themes. [1]

Contents

Academic career

After studying at the University of Chicago, Fein later received his PhD from Michigan State University.

University of Chicago Private research university in Chicago, Illinois, United States

The University of Chicago is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois. Founded in 1890 by John D. Rockefeller, the school is located on a 217-acre campus in Chicago's Hyde Park neighborhood, near Lake Michigan. The University of Chicago holds top-ten positions in various national and international rankings.

Michigan State University Public research university in East Lansing, Michigan, United States

Michigan State University (MSU) is a public research university in East Lansing, Michigan. MSU was founded in 1855 and served as a model for land-grant universities later created under the Morrill Act of 1862. The university was founded as the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan, one of the country's first institutions of higher education to teach scientific agriculture. After the introduction of the Morrill Act, the college became coeducational and expanded its curriculum beyond agriculture. Today, MSU is one of the largest universities in the United States and has approximately 563,000 living alumni worldwide.

Fein taught Political Science at MIT in the 1960s. He was then also the Deputy Director of the MIT/Harvard Joint Center for Urban Studies. He joined the Brandeis University faculty in 1970 as a Professor of Politics and Social Policy and the Klutznick Professor of Contemporary Jewish Studies.

Brandeis University private research university in Waltham, Massachusetts

Brandeis University is an American private research university in Waltham, Massachusetts, 9 miles (14 km) west of Boston. Founded in 1948 as a non-sectarian, coeducational institution sponsored by the Jewish community, Brandeis was established on the site of the former Middlesex University. The university is named after Louis Brandeis, the first Jewish Justice of the U.S Supreme Court.

Jewish community leader

He founded the National Jewish Coalition for Literacy and was co-founder and for 12 years editor of Moment Magazine . [2] He was characterized by Daniel Sokatch of the New Israel Fund as "the father of our Jewish social justice movement." [3]

New Israel Fund American organization

The New Israel Fund (NIF) is a U.S.-based non-profit organization established in 1979. It describes its objective as social justice and equality for all Israelis. The New Israel Fund says it has provided $300 million to over 900 Israeli civil society organizations that it describes as "cutting-edge." It describes itself as active on the issues of civil and human rights, women's rights, religious status, human rights in the occupied territories, the rights of Israel's Arab minority, and freedom of speech. The New Israel Fund is the largest foreign donor to progressive causes in Israel.

Fein is the founder of MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger, a Jewish hunger-relief organization started in 1985. [4]

MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger (MAZON) is an American nonprofit working to end hunger among people of all faiths and backgrounds in the United States and Israel.

Fein helped establish Americans for Peace Now. [5]

Author

He was the author of four books and the editor of two, and he wrote extensively for newspapers, magazines, and journals. From 1990, he wrote a syndicated weekly opinion column for The Forward newspaper.

The Forward, formerly known as The Jewish Daily Forward,is an American news media organization for a Jewish-American audience. Founded in 1897 as a Yiddish-language daily socialist newspaper, it launched an English-language weekly newspaper in 1990. In the 21st century The Forward is a digital publication with online reporting. In 2016, the publication of the Yiddish version changed its print format from a bi-weekly newspaper to a monthly magazine; the English weekly newspaper followed that way in 2017. Those magazines were published until 2019.

Fein's books include Where Are We? The Inner Life of America’s Jews and Israel: Politics and People. He was a contributor to The New York Times , The New Republic , Commentary , Commonweal , The Nation , Dissent , and the Los Angeles Times .

Family

His father was a professor of Jewish history.

He was the brother of Rashi Fein, Litt. D., Ph.D., a famed health economist termed "a father of Medicare" [6] and Professor of Economics of Medicine, Emeritus, in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. [7]

He was married twice and had three daughters.

Death

Fein died at the age of 80. [8]

Awards

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References

  1. Kinsman, C. D.; Nasso, C. (1975). Contemporary authors: a bio-bibliographical guide to current authors and their works. Gale Research Co. ISBN   9780810300279 . Retrieved September 8, 2015.
  2. "Latest news briefs from the Jewish Telegraphic Agency", Cleveland Jewish News, July 27, 2004. Accessed July 29, 2011.(subscription required)
  3. Daniel Sokatch, "Leonard 'Leibel' Fein" 2014-08-15, New Israel Fund. Accessed 2014-08-15.
  4. Dana Evan Kaplan, Contemporary American Judaism: transformation and renewal , New York: Columbia University Press, 2009; ISBN   978-0-231-13728-7; pp. 82–83
  5. Bryan Marquard (September 15, 2014). "Leonard Fein, at 80; illuminated roles of America's Jews". The Boston Globe.
  6. "Rashi Fein, a 'father of Medicare,' dies". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. September 9, 2014. Retrieved September 8, 2015.
  7. "A brother's tribute to Leonard Fein". MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. October 26, 2010. Archived from the original on 2014-09-11. Retrieved September 8, 2015.
  8. "Leonard Fein, Progressive Activist and Longtime Forward Columnist, Dies". The Forward . 2014-08-14. Retrieved September 8, 2015.
  9. Leonard Fein. "Speech to Hebrew Union College upon receiving an Honorary Doctorate in 1991". Berman Jewish Policy Archive, Stanford.