Limerick County (Parliament of Ireland constituency)

Last updated

Limerick County
Former county constituency
for the Irish House of Commons
Former constituency
Created ()
Abolished1800
Seats2
Replaced by Limerick County

Limerick County was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800.

Contents

Members of Parliament

ElectionFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond partyNotes
1585 Sir Thomas Norris Richard Bourke
1613Sir Francis Berkeley of Askeaton Sir Thomas Browne Mills
1639Sir Edward Fitzharris, Kt (died 1641) Sir Hardress Waller
1654 Sir Hardress Waller Henry Ingoldsby Protectorate Parliaments Westminster
Also represented Kerry and Clare
1656
1659
1661 Sir William King Robert Oliver
1689Sir John Fitzgerald, BtGerald Fitzgerald
1692 George Evans Sir William King
1695 Sir Thomas Southwell, 2nd Bt
1703 Charles Oliver
1707 George Evans
1713 George King
1715 Sir Thomas Southwell, 2nd Bt Robert Oliver
1717 Hon. Thomas Southwell
1721 Eyre Evans
1727 Richard Southwell
1729 Hon. Henry Southwell
1759 Hugh Massy
1761 Hon. Thomas George Southwell
1767 Hon. Thomas Arthur Southwell
1768 Silver Oliver
1776 Sir Henry Hartstonge, 3rd Bt
1783 Hon. Hugh Massy
1788 Richard Philip Oliver
1790 John Waller John Massy
1798 William Odell
1801Replaced by Westminster constituency of Limerick County

Notes

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    References