Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing

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Ling-Ling (left) and Hsing-Hsing, 1985 Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing 1985.jpg
Ling-Ling (left) and Hsing-Hsing, 1985

Ling-Ling (Chinese :玲玲, 1969–92) and Hsing-Hsing (simplified Chinese :兴兴; traditional Chinese :興興, 1970–99) were two giant pandas given to the United States as gifts by the government of China following President Richard Nixon's visit in 1972. As a gift, the U.S. government sent China a pair of musk oxen.

The pandas had been captured in the wild in June and December 1971. They arrived at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., on April 16, 1972, and were formally received several days later, on April 20, at a ceremony attended by First Lady Pat Nixon. While at the zoo, they attracted millions of visitors each year.

During their time at the National Zoo, the pair had five cubs, but none of them survived past a few days.

Ling-Ling died suddenly from heart failure [1] on December 30, 1992, [2] at which time she was the longest-lived giant panda in captivity outside China. Hsing-Hsing would go on to pass her record when he was euthanized by zookeepers on November 28, 1999 at the age of 28 due to kidney failure. [3] Following Hsing-Hsing's death, the zoo received thousands of letters and cards from people across the country expressing sympathy.

The Panda House at the National Zoo remained empty for over a year until the arrival of Mei Xiang and Tian Tian from the Wolong Research and Conservation Center for the Giant Panda in December 2000.

See also

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Ling Ling, Ling-Ling, or Lingling may refer to:

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Ling Ling (giant panda)

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Tian Tian (female giant panda)

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Bei Bei Giant panda at the US National Zoo

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References

  1. Bennefield, Robin M. (April 16, 1972). "Ling Ling and Hsing Hsing : Meet the Pandas : Animal Planet". animal.discovery.com. Discovery Communications, LLC. Retrieved May 26, 2012.
  2. Cohn, D'Vera; Masters, Brooke A. (December 31, 1992). "Ling-Ling Dies Suddenly". The Washington Post. Retrieved April 12, 2010.
  3. "Hsing-Hsing the Giant Panda Dies at Age 28 / He and Ling-Ling were gifts from Mao after Nixon's visit". San Francisco Chronicle. November 29, 1999. Retrieved July 20, 2011.