Li Jinzhong

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The Khitan rebellion led by Li Jinzhong Khitan Rebellion.png
The Khitan rebellion led by Li Jinzhong

Li Jinzhong (李盡忠) (died September 23, 696 [1] ), titled Mushang Khan (無上可汗, literally "the khan that had no superior"), was a khan of the Khitan who, along with his brother-in-law Sun Wanrong, rose against Chinese hegemony in 696 and further invaded Chinese territory then under the rule of Wu Zetian's Zhou Dynasty. He died late in 696 and was succeeded by Sun.

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