Liam Clifford

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William Peter "Liam" Clifford (27 June 1876 – 24 February 1949) was the ninth president of the Gaelic Athletic Association (1926–1928).

Involved in the dairy co-operative movement in Limerick and neighbouring Clare for many years, Clifford became the Department of Agriculture’s chief dairy inspector in 1936. [1]

Clifford was chairman of the Limerick county board for 20 years, and also had a term as chairman of the Munster board.

Under Liam Clifford's leadership, the Tipperary team toured America, [2] and the GAA decided to allocate ten percent of gate receipts for ground development, which led to the provision of grounds throughout the country, [3] for which Clifford has been called “the great apostle of grounds development”. [4]

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References

  1. "GAA Presidents". gaa.ie. Archived from the original on May 3, 2012.
  2. http://www.askaboutireland.ie/aai-files/assets/libraries/limerick-city-library/reading-room/sport/william-p-clifford.pdf [ bare URL ]
  3. "Fedamore". visitballyhoura.com.
  4. Sweeney, Eamonn (2004-08-13). O'Brien Pocket History of Gaelic Sport. The O’Brien Press. ISBN   9780862788544 . Retrieved 2014-09-02.

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Sporting positions
Preceded by
Patrick Breen
President of the Gaelic Athletic Association
1926–1928
Succeeded by
Seán Ryan