Leonora Speyer

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Leonora Speyer

Lady Speyer by John Singer Sargent.jpg

Lady Speyer by John Singer Sargent, 1907
Born(1872-11-07)7 November 1872 [1]
Washington, D.C.
Died 10 February 1956(1956-02-10) (aged 83) [2]
New York
Nationality American/British
Occupation

Violinist

Poet
Spouse(s)Louis Meredith Howland(m. 1894–1902)
Sir Edgar Speyer (m. 1902;d. 1932)
Children 4

Leonora Speyer, Lady Speyer (née von Stosch) (7 November 1872 – 10 February 1956) was an American poet and violinist.

Contents

Life

Leonora Speyer and her husband Sir Edgar Speyer, circa 1921 Sir Edgar & Lady Leonora Speyer circa 1921.jpg
Leonora Speyer and her husband Sir Edgar Speyer, circa 1921

She was born in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Count Ferdinand von Stosch of Mantze in Silesia, who fought for the Union, and Julia Schayer, who was a writer.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, first President of the United States and Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Julia Thompson von Stosch Schayer was an American writer, best known for her short stories published in the 1870s-1890s.

She studied music in Brussels, Paris, and Leipzig, and played the violin professionally under the batons of Arthur Nikisch and Anton Seidl, among others. She first married Louis Meredith Howland in 1894, [3] but they divorced in Paris in 1902. [4] She then married banker Edgar Speyer (later Sir Edgar), of London, where the couple lived until 1915. [5]

Brussels Capital region of Belgium

Brussels, officially the Brussels-Capital Region, is a region of Belgium comprising 19 municipalities, including the City of Brussels, which is the capital of Belgium. The Brussels-Capital Region is located in the central portion of the country and is a part of both the French Community of Belgium and the Flemish Community, but is separate from the Flemish Region and the Walloon Region. Brussels is the most densely populated and the richest region in Belgium in terms of GDP per capita. It covers 161 km2 (62 sq mi), a relatively small area compared to the two other regions, and has a population of 1.2 million. The metropolitan area of Brussels counts over 2.1 million people, which makes it the largest in Belgium. It is also part of a large conurbation extending towards Ghent, Antwerp, Leuven and Walloon Brabant, home to over 5 million people.

Paris Capital of France

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of 105 square kilometres and an official estimated population of 2,140,526 residents as of 1 January 2019. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts.

Leipzig Place in Saxony, Germany

Leipzig is the most populous city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. With a population of 581,980 inhabitants as of 2017, it is Germany's tenth most populous city. Leipzig is located about 160 kilometres (99 mi) southwest of Berlin at the confluence of the White Elster, Pleiße and Parthe rivers at the southern end of the North German Plain.

Sir Edgar had German ancestry and following anti-German attacks on him that year, [5] they moved to the United States and took up residence in New York, where Speyer began writing poetry. She won the 1927 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for her book of poetry Fiddler's Farewell. [6]

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

The following are the Pulitzer Prizes for 1927.

Pulitzer Prize for Poetry American award for distinguished poetry

The Pulitzer Prize for Poetry is one of the seven American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Letters, Drama, and Music. It has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author, published during the preceding calendar year.

She had four daughters: Enid Howland with her first husband and Pamela, Leonora, and Vivien Claire Speyer with her second husband. [4] [5]

Awards

Selected works

Wayback Machine Web archive service

The Wayback Machine is a digital archive of the World Wide Web and other information on the Internet. It was launched in 2001 by the Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, California, United States.

Translation

Notes

  1. Ryan, Laura T. (2007). "Writers born on this day". syracuse.com. Retrieved 2008-09-25.
  2. "Leonora Speyer, Pulitzer Poet". The New York Times . February 11, 1956. p. 16. Retrieved 2008-11-29.
  3. "Art Inventories Catalog". Smithsonian American Art Museum. Retrieved 2008-11-30.
  4. 1 2 "Miss Enid Howland to Wed J.R. Hewitt". The New York Times . August 13, 1919. p. 11. Retrieved 2008-11-29.
  5. 1 2 3 Barker, Theo (2004). "Speyer, Sir Edgar, baronet (1862–1932)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography . Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/36215 . Retrieved 2008-09-05.
  6. Poetry X » Poetry Archives » Leonora Speyer » "Biography"

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