List of United States commemorative coins and medals (1800s)

Last updated

1848

Circulating coins

Face valueCoinObverse designReverse designCompositionMintageAvailableObverseReverse
$2.50 "CAL" Liberty quarter eagle [Note 1] Standard Liberty Head quarter eagle obverseStandard Liberty Head quarter eagle reverse with "CAL." punched into the field90% Au, 10% Cu Uncirculated:

1,389 (P) [1]

Contents

1848 NNC-US-1848-G$2 1/2 -Liberty Head (CAL) (obverse).jpg NNC-US-1848-G$2 1/2 -Liberty Head (CAL) (reverse).jpg

1892

Non-circulating coins

Face valueCoinObverse designReverse designCompositionMintageAvailableObverseReverse
50¢ Columbian half dollar Christopher Columbus Port view of the Santa María above two hemispheres flanked by the date 149290% Ag, 10% CuAuthorized:

5,000,000 (max 1892-1893 total)

Uncirculated:

950,000 (P)

1892 [2] Columbian exposition half dollar commemorative obverse.jpg Columbian exposition half dollar commemorative reverse.jpg

1893

Non-circulating coins

Face valueCoinObverse designReverse designCompositionMintageAvailableObverseReverse
25¢ Isabella quarter Isabella I of Castile Kneeling female with distaff and spindle, symbolizing women's industry90% Ag, 10% CuAuthorized:

40,000 (max)

Uncirculated:

40,023 (P) [3]

1893 Isabella quarter obverse.jpg Isabella quarter reverse.jpg
50¢Columbian half dollarChristopher ColumbusPort view of the Santa María above two hemispheres flanked by the date 149290% Ag, 10% CuUncirculated:

4,052,105 (P) [4]

1893 1893 Columbian Half NGC MS62 Obverse.png 1893 Columbian Half NGC MS62 Reverse.png

1899

Non-circulating coins

Face valueCoinObverse designReverse designCompositionMintageAvailableObverseReverse
$1 Lafayette dollar
(dated 1900)
Conjoined busts of George Washington and Lafayette Equestrian statue of Lafayette90% Ag, 10% Cu Authorized:

50,000 (max)

Uncirculated:

50,026 (P) [5]

1900 Lafayette memorial commemorative dollar obverse.jpg Lafayette memorial commemorative dollar reverse.jpg

Notes

^1 The 1848 "CAL" quarter eagle was not popular with numismatists, and all unsold coins were placed into circulation. The coin commemorated the California Gold Rush.

Related Research Articles

Coins of the United States dollar were first minted in 1792. New coins have been produced annually and they make up a valuable aspect of the United States currency system. Today, circulating coins exist in denominations of 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, 50¢, and $1.00. Also minted are bullion and commemorative coins. All of these are produced by the United States Mint. The coins are then sold to Federal Reserve Banks which in turn are responsible for putting coins into circulation and withdrawing them as demanded by the country's economy.

United States Mint Produces circulating coinage for the United States

The United States Mint is a bureau of the Department of the Treasury responsible for producing coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion. It does not produce paper money; that responsibility belongs to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The first United States Mint was created in Philadelphia in 1792, and soon joined by other centers, whose coins were identified by their own mint marks. There are currently four active coin-producing mints: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point.

United States commemorative coins

The United States Mint has minted numerous commemorative coins to commemorate persons, places, events, and institutions since 1848. Many of these coins are not intended for general circulation, but are still legal tender. The mint also produces commemorative medals, which are similar to coins but do not have a face value, and therefore are not legal tender.

United States cent mintage figures

Below are the mintage figures for the United States cent.

Carson City Mint United States historic place

The Carson City Mint was a branch of the United States Mint in Carson City, Nevada. It primarily minted silver coins; however, it also minted gold coins, with a total face value in dollars nearly equal to that of its silver coins. The mint minted coins in 21 different years.

West Point Mint Branch of the United States Mint

The West Point Mint Facility is a U.S. Mint production and depository facility erected in 1937 near the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York, United States. The mint is part of the US Bullion Depository system and as of 2019, holds 22% of the United States' gold reserves, or approximately 54 million ounces. The mint at West Point is second only to the gold reserves held in secure storage at Fort Knox. Originally, the West Point Mint was called the West Point Bullion Depository. At one point it had the highest concentration of silver of any U.S. mint facility, and for 12 years produced circulating pennies. It has since minted mostly commemorative coins and stored gold.

Quarter eagle

The quarter eagle was a gold coin issued by the United States with a denomination of two hundred and fifty cents, or two dollars and fifty cents. It was given its name in the Coinage Act of 1792, as a derivation from the US ten-dollar eagle coin. Its purchasing power in 1800 would be equivalent to $71.12 in 2015 dollars.

Half union

The Half union was a United States pattern coin with a face value of fifty U.S. Dollars. It is often thought of as one of the most significant and well-known patterns in the history of the U.S. Mint. The basic design, featuring Liberty on the obverse, was slightly modified from the similar $20 "Liberty Head" Double Eagle, which was designed by James B. Longacre and minted from 1849 to 1907.

Bridgeport, Connecticut, Centennial half dollar 1936 US commemorative coin

The Bridgeport, Connecticut, Centennial half dollar is a commemorative fifty-cent piece issued in 1936 by the United States Bureau of the Mint to honor the 100th anniversary of the incorporation of Bridgeport, Connecticut, as a city. Designed by Henry Kreis, the obverse depicts the showman P. T. Barnum, who was one of Bridgeport's most famous residents, was mayor of the city, helped develop it, and is buried there. The reverse depicts a stylized eagle.

Capped Bust Former design used on United States coinage

The Capped Bust coinage of the United States consisted of a half dime, dime, quarter and half dollar.

United States Sesquicentennial coinage 1926 commemorative US half dollar and quarter eagle

The United States Sesquicentennial coin issue consisted of a commemorative half dollar and quarter eagle struck in 1926 at the Philadelphia Mint for the 150th anniversary of American independence. The obverse of the half dollar features portraits of the first president, George Washington, and the president in 1926, Calvin Coolidge, making it the only American coin to depict a president in his lifetime.

Arkansas Centennial half dollar

The Arkansas Centennial half dollar was minted during the 1930s.

Arkansas-Robinson half dollar

The Arkansas-Robinson half dollar was a special issue of the Arkansas Centennial half dollar, minted in 1936 and featuring a different design.

Continental Currency dollar coin Early United States coin

The Continental Currency dollar coin was the first pattern coin struck for the United States. The coins were minted in 1776 and examples were made on pewter, brass, and silver planchets.

Below are the mintage figures for the United States quarter.

References

  1. "1848 "CAL" Liberty Quarter Eagle" . Retrieved 2019-03-29.
  2. "1892-1893 Columbian Exposition Half Dollar Commemorative Coin" . Retrieved 2019-04-11.
  3. "The Early Quarter Dollars of the United States: Commemorative Coins of the United States (Page 10)". PCGS. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  4. "The Early Quarter Dollars of the United States: Commemorative Coins of the United States (Page 5)". www.pcgs.com. Retrieved 2019-06-20.
  5. Khachatryan, G. S.; Alaverdyan, A. A. (1975). "[Changes in the content of ribosomal RNA and the activity of ribosomal RNAase in the brain under natural physiological conditions]". Voprosy Meditsinskoi Khimii. 21 (3): 264–268. ISSN   0042-8809. PMID   1900.