Lieutenant colonel

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Lieutenant colonel ( UK: /lɛfˈtɛnəntˈkɜːrnəl/ lef-TEN-ənt KUR-nəl, US: /lˈtɛn-/ loo-TEN-) is a rank of commissioned officers in the armies, most marine forces and some air forces of the world, above a major and below a colonel. Several police forces in the United States use the rank of lieutenant colonel. The rank of lieutenant colonel is often shortened to simply "colonel" in conversation and in unofficial correspondence. Sometimes, the term 'half-colonel' is used in casual conversation in the British Army. [1] In the United States Air Force, the term 'light bird' or 'light bird colonel' (as opposed to a 'full bird colonel') is an acceptable casual reference to the rank but is never used directly towards the rank holder.[ citation needed ] A lieutenant colonel is typically in charge of a battalion or regiment in the army.

Contents

The following articles deal with the rank of lieutenant colonel:

Army

Air Force

Other services

See also

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References

  1. Bonn, Keith E. (2005). Army Officer's Guide (50th ed.). Mechanicsville, Pa.: Stackpole Books. p. 14.
  2. "Officers' rank insignia". British Army . Archived from the original on 15 September 2008.