List of Boston Red Sox no-hitters

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The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Boston, Massachusetts, also known in their early years as the "Boston Americans" (1901–07). [1] They play in the American League East division. Pitchers for the Red Sox have thrown 18 no-hitters in franchise history. [2]

Boston Red Sox Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Boston, Massachusetts, United States

The Boston Red Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. The Red Sox have won nine World Series championships, tied for the third-most of any MLB team, and they have played in 13. Their most recent appearance and win was in 2018. In addition, they won the 1904 American League pennant, but were not able to defend their 1903 World Series championship when the New York Giants refused to participate in the 1904 World Series. Founded in 1901 as one of the American League's eight charter franchises, the Red Sox' home ballpark has been Fenway Park since 1912. The "Red Sox" name was chosen by the team owner, John I. Taylor, circa 1908, following the lead of previous teams that had been known as the "Boston Red Stockings", including the forerunner of the Atlanta Braves.

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization and the oldest of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901, respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the major league clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

The American League East is one of Major League Baseball (MLB)'s six divisions. This division was created before the start of the 1969 season along with the American League West division. Before that time the American League (AL) had existed as a single league of 10 teams.

Contents

A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings. In a no-hit game, a batter may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference." [3] (No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. [4] ) A no-hitter is rare enough that one team in Major League Baseball, the San Diego Padres, has never had a pitcher accomplish the feat. [5] The New York Mets' first no-hitter (pitched by Johan Santana) came on June 1, 2012, in the team's 8,021st game and 51st season. [6]

San Diego Padres Baseball Team and Major League Baseball franchise in San Diego, California, United States

The San Diego Padres are an American professional baseball team based in San Diego, California. The Padres compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) West division. Founded in 1969, the Padres have won two NL pennants — in 1984 and 1998, losing in the World Series both years. As of 2018, they have had 14 winning seasons in franchise history. The Padres are one of two Major League Baseball teams in California to originate from that state; the Athletics were originally from Philadelphia, and the Dodgers and Giants are originally from two New York City boroughs – Brooklyn and Manhattan, respectively. The Padres are the only MLB team that does not share its city with another franchise in the four major American professional sports leagues. The Padres are the only major professional sports franchise to be located in San Diego, following the relocation of the Chargers to Los Angeles in 2017. They are also the only franchise in the MLB to not have a no-hitter, having gone 8020 games without throwing one, a major league record to begin a franchise.

New York Mets Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Queens, New York, United States

The New York Mets are a Major League Baseball team based in the New York City borough of Queens. The Mets compete in the National League East division. They are one of two Major League clubs based in New York City; the other is the New York Yankees of the American League East.

Johan Santana Venezuelan baseball player

Johan Alexander Santana Araque is a Venezuelan former professional baseball starting pitcher. Santana pitched in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Minnesota Twins from 2000 to 2007 and for the New York Mets from 2008 to 2012, sidelined by injury challenges since the 2012 season. A two-time Cy Young Award winner with the Twins, Santana is a four-time All-Star and earned a pitching triple crown in 2006. On June 1, 2012, Santana threw a no-hitter against the St. Louis Cardinals, which is to date the only no-hitter in New York Mets history.

One perfect game, a special subcategory of no-hitter, has been pitched in Red Sox history. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game." [3] Every opposing batter is retired. This feat was achieved by Cy Young in 1904. [7] Young's perfect game, pitched on May 5, 1904, also was the first no-hitter in Red Sox history; the most recent Red Sox no-hitter was thrown by Jon Lester on May 19, 2008. [7]

Perfect game Baseball game in which at least one team has no baserunners

A perfect game in Major League Baseball is a game in which a pitcher pitches a victory that lasts a minimum of nine innings and no opposing batter reaches base. To achieve a perfect game, a team must not allow an opposing player to reach base by any means, including hits, walks, hit batsmen, or fielding errors; in short, "27 up, 27 down". The feat has been achieved 23 times in MLB history – 21 times since the modern era began in 1900, most recently by Félix Hernández of the Seattle Mariners on August 15, 2012. A perfect game is also a no-hitter and a shutout. A fielding error that does not allow a batter to reach base, such as a misplayed foul ball, does not spoil a perfect game. Weather-shortened contests in which a team has no baserunners and games in which a team reaches first base only in extra innings do not qualify as perfect games under the present definition.

Cy Young American baseball player

Denton True "Cy" Young was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. Born in Gilmore, Ohio, he worked on his family's farm as a youth before starting his professional baseball career. Young entered the major leagues in 1890 with the National League's Cleveland Spiders and pitched for them until 1898. He was then transferred to the St. Louis Cardinals franchise. In 1901, Young jumped to the American League and played for the Boston Red Sox franchise until 1908, helping them win the 1903 World Series. He finished his career with the Cleveland Naps and Boston Rustlers, retiring in 1911.

Jon Lester American baseball player

Jonathan Tyler Lester is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played in MLB for the Boston Red Sox from 2006 to 2014 and the Oakland Athletics in 2014. Less than two years after being diagnosed with lymphoma, Lester started and won the final game of the 2007 World Series for the Red Sox, and in May 2008, pitched a no-hitter against the Kansas City Royals. He helped lead the Red Sox to another championship in 2013, and he won the 2016 World Series with the Cubs.

Two pitchers have thrown more than one no-hitter in a Red Sox uniform, Hall of Famer Cy Young and Dutch Leonard. Thirteen of the Red Sox no-hitters were thrown at home (the first four at the Huntington Avenue Grounds and the other nine at Fenway Park) and five on the road. Two were thrown in April, two in May, five in June, two in July, three in August, and four in September. The longest interval between Red Sox no-hitters was 35 years, 6 months, and 18 days, between the games pitched by Dave Morehead, on September 16, 1965 and Hideo Nomo, on April 4, 2001. The shortest interval between Red Sox no-hitters was merely 1 month and 6 days, between the games pitched by Earl Wilson on June 26, 1962 and Bill Monbouquette on August 1, 1962. [7]

Dutch Leonard (left-handed pitcher) American baseball player (1892-1952)

Hubert Benjamin "Dutch" Leonard, was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who had an 11-year career from 1913 to 1921, and 1924 to 1925. He played for the Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers, and holds the major league modern-era record for the lowest single-season ERA of all time — 0.96 in 1914. The all-time record holder is Tim Keefe with a 0.86 ERA in 1880. He is not to be confused with a pitcher of the same name that had pitched in the National League around a decade later.

Huntington Avenue Grounds architectural structure

Huntington Avenue American League Baseball Grounds is the full name of the baseball stadium that formerly stood in Boston, Massachusetts, and was the first home field for the Boston Red Sox from 1901–1911. The stadium, built for $35,000, was located on what is now Northeastern University, at the time across the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad tracks from the South End Grounds, home of the Boston Braves.

Fenway Park Baseball stadium in Boston, Massachusetts

Fenway Park is a baseball park located in Boston, Massachusetts near Kenmore Square. Since 1912, it has been the home for the Boston Red Sox, the city's American League baseball team, and since 1953, its only Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise. It is the oldest ballpark in MLB. Because of its age and constrained location in Boston's dense Fenway–Kenmore neighborhood, the park has been renovated or expanded many times, resulting in quirky features including "The Triangle," Pesky's Pole, and the Green Monster in left field. It is the fourth-smallest among MLB ballparks by seating capacity, second-smallest by total capacity, and one of eight that cannot accommodate at least 40,000 spectators.

The Red Sox have no-hit the Chicago White Sox and Baltimore Orioles (formerly the "St. Louis Browns") the most: four times each. The White Sox were no-hit by Jesse Tannehill in 1904, Bill Dinneen in 1905, Parnell in 1956, and Monbouquette in 1962. The Browns and Orioles were no-hit by Smokey Joe Wood in 1911, Leonard in 1916, Hideo Nomo in 2001, and Clay Buchholz in 2007. The Red Sox have won all of their no-hitters (three times in major league history a team has thrown a nine-inning no-hitter and lost the game). The most baserunners allowed in a Red Sox no-hitter was five, by Dutch Leonard in 1918. Of the 18 Red Sox no-hitters, four have been won by a score of 4–0 and another four by a score of 2–0, making those final scores more common than any other results. The largest margin of victory in a Red Sox no-hitter was 10–0, in wins by Derek Lowe in 2002 and Clay Buchholz in 2007. The smallest margin of victory was 1–0, Monbouquette's no-hitter in 1962.

Chicago White Sox Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Chicago, Illinois, United States

The Chicago White Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) Central division. The White Sox are owned by Jerry Reinsdorf, and play their home games at Guaranteed Rate Field, located on the city's South Side. They are one of two major league clubs in Chicago; the other is the Chicago Cubs, who are a member of the National League (NL) Central division.

Baltimore Orioles Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Baltimore, Maryland, United States

The Baltimore Orioles are an American professional baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland. As one of the American League's eight charter teams in 1901, this particular franchise spent its first year as a major league club in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the Milwaukee Brewers before moving to St. Louis, Missouri, to become the St. Louis Browns in 1902. After 52 years in St. Louis, the franchise was purchased in November 1953 by a syndicate of Baltimore business and civic interests led by attorney/civic activist Clarence Miles and Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. The team's current owner is American trial lawyer Peter Angelos.

Jesse Tannehill American baseball player

Jesse Niles Tannehill was a dead-ball era left-handed pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Highlanders, Boston Red Sox, and the Washington Senators. Tannehill was among the best pitchers of his era and was one of the best-hitting pitchers of all time. In fact, Tannehill was such a good hitter that he was used in the outfield 87 times in his career.

12 different managers have led the team during the franchise's 18 no-hitters. 15 different home plate umpires presided over the franchise's 18 no-hitters. Jason Varitek has caught the last 4 of the Red Sox's No-hitters, a Major League record for No-hitters caught by one catcher.

List of no-hitters in Red Sox history

  Indicates a perfect game
 £ Pitcher was left-handed
 * Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
#DatePitcherFinal scoreBase-
runners
OpponentCatcherPlate umpireManagerNotesRef
1May 5, 1904 Cy Young * (1)3–00 Philadelphia Athletics Lou Criger (1) Bob Caruthers Jimmy Collins (1)
  • First no-hitter in franchise history
  • First perfect game in Red Sox history and 3rd in MLB history (First in the MLB Modern Era)
  • First franchise's no-hitter at home
  • First right-handed pitcher to throw a no-hitter in franchise history
[8]
2August 17, 1904 Jesse Tannehill £6–01 Chicago White Sox Duke Farrell Frank Dwyer Jimmy Collins (2)
  • First left-handed pitcher to throw a no-hitter in franchise history
[8]
3September 27, 1905 Bill Dinneen 2–02 Chicago White Sox Lou Criger (2) Jack Sheridan Jimmy Collins (3)
  • First game of a doubleheader
  • Latest calendar date of franchise's no-hitter
  • Last no-hitter for Americans as a team name
[9]
4June 30, 1908 Cy Young * (2)8–01@ New York Highlanders Lou Criger (3) Silk O'Laughlin (1) Deacon McGuire
  • First Red Sox no-hitter on the road
  • First no-hitter since the franchise was renamed to Red Sox
  • First pitcher to pitch multiple no-hitters for the Red Sox
[10]
5July 29, 1911 Smokey Joe Wood 5–04 St. Louis Browns Bill Carrigan Silk O'Laughlin (2) Patsy Donovan [11]
6June 21, 1916 Rube Foster 2–02 New York Yankees Pinch Thomas George Hildebrand Bill Carrigan (1) [12]
7August 30, 1916 Dutch Leonard £(1)4–02 St. Louis Browns Pinch Thomas (1) Brick Owens (1) Bill Carrigan (2) [12]
8June 23, 1917 Babe Ruth £* (0 IP)
Ernie Shore (9 IP)
4–01 Washington Senators Pinch Thomas (1)
Sam Agnew (1)
Brick Owens (2) Jack Barry
  • First combined no-hitter in MLB history. First game of a doubleheader. Ruth and Thomas were ejected for arguing balls and strikes after walking the first batter, who was then caught stealing. Shore retired the next 26 in a row for a no-hitter completely in relief.
[13]
9June 3, 1918 Dutch Leonard £(2)5–05@ Detroit Tigers Sam Agnew (2) Bill Dinneen (1) Ed Barrow
  • Last pitcher to pitch multiple no-hitters for the Red Sox
[14]
10September 7, 1923 Howard Ehmke 4–01@ Philadelphia Athletics Val Picinich Bill Dinneen (2) Frank Chance [15]
11July 14, 1956 Mel Parnell £4–03 Chicago White Sox Sammy White Bill Summers Pinky Higgins (1)
  • Second game of a doubleheader
[16]
12June 26, 1962 Earl Wilson 2–04 Los Angeles Angels Bob Tillman (1) Harry Schwarts Pinky Higgins (2)
  • Wilson hit a home run
[17]
13August 1, 1962 Bill Monbouquette 1–01@ Chicago White Sox Jim Pagliaroni Bill McKinley Pinky Higgins (3)
  • Smallest margin of victory in a franchise's no-hitter
  • Shortest interval between no-hitters in franchise history
[18]
14September 16, 1965 Dave Morehead 2–01 Cleveland Indians Bob Tillman (2) Ed Runge Billy Herman
  • On the same day, the Red Sox fired Pinky Higgins as their general manager
[19]
15April 4, 2001 Hideo Nomo 3–04@ Baltimore Orioles Jason Varitek (1) Eric Cooper Jimy Williams
  • Made Red Sox debut for Nomo
  • Game 2 of season
  • Longest interval between no-hitters in franchise history
  • Earliest calendar date of franchise's no-hitter
  • Earliest calendar date of no-hitter in MLB history
  • First no-hitter thrown at Camden Yards
[20]
16April 27, 2002 Derek Lowe 10–02 Tampa Bay Devil Rays Jason Varitek (2) Steve Rippley Grady Little
  • Shortest interval between no-hitters at Fenway Park in franchise history
  • Largest margin of victory in a franchise's no-hitter (tie)
[21]
17September 1, 2007 Clay Buchholz 10–04 Baltimore Orioles Jason Varitek (3) Joe West Terry Francona (1)
  • Second career game for Buchholz
  • Largest margin of victory in a franchise's no-hitter (tie)
[22]
18May 19, 2008 Jon Lester £7–03 Kansas City Royals Jason Varitek (4) Brian Knight Terry Francona (2)
  • Most recent no-hitter in franchise history
  • First time since the 1974 California Angels that one team had last two no-hitters in the Majors
  • Varitek sets the record for most no-hitters caught
[23]

See also

Footnotes

Related Research Articles

No-hitter Also called a no-no, a baseball game in which a team was not able to record a single hit

In baseball, a no-hitter is a game in which a team was not able to record a single hit. Major League Baseball (MLB) officially defines a no-hitter as a completed game in which a team that batted in at least nine innings recorded no hits. A pitcher who prevents the opposing team from achieving a hit is said to have "thrown a no-hitter". This is a rare accomplishment for a pitcher or pitching staff—only 303 have been thrown in MLB history since 1876, an average of about two per year. In most cases, no-hitters are recorded by a single pitcher who throws a complete game; one thrown by two or more pitchers is a combined no-hitter. The most recent major league no-hitter by a single pitcher was thrown on September 1, 2019, by Justin Verlander of the Houston Astros against the Toronto Blue Jays at Rogers Centre. The most recent combined no-hitter was thrown on August 3, 2019, by Aaron Sanchez, Will Harris, Joe Biagini, and Chris Devenski of the Astros against the Seattle Mariners at Minute Maid Park.

Don Larsen American professional baseball player, pitcher

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Bill Monbouquette American baseball player and coach

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Clay Buchholz American professional baseball pitcher

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Christopher Allen Sale is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played in MLB for the Chicago White Sox, with whom he made his major league debut on August 6, 2010. As a power pitcher, Sale excels at achieving high numbers of strikeouts, and has set a number of strikeout-related records. He bats and throws left-handed, stands 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m), and weighs 180 pounds (82 kg).

Wade Miley American baseball player

Wade Allen Miley is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Houston Astros of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has played in MLB for the Arizona Diamondbacks, Boston Red Sox, Seattle Mariners, Baltimore Orioles and Milwaukee Brewers. He played college baseball at Southeastern Louisiana University.

References

General reference
Inline citations
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