Liane Collot d'Herbois

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Liane Collot d’Herbois (17 December 1907 in Camelford, England – 17 September 1999 in Driebergen, the Netherlands) was a British painter and anthroposophical painting therapist. She researched light, darkness, colour and its application in painting and in therapy. [1]

Camelford town and civil parish in north Cornwall, England

Camelford is a town and civil parish in north Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, situated in the River Camel valley northwest of Bodmin Moor. The town is approximately ten miles (16 km) north of Bodmin and is governed by Camelford Town Council. Lanteglos-by-Camelford is the ecclesiastical parish in which the town is situated. The ward population at the 2011 Census was 4,001. The Town population at the same census was 865 only

Driebergen Place in Utrecht, Netherlands

Driebergen is a former village and municipality in the Dutch province of Utrecht. It is first mentioned as Thriberghen in 1159. The former municipality of Driebergen existed until 1931, when it merged with Rijsenburg, to create the new municipality of Driebergen-Rijsenburg. In later years, due to growth of the villages of Driebergen and Rijsenburg, the villages themselves also merged, to become the single town of Driebergen-Rijsenburg. Since 2006, Driebergen-Rijsenburg is part of the new municipality Utrechtse Heuvelrug.

Contents

Biography

Liane grew up near Tintagel as the only child of a Spanish-French father and Scottish mother until she was twelve years old, experiencing inwardly the power of her natural surroundings. At the outbreak of the first world war the family moved to Australia, her mother and she herself, however, returning to England after a short time. Liane had a pronounced gift for drawing and was already selling pictures at the age of eleven. Her encounter with Buddhism and somewhat later, the writings of Plato brought a certain calm to her fiery temperament.

Tintagel village in Cornwall

Tintagel or Trevena is a civil parish and village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The population of the parish was 1,820 people, and the area of the parish is 4,281 acres (17.32 km2). The parish population decreased to 1,727 at the 2011 census. An electoral ward also exists extending inland to Otterham. The population of this ward at the same census was 3,990. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with the legends surrounding King Arthur. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers and tourists, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain. Treknow is the largest of the other settlements in the parish, which include Trethevy, Trebarwith, Tregatta, Trenale and Trewarmett.

Buddhism World religion, founded by the Buddha

Buddhism is the world's fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists. Buddhism encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism originated in ancient India as a Sramana tradition sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, spreading through much of Asia. Two major extant branches of Buddhism are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada and Mahayana.

Plato Classical Greek philosopher

Plato was an Athenian philosopher during the Classical period in Ancient Greece, founder of the Platonist school of thought, and the Academy, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. He is widely considered the pivotal figure in the history of Ancient Greek and Western philosophy, along with his teacher, Socrates, and his most famous student, Aristotle. Plato has also often been cited as one of the founders of Western religion and spirituality. The so-called Neoplatonism of philosophers like Plotinus and Porphyry influenced Saint Augustine and thus Christianity. Alfred North Whitehead once noted: "the safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato."

She attended the Birmingham Academy of Arts painting school and discovered the book “Knowledge of the Higher Worlds” by Rudolf Steiner in the library there. At the early age of 20 she received her art teaching diploma, and at the same time a bursary for the British Museum in London.

Rudolf Steiner Austrian esotericist

Rudolf Joseph Lorenz Steiner was an Austrian philosopher, social reformer, architect, and esotericist. Steiner gained initial recognition at the end of the nineteenth century as a literary critic and published philosophical works including The Philosophy of Freedom. At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism.

British Museum National museum in the Bloomsbury area of London

The British Museum, in the Bloomsbury area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture. Its permanent collection of some eight million works is among the largest and most comprehensive in existence, having been widely sourced during the era of the British Empire. It documents the story of human culture from its beginnings to the present. It was the first public national museum in the world.

Her main desire was to work with difficult and handicapped children, whose drawings and paintings she felt able to interpret. After giving a presentation on Buddhism at the university, a priest of the Christian Community made her aware of the anthroposophical work. She thereupon went to Stourbridge in 1927, to the Sunfield Homes in Clent, joining their circle of co-workers for the next seven years.

Stourbridge town in the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley, in the West Midlands of England

Stourbridge is a market town in the West Midlands county of England. Situated on the River Stour, it was the centre of British glass making during the Industrial Revolution. The 2011 UK census recorded the town's population as 63,298. Conservative MP Margot James has held the Stourbridge parliamentary constituency since 2010.

Sunfield is an Independent special school, Children’s Home and charity on the border of Worcestershire and the West Midlands in England. It was founded in 1930 and now supports boys and girls, aged 6 – 19 years, with complex learning needs, including autism.

Clent village and civil parish in the Bromsgrove District of Worcestershire, England

Clent is a village and civil parish in the Bromsgrove District of Worcestershire, England, southwest of Birmingham and close to the edge of the West Midlands conurbation. At the 2001 census it had a population of 2,600.

There her paintings drew the attention of Dr Ita Wegman, the medical co-worker of Rudolf Steiner, who wrote encouraging her to continue with her painting and inviting her to visit Arlesheim. Here she was requested to try and paint healing pictures in the sense of a therapeutic art. Ita Wegman led her to understand that the most important thing for an artist is not to express him or herself but to create works for other people. After this she only seldom signed her works, schooling herself instead to observe things deeply, painting them “by heart”, as she said, the following day. For some time she stayed at the Casa Andrea Cristoforo in Ascona, followed Ita Wegman to Paris and returned once again to Arlesheim in 1940. Working together with Ita Wegman, Hilma Walter and Margarethe Hauschka, she developed an original and independent painting therapy for patients with a variety of ailments. The frescos in the “La Motta” chapel in Brissago, where later the urn of Ita Wegman was placed, are by her.

Ita Wegman Dutch physician

Ita Wegman co-founded Anthroposophical Medicine with Rudolf Steiner. In 1921, she founded the first anthroposophical medical clinic in Arlesheim, known until 2014 as the Ita Wegman Clinic. She also developed a special form of massage therapy, called rhythmical massage, and other self-claimed therapeutic treatments.

Arlesheim Place in Basel-Landschaft, Switzerland

Arlesheim is a statistic town and a municipality in the district of Arlesheim in the canton of Basel-Country in Switzerland. Its cathedral chapter seat, bishop's residence and cathedral are listed as a heritage site of national significance.

Ascona Place in Ticino, Switzerland

Ascona is a municipality in the district of Locarno in the canton of Ticino in Switzerland.

Work

After 1946 she journeyed with the painter and sculptress, Francine van Davelaar through Europe and North America, working artistically and instructing others. Finally both women settled in the Netherlands where they were joined by a group of painting students calling themselves the “Magenta Group” throughout the years 1967-1987.

Collot developed a form of veil painting consisting of up to 80 different layers of colour, based on Rudolf Steiner’s “Philosophy of Freedom”, which she outlined in her textbooks “Colour I” and “Colour II”. After being requested by the medical doctor Dr Paulo Walburgh-Schmidt in 1978 to instruct therapists in painting, she once more began to work directly with patients and to build up her therapeutic work. Here she achieved a widespread recognition amongst doctors, therapists and patients, with her sympathetic looks, her humour and energy and her fluency in the English, German, French and Dutch languages.

Exhibitions of her work took place in Colmar in 1975, regularly at the Goetheanum in Dornach, Switzerland and after her death at the Husemann Clinic in Buchenbach, Germany. Her many paintings, including altarpieces for the Christian Community, meditative pictures in clinics, homes and for private owners, are distributed throughout the world.

Colmar Prefecture and commune in Grand Est, France

Colmar is the third-largest commune of the Alsace region in north-eastern France. It is the seat of the prefecture of the Haut-Rhin department and the arrondissement of Colmar-Ribeauvillé.

Goetheanum world center for the anthroposophical movement, including performance halls, in Dornach, Switzerland

The Goetheanum, located in Dornach, in the canton of Solothurn, Switzerland, is the world center for the anthroposophical movement. The building was designed by Rudolf Steiner and named after Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. It includes two performance halls, gallery and lecture spaces, a library, a bookstore, and administrative spaces for the Anthroposophical Society; neighboring buildings house the society's research and educational facilities. Conferences focusing on themes of general interest or directed toward teachers, farmers, doctors, therapists, and other professionals are held at the center throughout the year.

Dornach Place in Solothurn, Switzerland

Dornach is a municipality in the district of Dorneck in the canton of Solothurn in Switzerland.

Published work

Further reading

Related Research Articles

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