List of FIFA Women's World Cup own goals

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This is a list of all own goals scored during FIFA Women's World Cup matches (not including qualification games).

An own goal is an event in competitive goal-scoring sports where a player scores on their own side of the playing area rather than the one defended by the opponent. Own goals sometimes result from the opponent's defensive strength, as when the player is stopped in the scoring area, but can also happen by accident. Since own goals are often added to the opponent's score, they are often an embarrassing blunder for the scoring player, but in certain sports are occasionally done for strategic reasons.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

FIFA Women's World Cup qualification is the process a national women's association football team goes through to qualify for the FIFA Women's World Cup.

Contents

Nigeria and the United States have scored three own goals for their opponents, while Norway has benefited from four own goals. Of the 23 matches with own goals, the team scoring the own goal has won four times and drawn three times. [n 1]

The only player to score two own goals is Angie Ponce from Ecuador, scoring twice for Switzerland in 2015. She later scored Ecuador's first World Cup goals in the same match. [1]

Angie Ponce is an Ecuadorian semi-professional footballer. She was part of the Ecuadorian squad for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. Ponce holds the record for being the first, and only, player to have scored two own goals in a Women's World Cup match. In the 2015 World Cup, she scored two own goals in a single game against Switzerland in their Group C match on 12 June. However, in the same game, she scored a penalty which was the first ever Women's World Cup goal for Ecuador.

List

Key
Player's team won the match
Player's team drew the match
Seq.PlayerTimeRepresentingGoalFinal
score
OpponentTournamentRoundDateFIFA
report
1. Julia Campbell 30'Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 0–10–4Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1991, China Group stage19 November 1991 report
2. Sayuri Yamaguchi 70'Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0–80–8Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 19 November 1991 report
3. Ifeanyi Chiejine 19'Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0–11–7Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1999, United States Group stage24 June 1999 report
4. Hiromi Isozaki 26'Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0–20–4Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 26 June 1999 report
5. Brandi Chastain 5'Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0–13–2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Quarter-finals1 July 1999 report
6. Dianne Alagich 39'Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 1–11–2Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 2003, United States Group stage21 September 2003 report
7. Eva González 9'Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 0–11–6Flag of England.svg  England 2007, China Group stage17 September 2007 report
8. Trine Rønning 42'Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0–10–3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Semi-finals26 September 2007 report
9. Leslie Osborne 20'Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0–10–4Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 27 September 2007 report
10. Daiane 2'Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0–12–2 aet [lower-alpha 1] Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2011, Germany Quarter-finals10 July 2011 report
11. Desire Oparanozie 21'Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0–13–3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2015, Canada Group stage8 June 2015 report
12. Angie Ponce 24'Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 0–11–10Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 12 June 2015 report
13. Angie Ponce 71'Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 0–81–10Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 12 June 2015 report
14. Jennifer Ruiz 9'Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 0–20–5Flag of France.svg  France 17 June 2015 report
15. Laura Bassett 90+2'Flag of England.svg  England 1–21–2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Semi-finals1 July 2015 report
16. Julie Johnston 52'Flag of the United States.svg  United States 4–25–2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Final5 July 2015 report
17. Osinachi Ohale 37'Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0–30–3Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2019, France Group stage8 June 2019 report
18. Kim Do-yeon 29'Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 0–10–2Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 12 June 2019 report
19. Wendie Renard 54'Flag of France.svg  France 1–12–1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 12 June 2019 report
20. Mônica 66'Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2–32–3Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 13 June 2019 report
21. Lee Alexander 79'Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 3–23–3Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 19 June 2019 report
22. Aurelle Awona 80'Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 1–12–1Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 20 June 2019 report
23. Waraporn Boonsing 48'Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 0–10–2Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 20 June 2019 report
24. Jonna Andersson 50'Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 0–20–2Flag of the United States.svg  United States 20 June 2019 report
Notes
  1. Brazil lost 3–5 on penalty kicks.

Statistics and notable own goals

Time
  • Daiane, 2', Brazil vs United States, 2011.
  • Ecuador vs Switzerland, 2015. Angie Ponce of Ecuador scored twice for Switzerland.
Tournament
Teams

The Ecuadorian women's national football team represents Ecuador in international women's football.

The Switzerland women's national football team represents Switzerland in international women's football. The team played its first match in 1972.

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

Players

Ifeanyichukwu Stephanie Chiejine is a Nigerian football striker currently playing for SSVSM-Kairat Almaty in the Kazakhstani Championship. She has also played for FC Indiana in USA's W-League, KMF Kuopio and PK-35 Vantaa in Finland and Zvezda Perm in Russia.

  • Mônica, age 32, Brazil vs Australia, 2019
  • Brandi Chastain of the United States scored against Germany in 1999
  • Eva González of Argentina scored against England in 2007
  • Trine Rønning of Norway scored against Thailand in 2015
  • Angie Ponce of Ecuador scored against Switzerland in 2015
  • Wendie Renard of France scored twice against South Korea, once against Nigeria, and once against the United States in 2019
  • Julie Ertz (née Johnston) of the United States scored against Chile in 2019
Various
  • The own goal scored by Brazilian Mônica for Australia in 2019 was the first own goal to be confirmed by VAR.
  • Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador has scored more own goals (two) than regular goals (one).
  • Flag of Chile.svg  Chile has benefited from as many own goals (one) as regular goals (one).

By team

Own goals by nations
TeamOwn goals by
own playersopponents
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 31
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 33
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 20
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 21
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 22
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 10
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 10
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 10
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 10
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 10
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 11
Flag of England.svg  England 11
Flag of France.svg  France 11
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 11
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 12
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 14
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 01
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 01
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 02
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 02

See also

Notes

  1. As per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.

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References

  1. "Records tumble, holders advance and heavyweights collide". FIFA. 13 June 2015. Retrieved 13 June 2015.