List of Acts of the Parliament of Scotland to 1707

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This is a list of Acts of the Parliament of Scotland. It lists the Acts of Parliament of the old Parliament of Scotland, that was merged with the old Parliament of England to form the Parliament of Great Britain, by the Union with England Act 1707.

The numbers after the titles of the Acts are the chapter numbers. Acts are referenced using 'Year of reign', 'Monarch', c., 'Chapter number' — e.g. 16 Charles II c. 2 — to define a chapter of the appropriate statute book. Chapter numbers given in the duodecimo edition, where applicable, are given in square brackets.

This list is only a partial catalogue of Acts that remained on the statute books even after the Union of 1707. For a largely comprehensive edition of Scottish Acts of Parliament see Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, ed. Thomas Thomson. A new edition has been edited by the Scottish Parliament Project at the University of St Andrews and is available online as the Records of the Parliaments of Scotland.

For the period after 1707, see list of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain.

15th century

1424

Record ed: May 26

1429

1449

1469

1474

1487

1491

1496

16th century

1532

1535

1540

1555

1560

1563

1567

1578

1579

1581

1584

1585

1587

1592

1594

1597

17th century

1600

1606

1607

1617

1621

1633

1646

1661

1663

1669

1672

1681

1685

1686

1689

1690

1693

1695

1696

1698

18th century

1701

1702

1703

1704

1705

1707

See also

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References

  1. "Succession (Scotland) Act 2016". legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 3 June 2021.
  2. Wodrow, Robert (1832). The History of the Suffering of the Church of Scotland. 3. Blackie. pp. 295–297.
  3. "Parliamentary Register 28 June 1695" . Retrieved 30 May 2016.