List of Qing imperial residents in Tibet

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The residence of the Amban in Tiebet Zhu Cang Da Chen Ya Men .png
The residence of the Amban in Tiebet
The letter from Governor Wenshuo to the Prime Minister of Nepal, in 1887 A letter from Tibet Governor to a Nepali official.png
The letter from Governor Wenshuo to the Prime Minister of Nepal, in 1887

From 1727 until 1912, roughly corresponded to the era of Tibet under Qing rule, the Qing Emperor appointed "imperial commissioner-resident of Tibet" (Chinese : 欽差駐藏辦事大臣). The official rank of the imperial resident is amban (Tibetan: བོད་བཞུགས་ཨམ་བན, bod bzhugs am ban, colloquially "High Commissioner"). With increasing diplomatic contacts between the British and the Qing in from the 1890s, some Assistant imperial resident (Chinese : 欽差駐藏幫辦大臣) are just as notable as his senior. The most notable assistant was Feng Quan, who was assassinated in the Batang uprising in 1905.

Contents

List

The ethnicity of several ambans are unknown. Of the 80 ambans, most were Manchu and four were Han Chinese: Zhou Ying, Bao Jinzhong, Meng Bao, and Zhao Erfeng. At least fifteen Mongols were known to have served as ambasa, perhaps more.

(H=Han Chinese, M=Mongol, ?=unknown, unmarked=Manchu)

  • Assistant: An Cheng [1]
  • Assistant: Naqin [1]
  • Assistant: Gui Lin 桂霖 [2]
  • Assistant: Feng Quan 鳳全 placed at Chamdo (Manchu)

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Xiuyu Wang 2011, pp. 90–91.
  2. Coleman 2014, pp. 211-212.
  3. Hui Wang 2011, p. 167.
  4. 1 2 3 Xiuyu Wang 2011, p. 91.
  5. Ho 2008, p. 212.
  6. Teichman, Eric (28 February 2019). Travels of a consular officer in eastern tibet. CUP Archive. p. 22. Retrieved 28 June 2011.
Sources