Lhotse Middle

Last updated
Lhotse Middle
Highest point
Elevation 8,410 m (27,590 ft)
Prominence 60 m (200 ft)
Isolation 0.43 km (0.27 mi)
Parent peak Lhotse
Coordinates 27°57′39.21″N86°56′20.08″E / 27.9608917°N 86.9389111°E / 27.9608917; 86.9389111 Coordinates: 27°57′39.21″N86°56′20.08″E / 27.9608917°N 86.9389111°E / 27.9608917; 86.9389111
Geography
Location Lhotse, Khumbu, Nepal
Lhotse, Tibetan Autonomous Region, China
Parent range Himalayas
Climbing
First ascent May 23, 2001
Easiest route Snow/rock climb

Lhotse Middle is a subsidiary peak to Lhotse, and was the final eight-thousander to be summited. It is a sharp, jagged peak rising 8,410 metres (27,590 ft) high, and has been described as the most difficult peak over eight thousand meters to climb.[ citation needed ]

Lhotse mountain in Nepal

Lhotse is the fourth highest mountain in the world at 8,516 metres (27,940 ft), after Mount Everest, K2, and Kangchenjunga. Part of the Everest massif, Lhotse is connected to the latter peak via the South Col. Lhotse means “South Peak” in Tibetan. In addition to the main summit at 8,516 metres (27,940 ft) above sea level, the mountain comprises the smaller peaks Lhotse Middle (East) at 8,414 m (27,605 ft), and Lhotse Shar at 8,383 m (27,503 ft). The summit is on the border between Tibet of China and the Khumbu region of Nepal.

Eight-thousander 14 peaks over 8,000 m (26,247 ft)

The International Mountaineering and Climbing Federation or UIAA recognise eight-thousanders as the 14 mountains that are more than 8,000 metres (26,247 ft) in height above sea level, and are considered to be sufficiently independent from neighbouring peaks. However, there is no precise definition of the criteria used to assess independence and since 2012, the UIAA has been involved in a process to consider whether the list should be expanded to 20 mountains. All eight-thousanders are located in the Himalayan and Karakoram mountain ranges in Asia, and their summits are in the death zone.

First ascent

Lhotse Middle was first climbed in 2001 by three groups of Russian climbers. [1] At the time, it was the last unclimbed named eight-thousand-metre summit. [2] Several members of the 2001 expedition had attempted to reach the summit in 1997, but bad weather forced them to abandon the attempt, and one climber was killed during the descent. [3]

Russia transcontinental country in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia

Russia, officially the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country in Eastern Europe and North Asia. At 17,125,200 square kilometres (6,612,100 sq mi), Russia is by a considerable margin the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with about 146.77 million people as of 2019, including Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital, Moscow, is one of the largest cities in the world and the second largest city in Europe; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. However, Russia recognises two more countries that border it, Abkhazia and South Ossetia, both of which are internationally recognized as parts of Georgia.

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References

  1. Koshelenko, Yuri (2002). "Unraveling the Mystery of Lhotse Middle". American Alpine Journal. American Alpine Club. 44 (76): 166. Retrieved 10 April 2016.
  2. "First ascent on Lhotse Middle". K2 News. Retrieved 2009-12-20.
  3. "First ascent of Lhotse Middle (with route map)". russianclimb.com. Retrieved 2009-12-20.