Lieutenant colonel

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Lieutenant colonel ( UK: /lɛfˈtɛnəntˈkɜːrnəl/ or US: /lˈtɛnəntˈkɜːrnəl/ ) is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies, most marine forces and some air forces of the world, above a major and below a colonel. Several police forces in the United States use the rank of lieutenant colonel. The rank of lieutenant colonel is often shortened to simply "colonel" in conversation and in unofficial correspondence. Sometimes, the term 'half-colonel' is used in casual conversation in the British Army. [1] A lieutenant colonel is typically in charge of a battalion or regiment in the army.

Contents

Lieutenant colonel ranks by country

The following articles deal with the rank of lieutenant colonel (or its equivalent)

Lieutenant colonel equivalents

See also

Notes

  1. All Indonesian military services share the same rank name and insignia – i.e. two gold jasmine buds. A lieutenant colonel in the Army usually has a billet as battalion commander, regiment / brigade chief of staff, headquarters staff, department head, or commander of any unit that has the same level as battalion. In the Navy, the common billet is ship's commanding officer, squadron commander, shore department head or staff position. In the Air Force, it has the billet of squadron commander of battalion commander of Air Force Special Force's Corps. In the Marine Corps, usual billet is infantry battalion commander or infantry brigade's chief of staff, although it can command an artillery or cavalry regiment.

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Military rank Element of hierarchy in armed forces

Military ranks are a system of hierarchical relationships in armed forces, police, intelligence agencies or other institutions organized along military lines. The military rank system defines dominance, authority, and responsibility in a military hierarchy. It incorporates the principles of exercising power and authority into the military chain of command – the succession of commanders superior to subordinates through which command is exercised. The military chain of command constructs an important component for organized collective action.

A lieutenant is the second junior-most or in some cases the junior-most commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police, and other organizations of many nations.

Colonel is a senior military officer rank below the general officer ranks. However, in some small military forces, such as those of Monaco or the Vatican, colonel is the highest rank. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations.

Lieutenant general or lieutenant-general is a three-star military rank used in many countries. The rank traces its origins to the Middle Ages, where the title of lieutenant general was held by the second in command on the battlefield, who was normally subordinate to a captain general.

Brigadier general or brigade general is a senior rank in the armed forces. It is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting between the ranks of colonel and major general. When appointed to a field command, a brigadier general is typically in command of a brigade consisting of around 4,000 troops. In some countries a brigadier general is informally designated as a one-star general (OF-6).

Oberstleutnant is a rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces of German-speaking countries, including the German Bundeswehr, Austrian Bundesheer and the Swiss Army. It was in use in past militaries like the German Wehrmacht, German Imperial Army and Austro-Hungarian Army. It is equivalent to the Lieutenant colonel rank of English-speaking countries. It is below the Oberst and above the Major. The rank should not be confused with the lower-ranked but similar-sounding Oberleutnant, which is the equivalent of the First lieutenant.

First lieutenant is a commissioned officer military rank in many armed forces; in some forces, it is an appointment.

Commandant is a title often given to the officer in charge of a military training establishment or academy. This usage is common in English-speaking nations. In some countries it may be a military or police rank. It is also often used to refer to the commander of a military prison or prison camp.

Captain lieutenant or captain-lieutenant is a military rank, used in a number of navies worldwide and formerly in the British Army. It is generally equivalent to the Commonwealth or US naval rank of lieutenant, and has the NATO rank code of OF-2, though this can vary.

The following tables present the ranks of the Indian Army. These ranks generally correspond with those of Western militaries, and in particular reflect those of the British and Commonwealth armies. Traditional names for ranks are still used, as well as Western names.

Colonel (Canada) officer rank of the Canadian Armed Forces

In the Canadian Forces, the rank of colonel (Col) is a rank for officers who wear army or air force uniform, equal to a captain for officers who wear navy uniform. A colonel is the highest rank of senior officer. A colonel is senior to a lieutenant-colonel or naval commander, and junior to a brigadier-general or commodore.

Colonel (United States) Military rank of the United States

In the United States Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force, colonel is the most senior field grade military officer rank, immediately above the rank of lieutenant colonel and just below the rank of brigadier general. It is equivalent to the naval rank of captain in the other uniformed services. By law, a colonel must have at least 22 years of cumulative service and a minimum of three years as a lieutenant colonel before being promoted. The pay grade for colonel is O-6.

Colonel (Col) is a rank of the British Army and Royal Marines, ranking below brigadier, and above lieutenant colonel. British colonels are not usually field commanders; typically they serve as staff officers between field commands at battalion and brigade level. The insignia is two diamond-shaped pips below a crown. The crown has varied in the past with different monarchs; the current Queen's reign has used St Edward's Crown. The rank is equivalent to captain in the Royal Navy and group captain in the Royal Air Force.

Podpolkovnik is a military rank in Slavic countries which corresponds to the lieutenant colonel in the English-speaking states and military.

Major (United States) military rank of the United States

In the United States Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force, major is a field grade military officer rank above the rank of captain and below the rank of lieutenant colonel. It is equivalent to the naval rank of lieutenant commander in the other uniformed services. Although lieutenant commanders are considered junior officers by their respective services, the rank of major is that of a senior officer in the United States Army, the United States Marine Corps, and the United States Air Force.

Lieutenant colonel, is a rank in the British Army and Royal Marines which is also used in many Commonwealth countries. The rank is superior to major, and subordinate to colonel. The comparable Royal Navy rank is commander, and the comparable rank in the Royal Air Force and many Commonwealth air forces is wing commander.

Lieutenant colonel (United States) Officer rank of the United States military

In the United States Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force, lieutenant colonel is a field-grade military officer rank, just above the rank of major and just below the rank of colonel. It is equivalent to the naval rank of commander in the other uniformed services.

Överstelöjtnant is an officer's rank (OF4) in Finland and Sweden, senior to Major (Majuri) and junior to Överste (Eversti).

Överste is an officer rank in Finland and Sweden, immediately above överstelöjtnant (everstiluutnantti) and below brigadgeneral (prikaatikenraali). It literally means "the highest" and has originally been a rank for regiment commanders. In Finland, brigades are also commanded by holders of this rank. It is the highest rank below general officers.

Ranks of the Czechoslovak Armed Forces shows the military ranks and rank insignia in use by the First Czechoslovak Republic, the Second Czechoslovak Republic, the Third Czechoslovak Republic, and the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic.

References

  1. LTC Keith E. Bonn, Army Officer's Guide, 50th Edition, p. 14. Mechanicsville, Pa.: Stackpole Books, 2005.
  2. British Army website Archived 15 September 2008 at the Wayback Machine