Liberty Park

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Coordinates: 40°42′40″N74°00′51″W / 40.711067°N 74.014278°W / 40.711067; -74.014278

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Contents

Liberty Park
Liberty Street park NW opening day jeh.jpg
Opening day at Liberty Park
Location map United States Manhattan.png
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Liberty Park
USA New York City location map.svg
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Liberty Park
Location Lower Manhattan
Nearest city New York City
Area1 acre (4,000 m2)
CreatedJune 29, 2016 (2016-06-29)
Operated by Department of Parks and Recreation
OpenJune 29, 2016 (2016-06-29)
StatusOpen

Liberty Park is a one-acre (4,000 m2) elevated public park at the World Trade Center in New York City, overlooking the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. It is located above the Vehicular Security Center and opened on June 29, 2016. The St. Nicholas National Shrine is located within the park, as well as The Sphere , the iconic sculpture salvaged from the World Trade Center site. Another statue, America's Response Monument , is also located in the park.

Elevated park parks located above the normal ground (street) level

An elevated park refers to a park located above the normal ground (street) level. This type of a park has become more popular in the early 21st century, featuring in a number of urban renewal projects. While usually associated with repurposed transportation infrastructure, some elevated parks are designed on top of buildings.

World Trade Center (2001–present) set of buildings built on the site of the former Word Trade Center site in New York City after 2001

The World Trade Center is a mostly completed complex of buildings in Lower Manhattan, New York City, U.S., replacing the original seven buildings on the same site that were destroyed in the September 11 attacks. The site is being rebuilt with up to six new skyscrapers, four of which have been completed; a memorial and museum to those killed in the attacks; the elevated Liberty Park adjacent to the site; and a transportation hub. The 104-story One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, is the lead building for the new complex.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

History

Construction began in 2013 when the Vehicular Security Center was completed. [1] Liberty Park is located on top of the Vehicular Security Center, the latter of which protects the site against unauthorized vehicles. The parking facility is linked to the concourse area, which feeds the entire 16-acre World Trade Center site. [2] About $50 million was allocated to the park's construction by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in December 2013. [3] The park opened on June 29, 2016. [4] [5] On August 16, 2017, the Port Authority installed The Sphere within the park, overlooking its original location. [6]

Vehicular Security Center

The World Trade Center Vehicle Security Center and Tour Bus Parking Facility, or simply the Vehicular Security Center (VSC), is a secure complex for truck delivery and underground parking at the World Trade Center. The entrance to the VSC is located at street-level along the southern edge of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum on Liberty Street. The VSC is connected via underground tunnels that feed the entire 16-acre (65,000 m2) WTC complex, linking the security checkpoint at its entrance with the buildings and services at the complex requiring vehicular services. Underground garages provide parking for tenants, visitors, and tour buses.

A concourse is a place where pathways or roads meet, such as in a hotel, a convention center, a railway station, an airport terminal, a hall, or other space.

World Trade Center site Grounds of the World Trade Center in New York City

The World Trade Center site, formerly referred to as "Ground Zero" or "the Pile" immediately after the September 11 attacks, is a 14.6-acre (5.9 ha) area in Lower Manhattan in New York City. The site is bounded by Vesey Street to the north, the West Side Highway to the west, Liberty Street to the south, and Church Street to the east. The Port Authority owns the site's land. The previous World Trade Center complex stood on the site until it was destroyed in the September 11 attacks.

Description

The sapling from the Anne Frank tree Liberty Park Sep 2018 25.jpg
The sapling from the Anne Frank tree

The park has a capacity of 750 people and is the roof of the Vehicular Security Center. A "living wall", measuring 336 feet (102 m) long and 20 feet (6.1 m) tall, is located on the park's northern facade adjoining Liberty Street. [7] It contains 826 panels, upon which are attached "periwinkle, Japanese spurge, winter creeper, sedge and Baltic ivy", [8] A walkway from the pedestrian bridge curves along the park. Egresses include three stairways, the pedestrian bridge, and a straight ramp down to Greenwich Street. One of these stairs, a wide staircase is located on the east side of the park, between Greenwich Street to the east and the back of the church to the west. There are wood benches and a small amphitheater-like elevated space at the western end of the park, facing West Street. Finally, there is a "continuous overlook" along much of Liberty Street in addition to "a gently curving balcony" at the church's foot. [8] A sapling from the Anne Frank tree is located alongside the ramp at the southeastern corner of Liberty Park. [7]

Facade Exterior side of a building, usually the front but not always

A facade is generally one exterior side of a building, usually the front. It is a foreign loan word from the French façade, which means "frontage" or "face".

Greenwich Street Street in Manhattan, New York

Greenwich Street is a north-south street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It extends from the intersection of Ninth Avenue and Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District at its northernmost end to its southern end at Battery Park.

Anne Frank tree horse-chestnut tree in the city center of Amsterdam that was featured in Anne Franks The Diary of a Young Girl

The Anne Frank tree was a horse-chestnut tree in the city center of Amsterdam that was featured in Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl. Anne Frank described the tree from The Annexe, the building where she and her family were hiding from the Nazis during World War II.

5 World Trade Center was originally planned to be built adjacent to the southern edge of the Vehicular Security Center and Liberty Park on the site of the former Deutsche Bank Building. [9] As of 2014, the Port Authority does not plan to proceed with construction of a mixed-use skyscraper on the site until the rest of the complex is complete, which will be no earlier than 2021. [10]

5 World Trade Center skyscraper

5 World Trade Center is a planned skyscraper at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The site is across Liberty Street, to the south of the main 16-acre (6.5 ha) World Trade Center site. As of June 2018, the project is on standby while the Port Authority explores a potential sale of the lot to a developer and looks for tenants to occupy the skyscraper. The proposed building shares its name with the original 5 World Trade Center, which was heavily damaged as a result of the collapse of the North Tower during the September 11 attacks and was later demolished. The Port Authority has no plans to construct a building at 130 Liberty Street, although it is open to future development of the site as office, retail, hotel, residential or some mix of those uses.

Deutsche Bank Building former skyscraper in New York City

The Deutsche Bank Building was a 39-story office skyscraper located at 130 Liberty Street in New York City, adjacent to the World Trade Center site. The building opened in 1974 and closed following the September 11 attacks, due to contamination that spread from the collapse of the South Tower. The structure existed from 1974 to 2007, and was designed by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, which also designed the famous Empire State Building.

The park overlooks the National September 11 Memorial & Museum and has a connection to the Liberty Street Bridge. [11] The St. Nicholas Church, destroyed in the September 11 attacks, is being rebuilt in the park, with a new design by Santiago Calatrava, who also designed the Transportation Hub. [8] The park, located 25 feet (7.6 m) above Liberty Street, is just a little more than one acre (4,000 m2) in area. [12]

National September 11 Memorial & Museum Memorial and museum in New York City commemorating the September 11, 2001 attacks

The National September 11 Memorial & Museum is a memorial and museum in New York City commemorating the September 11, 2001 attacks, which killed 2,977 people, and the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, which killed six. The memorial is located at the World Trade Center site, the former location of the Twin Towers that were destroyed during the September 11 attacks. It is operated by a non-profit institution whose mission is to raise funds for, program, and operate the memorial and museum at the World Trade Center site.

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church Church in New York, United States

The St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church is a church under construction as part of the World Trade Center in Manhattan, New York City. The church is being developed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and was designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. Originally scheduled to be completed in 2017, the church's construction was later stalled.

September 11 attacks Attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001

The September 11 attacks were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda against the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks killed 2,996 people, injured over 6,000 others, and caused at least $10 billion in infrastructure and property damage. Additional people died of 9/11-related cancer and respiratory diseases in the months and years following the attacks.

Location of The Sphere

The Sphere, November 2017 The Sphere in Liberty Park 2 vc.jpg
The Sphere , November 2017

The Sphere , a large cast bronze sculpture by German artist Fritz Koenig, had stood in Austin J. Tobin Plaza between the World Trade Center towers in Manhattan. Recovered from the rubble after the September 11 attacks in 2001, intact but visibly damaged, The Sphere faced an uncertain future and was dismantled and stored. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ), which owns The Sphere, considered placing the sculpture in Liberty Park, which will be located between the 90 West Street building and the World Trade Center Memorial site. Construction on Liberty Park did not start until 2013, so a location was needed to place The Sphere until Liberty Park was completed. As of February 2011, PANYNJ had not made an official final decision on where to place the sculpture once Battery Park construction commences, forcing the sculpture to move. Until Liberty Park opened, The Sphere was to go into storage. [13] [14]

When Liberty Park opened in June 2016, the question had not been resolved. [15] On July 22, 2016, the Port Authority voted to move the sculpture to Liberty Park, [16] [17] and in August 2017, PANYNJ relocated the sculpture to Liberty Park. [18] On September 6, 2017, the Sphere was unveiled in its permanent home in Liberty Park, overlooking the World Trade Center site. [19] [20]

Horse Soldier sculpture

America's Response Monument America's Response Monument-De Oppresso Liber.jpg
America's Response Monument

The America's Response Monument, a life-and-a-half scale bronze statue commemorating the actions of U.S. Special Operations Forces in the first few weeks of the War in Afghanistan, was unveiled to the public during the Veteran's Day Parade in New York City on November 11, 2011. The statue was dedicated in a ceremony led by Vice President Joe Biden and Lieutenant-General John Mulholland, commander of U.S. Army Special Operations Command and formerly commander of Task Force Dagger during the initial days of the War in Afghanistan. [21] [22] Soldiers representing the United States Army Special Operations Command attended the dedication ceremony. [23]

The inscription at base of the sculpture bears its name, America's Response Monument, and the Latin subtitle De Oppresso Liber . The subtitle, traditionally translated as "to free the oppressed", is the motto of the Green Berets, who inspired the monument. [24] A piece of steel from the original World Trade Center is embedded in the base. [25] It is the first public monument to honor United States special forces. [26] [27]

The $750,000 cost of statue was donated by hundreds of private citizens, including some survivors of the September 11 attacks. [28] [29] The statue was temporarily located in the West Street Lobby inside One World Financial Center in New York City opposite Ground Zero. [21] [22] On September 13, 2016, the statue was rededicated once again on an elevated space on the south side of Ground Zero within Liberty Park. [30] [31]

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church

The St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church seen in September 2018 Liberty Park Sep 2018 20.jpg
The St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church seen in September 2018

On July 23, 2008, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey reached a deal with the leaders of the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church for the Port Authority to acquire the 1,200-square-foot (110 m2) lot that the church had occupied, for $20 million, $10 million of which is coming from the Port Authority and the other $10 million of which is coming from JPMorgan Chase. [32] [33]

In addition, the Port Authority was willing to pay up to $40 million to construct a bomb-proof platform underneath. [34] In March 2009, the Port Authority stated it quit talking with the church and canceled building St. Nicholas altogether. The Port Authority claimed that the church was asking for too much, and that they might delay the whole World Trade Center project. [33] The Archdioceses says that they just wanted the church back, and a third of the building would be a memorial for 9/11, and a place where people of all faiths could pray and remember those who died in the attacks.

Architect Santiago Calatrava was awarded the task of designing the new St. Nicholas. His plans drew inspiration from the great Byzantine churches of Hagia Sophia and the Church of the Holy Savior in Chora, both in Istanbul. [35] The church will be constructed in Liberty Park; the site for the new church is east of the original site at 155 Cedar Street. [36] As of 2013, construction of the new church was scheduled to begin in early 2014, and to end in late 2017. [37] The new church will be created from steel and concrete but the exterior will be clad in stone. The interior design of the church is still being determined. [38] Construction of the new church began in early 2014. [39]

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WTC Cortlandt station New York City Subway station in Manhattan

WTC Cortlandt, additionally signed as World Trade Center on walls and formerly known as Cortlandt Street and Cortlandt Street–World Trade Center, is a station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway in Lower Manhattan. The station is located under the intersection of Greenwich Street and Cortlandt Way within the World Trade Center. It is served by the 1 train at all times.

<i>The Sphere</i> Fritz Koenig sculpture damaged in September 11, 2001, terror attacks

The Sphere is a 25-foot (7.6 m) high, cast bronze sculpture by German artist Fritz Koenig. It is located in Liberty Park at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, New York City. Originally located at the Austin J. Tobin Plaza, the centerpiece survived the collapse of the World Trade Center towers, which resulted from the September 11 attacks in 2001.

World Trade Center station (PATH) Port Authority Trans-Hudson rail station

World Trade Center is a terminal station on the PATH system. It is located in the World Trade Center complex, within the Financial District neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. It is served by the Newark–World Trade Center line on weekdays and holiday weekends, as well as by the Hoboken–World Trade Center line on weekdays, and is the eastern terminus of both.

World Trade Center cross

The World Trade Center cross, also known as the Ground Zero cross, is a formation of steel beams found among the debris of the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan, New York City, following the September 11 attacks in 2001. This set of beams is so named because it resembles the proportions of a Christian cross. The beams have been part of an exhibit at the National September 11 Museum since 2014.

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4 World Trade Center Skyscraper in Manhattan, New York City

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References

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