Leonard Isitt (minister)

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Works about Isitt

Footnotes

  1. Registered as Frances on birth, death and marriage certificates but shown as Francis on the family's gravestone at Linwood Cemetery
  2. This is a collection of newspaper clippings
  3. Isitt was a contributor to this book; the Gothic was a ship
  4. This is a prohibition tract
  5. These lectures were on the recently ended war and on the church's relations with both labour and pacifism
  6. A discourse delivered in St. Patrick's Cathedral, Auckland, on 14 August 1927, a few hours after Dr. Cleary's return from Europe; Cleary was the then-Roman Catholic bishop of Auckland

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Obituary in The Times , Mr L. M. Isitt, 15 September 1937, p.17
  2. The Eagle, vol. XVI no.1 (March, 1926), p. 55.
  3. Davidson, Allan K. "Isitt, Leonard Monk". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 14 May 2012.
  4. Bassett 1982, p. 66.
  5. Wilson 1985, p. 155.
  6. Bassett 1982, p. 35.
  7. "Official jubilee medals". The Evening Post . 6 May 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 16 August 2013.
  8. "Marriage". Taranaki Herald . Vol. XXIX, no. 3736. 18 May 1881. p. 2. Retrieved 22 March 2022.
  9. Crooks, David M. "Isitt, Leonard Monk". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 22 March 2022.
  10. "Personal notes : Private Willard Isitt". Lyttelton Times . Vol. CXVII, no. 17326. 15 November 1916. p. 8. Retrieved 22 March 2022.
  11. Pugsley, Chris. "Thornton, Leonard Whitmore". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 22 March 2022.
  12. "Christchurch City Council Cemeteries Database". Christchurch City Libraries. Retrieved 3 May 2011.
  13. "Deaths". The Press . Vol. LXXIV, no. 22519. 29 September 1938. p. 1. Retrieved 22 March 2022.

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References

The Reverend
Leonard Isitt
Leonard Monk Isitt, 1911.jpg
Isitt in 1911
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Christchurch North
In office
19111925
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Christchurch North
1911–1925
Succeeded by