List of FA Amateur Cup finals

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North Shields celebrating their 1969 FA Amateur Cup win North shields fc cup winners.jpg
North Shields celebrating their 1969 FA Amateur Cup win

The Football Association Amateur Cup, commonly known as the FA Amateur Cup, was a national knockout cup competition for English amateur football clubs, which was organised by, and named after, the FA (The Football Association). It was staged for the first time in the 1893–94 season, in response to the increasing domination of the sport by professional teams. [1] It was discontinued after the 1973–74 season, when the FA abolished their policy whereby all clubs were officially considered to be either professional or amateur in status. [2] Thereafter, teams which had competed in the Amateur Cup instead either joined the existing FA Trophy or entered the newly created FA Vase. [3]

Contents

The competition was staged 71 times and 36 different clubs won the Cup. [4] The first tournament was won by Old Carthusians, who beat Casuals in a match held at the Richmond Athletic Ground. [5] The record for the most wins is held by Bishop Auckland, with ten victories, [4] followed by Clapton and Crook Town with five wins each. [4] The final club to win the tournament was Bishop's Stortford, who defeated Ilford in the 1974 final. [6]

History

The first tournament featured amateur teams from throughout England and was won by Old Carthusians, the team for former pupils of Charterhouse School, who defeated Casuals. [7] The Carthusians had won England's premier national competition, the FA Cup, in 1881, [8] and thus became the first team to win both cups. The only other club to achieve this feat was Wimbledon, [1] who won the Amateur Cup in 1963 and the FA Cup in 1988. [4] [8] With the exception of a second win for Carthusians and a victory for Old Malvernians, the competition's first decade was dominated by teams from the north-east of the country, including Middlesbrough, Bishop Auckland and Stockton, who each won the competition twice. [4] Southern clubs were the most successful during the inter-war period, winning the tournament 15 times in 19 seasons. [9]

By the start of the Second World War, Bishop Auckland had won the Amateur Cup seven times, and Clapton five times. [4] Interest in the competition peaked soon after the war, and the final was moved to Wembley Stadium, which attracted crowds of up to 100,000. [7] In 1954, Crook Town defeated Bishop Auckland to win the Amateur Cup for the second time, over fifty years after the club's previous victory. The "Bishops" won the final for the next three seasons, the only hat-trick of wins in the competition's history. [4] This took the club's number of wins to 10, a figure that was never surpassed. [4] Crook Town themselves also went on to win the tournament three more times. [4]

In the 1960s, interest in the Amateur Cup declined and crowds for the final dropped to less than half the level of the early Wembley finals. [10] During the last decade of the tournament's existence, Enfield claimed two wins. [4] The last Amateur Cup final was held on 20 April 1974, and Bishop's Stortford became the last tournament winners, defeating Ilford 41. [6] In the same year, the FA abandoned its policy of classifying all clubs as either fully professional or fully amateur, and accordingly the Amateur Cup was abolished. [2]

Finals

Kingstonian players, officials, and fans celebrate winning the Amateur Cup in 1933. KingstonianAmateurCup.jpg
Kingstonian players, officials, and fans celebrate winning the Amateur Cup in 1933.

If the final finished with the scores level after extra time, the teams would play again in a replay at a later date. [4] Penalty shoot-outs were never used. [4] The competition was not staged during the First or Second World Wars, other than in the 1914–15 season. [4] Where the venue is shown in italics, only the town where the final took place is recorded, rather than the name of the specific stadium.

Key

(R)Replay
(2R)Second replay
*Match went to extra time

Results

SeasonWinnerScoreRunners–upVenueNotes
1893–94 Old Carthusians 2–1 Casuals Athletic Ground, Richmond [5]
1894–95 Middlesbrough 2–1 Old Carthusians Headingley Stadium [5]
1895–96 Bishop Auckland 1–0 Royal Artillery Portsmouth Walnut Street, Leicester [11]
1896–97 Old Carthusians 1–1 * Stockton Tufnell Park [A] [12]
1896–97 (R) Old Carthusians 4–1 Stockton Feethams [12]
1897–98 Middlesbrough 2–1 Uxbridge Crystal Palace [12]
1898–99 Stockton 1–0 Harwich & Parkeston Linthorpe Road, Middlesbrough [13]
1899–1900 Bishop Auckland 5–1 Lowestoft Town Filbert Street [14] [15]
1900–01 Crook Town 1–1 * King's Lynn Dovercourt [A] [15]
1900–01 (R) Crook Town 3–0 King's Lynn Ipswich [A] [15]
1901–02 Old Malvernians 5–1 Bishop Auckland Headingley Stadium [16]
1902–03 Stockton 0–0 * Oxford City Reading [A] [16]
1902–03 (R) Stockton 1–0 Oxford City Feethams [16]
1903–04 Sheffield 3–1 Ealing Valley Parade [17] [18]
1904–05 West Hartlepool 3–2 Clapton Shepherd's Bush [A] [19]
1905–06 Oxford City 3–0 Bishop Auckland Stockton-on-Tees [A] [20]
1906–07 Clapton 2–1 Stockton Stamford Bridge [20]
1907–08 Depot Bn., Royal Engineers 2–1 Stockton Bishop Auckland [A] [21]
1908–09 Clapton 6–0 Eston United Ilford [A] [22]
1909–10 RMLI Gosport 2–1 South Bank Bishop Auckland [A] [23]
1910–11 Bromley 1–0 Bishop Auckland ground of West Norwood F.C., Herne Hill [24] [25] [26]
1911–12 Stockton 0–0 * Eston United Ayresome Park [27]
1911–12 (R) Stockton 1–0 Eston United Ayresome Park [27]
1912–13 South Bank 1–1 * Oxford City Elm Park [28] [29]
1912–13 (R) South Bank 1–0 Oxford City Kingsway, Bishop Auckland [30] [29]
1913–14 Bishop Auckland 1–0 Northern Nomads Elland Road [31] [32]
1914–15 Clapton 1–0 Bishop Auckland The Den [33] [34]
1919–20 Dulwich Hamlet 1–0 Tufnell Park The Den [35]
1920–21 Bishop Auckland 4–2 Swindon Victoria Ayresome Park [36]
1921–22 Bishop Auckland 5–2 * South Bank Ayresome Park [37]
1922–23 London Caledonians 2–1 Evesham Town Crystal Palace [38]
1923–24 Clapton 3–0 Erith & Belvedere The Den [39]
1924–25 Clapton 2–1 Southall The Den [40]
1925–26 Northern Nomads 7–1 Stockton Roker Park [41]
1926–27 Leyton 3–1 Barking Town The Den [42]
1927–28 Leyton 3–2 Cockfield Ayresome Park [43]
1928–29 Ilford 3–1 Leyton Arsenal Stadium [44]
1929–30 Ilford 5–1 Bournemouth Gasworks Athletic Boleyn Ground [45]
1930–31 Wycombe Wanderers 1–0 Hayes Arsenal Stadium [46]
1931–32 Dulwich Hamlet 7–1 Marine Boleyn Ground [47]
1932–33 Kingstonian 1–1 * Stockton Champion Hill [48]
1932–33 (R) Kingstonian 4–1 Stockton Feethams [48]
1933–34 Dulwich Hamlet 2–1 Leyton Boleyn Ground [49]
1934–35 Bishop Auckland 0–0 * Wimbledon Ayresome Park [50] [51]
1934–35 (R) Bishop Auckland 2–1 Wimbledon Stamford Bridge [51]
1935–36 Casuals 1–1 * Ilford Selhurst Park [52]
1935–36 (R) Casuals 2–0 Ilford Boleyn Ground [52]
1936–37 Dulwich Hamlet 2–0 Leyton Boleyn Ground [53]
1937–38 Bromley 1–0 Erith & Belvedere The Den [54]
1938–39 Bishop Auckland 3–0 Willington Roker Park [55]
1945–46 Barnet 3–2 Bishop Auckland Stamford Bridge [56]
1946–47 Leytonstone 2–1 Wimbledon Arsenal Stadium [57]
1947–48 Leytonstone 1–0 Barnet Stamford Bridge [58]
1948–49 Bromley 1–0 Romford Wembley Stadium [59]
1949–50 Willington 4–0 Bishop Auckland Wembley Stadium [60]
1950–51 Pegasus 2–1 Bishop Auckland Wembley Stadium [61]
1951–52 Walthamstow Avenue 2–1 Leyton Wembley Stadium [62]
1952–53 Pegasus 6–0 Harwich & Parkeston Wembley Stadium [63]
1953–54 Crook Town 2–2 * Bishop Auckland Wembley Stadium [64]
1953–54 (R) Crook Town 2–2 * Bishop Auckland St James' Park [64]
1953–54 (2R) Crook Town 1–0 Bishop Auckland Ayresome Park [64]
1954–55 Bishop Auckland 2–0 Hendon Wembley Stadium [65]
1955–56 Bishop Auckland 1–1 * Corinthian-Casuals Wembley Stadium [66]
1955–56 (R) Bishop Auckland 4–1 Corinthian-Casuals Ayresome Park [66]
1956–57 Bishop Auckland 3–1 Wycombe Wanderers Wembley Stadium [67]
1957–58 Woking 3–0 Ilford Wembley Stadium [68]
1958–59 Crook Town 3–2 Barnet Wembley Stadium [69]
1959–60 Hendon 2–1 Kingstonian Wembley Stadium [70]
1960–61 Walthamstow Avenue 2–1 West Auckland Town Wembley Stadium [71]
1961–62 Crook Town 1–1 * Hounslow Town Wembley Stadium [72]
1961–62 (R) Crook Town 4–0 Hounslow Town Ayresome Park [72]
1962–63 Wimbledon 4–2 Sutton United Wembley Stadium [73]
1963–64 Crook Town 2–1 Enfield Wembley Stadium [74]
1964–65 Hendon 3–1 Whitby Town Wembley Stadium [75]
1965–66 Wealdstone 3–1 Hendon Wembley Stadium [76]
1966–67 Enfield 0–0 * Skelmersdale United Wembley Stadium [77]
1966–67 (R) Enfield 3–0 Skelmersdale United Maine Road [77]
1967–68 Leytonstone 1–0 Chesham United Wembley Stadium [78]
1968–69 North Shields 2–1 Sutton United Wembley Stadium [79]
1969–70 Enfield 5–1 Dagenham Wembley Stadium [80]
1970–71 Skelmersdale United 4–1 Dagenham Wembley Stadium [81]
1971–72 Hendon 2–0 Enfield Wembley Stadium [82]
1972–73 Walton & Hersham 1–0 Slough Town Wembley Stadium [83]
1973–74 Bishop's Stortford 4–1 Ilford Wembley Stadium [6]

Wins by team

ClubWinsYears
Bishop Auckland 101896, 1900, 1914, 1921, 1922, 1935, 1939, 1955, 1956, 1957
Clapton 51907, 1909, 1915, 1924, 1925
Crook Town 51901, 1954, 1959, 1962, 1964
Dulwich Hamlet 41920, 1932, 1934, 1937
Bromley 31911, 1938, 1949
Hendon 31960, 1965, 1972
Leytonstone 31947, 1948, 1968
Stockton 31899, 1903, 1912
Enfield 21967, 1970
Ilford 21929, 1930
Leyton 21927, 1928
Middlesbrough 21895, 1898
Old Carthusians 21894, 1897
Pegasus 21951, 1953
Walthamstow Avenue 21952, 1961
Barnet 11946
Bishop's Stortford 11974
Casuals 11936
Depot Bn., Royal Engineers 11908
Kingstonian 11933
London Caledonians 11923
North Shields 11969
Northern Nomads 11926
Old Malvernians 11902
Oxford City 11906
RMLI Gosport 11910
Sheffield 11904
Skelmersdale United 11971
South Bank 11913
Walton & Hersham 11973
Wealdstone 11966
West Hartlepool 11905
Willington 11950
Wimbledon 11963
Woking 11958
Wycombe Wanderers 11931

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