List of United States senators from Vermont

Last updated

Current delegation

Vermont was admitted to the Union on March 4, 1791. From the 1850s until well into the 20th century, Vermont was always represented by members of the Republican Party. Its current United States senators are Democrat Patrick Leahy and Independent Bernie Sanders. Leahy is the only Democrat ever elected to the Senate from Vermont, making Vermont have the longest current split senate delegation though both Independents, Jim Jeffords and Sanders, have caucused with the Senate Democrats since 2001. Having been in office since 1975, Leahy is currently the most senior incumbent Senator, and is the last one to have served during the presidency of Gerald Ford. Vermont is the only State that has never sent a woman to Congress. [1] [2]

Contents

List of senators

Class 1

Class 1 U.S. senators belong to the electoral cycle that has recently been contested in 2000, 2006, 2012, and 2018. The next election will be in 2024.

C

Class 3

Class 3 U.S. senators belong to the electoral cycle that has recently been contested in 1998, 2004, 2010, and 2016. The next election will be in 2022.

#SenatorPartyDates in officeElectoral historyTTElectoral historyDates in officePartySenator#
VacantMarch 4, 1791 –
October 17, 1791
Vermont elected its senators several months after statehood.1 2nd 1Vermont elected its senators several months after statehood.March 4, 1791 –
October 17, 1791
Vacant
1 Mosesrobinson.jpg
Moses Robinson
Anti-
Administration
October 17, 1791 –
October 15, 1796
Elected October 17, 1791.

Resigned.
Elected October 17, 1791.

Lost re-election.
October 17, 1791 –
March 3, 1795
Anti-
Administration
StephenRBradley.jpg
Stephen R. Bradley
1
3rd
Democratic-
Republican
4th 2 Elected in 1794.March 4, 1795 –
September 1, 1801
Federalist Senatorelijahpaine.jpg
Elijah Paine
2
VacantOctober 15, 1796 –
October 18, 1796
 
2 Isaac Tichenor.jpg
Isaac Tichenor
Federalist October 18, 1796 –
October 17, 1797
Elected October 18, 1796 to finish Robinson's term.
Elected October 18, 1796 to full term.

Resigned to become Governor of Vermont.
2 5th
3 Nathaniel Chipman (US Senator from Vermont).jpg
Nathaniel Chipman
Federalist October 17, 1797 –
March 3, 1803
Elected in 1797 to finish Tichenor's term.

Lost re-election.
6th
7th 3 Re-elected October 21, 1800.

Resigned.
 September 1, 1801 –
October 15, 1801
Vacant
Elected to finish Paine's term.October 15, 1801 –
March 3, 1813
Democratic-
Republican
StephenRBradley.jpg
Stephen R. Bradley
3
4 Israel Smith Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1803 –
October 1, 1807
Elected in 1802.

Resigned.
3 8th
9th
10th 4 Re-elected in 1806.

Retired.
VacantOctober 1, 1807 –
October 10, 1807
 
5 Jonathan Robinson Democratic-
Republican
October 10, 1807 –
March 3, 1815
Elected to finish Smith's term.
Re-elected in 1808. [3]

Retired.
4 11th
12th
13th 5 Elected October 21, 1812. [4]

Resigned.
March 4, 1813 –
November 3, 1817
Democratic-
Republican
Dudley Chase 4
6 Isaac Tichenor.jpg
Isaac Tichenor
Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1821
Elected October 25, 1814. [5]

Retired. [6]
5 14th
15th
Elected to finish Chase's term.

Resigned to serve as collector of customs for the district of Vermont.
November 4, 1817 –
January 8, 1818
Democratic-
Republican
James Fisk politician.jpg
James Fisk
5
 January 8, 1818 –
October 20, 1818
Vacant
Elected to finish Fisk's term.October 20, 1818 –
March 3, 1825
Democratic-
Republican
William A. Palmer.jpg
William A. Palmer
6
16th 6 Elected October 20, 1818 to the following term.

Retired.
7 Horatio seymour.jpg
Horatio Seymour
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1833
Elected in 1821.6 17th
18th
Anti-
Jacksonian
19th 7 Elected in 1825.

Declined to run for reelection. [7]
March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1831
Anti-
Jacksonian
Dudley Chase 7
Re-elected in 1827.

Retired to run for Governor of Vermont;
7 20th
21st
22nd 8 Elected in 1831.March 4, 1831 –
April 11, 1842
Anti-
Jacksonian
SPrentiss.jpg
Samuel Prentiss
8
8 BSwift.jpg
Benjamin Swift
Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1839
Elected in 1833.

Retired.
8 23rd
24th
Whig 25th 9 Re-elected in 1837.

Resigned.
Whig
9 Samuel Shethar Phelps.jpg
Samuel S. Phelps
Whig March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1851
Elected in 1839.9 26th
27th
 April 11, 1842 –
April 23, 1842
Vacant
Appointed to continue Prentiss's term.

Elected October 26, 1842 to finish Prentiss's term. [8]

Retired.
April 23, 1842 –
March 3, 1843
Whig Samuel Crafts.jpg
Samuel C. Crafts
9
28th 10 Elected in 1843.March 4, 1843 –
January 14, 1853
Whig WUpham.jpg
William Upham
10
Re-elected in 1845.

Defeated for reelection in 1850. [9]
10 29th
30th
31st 11 Re-elected in 1848.

Died.
10 Solomon Foot - Brady-Handy.jpg
Solomon Foot
Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 28, 1866
Elected in 1850.11 32nd
 January 14, 1853 –
January 17, 1853
Vacant
Appointed to continue Upham's term.

Lost entitlement to sit. [lower-alpha 1]
January 17, 1853 –
March 16, 1854
Whig Samuel Shethar Phelps.jpg
Samuel S. Phelps
11
33rd
 March 16, 1854 –
October 14, 1854
Vacant
Elected to finish Upham's term.

Retired.
October 14, 1854 –
March 3, 1855
Free Soil Lawrence Brainerd.jpg
Lawrence Brainerd
12
Republican 34th 12 Elected in 1855.March 4, 1855 –
November 9, 1865
Republican JCollamer2.jpg
Jacob Collamer
13
Re-elected in 1856.12 35th
36th
37th 13 Re-elected in 1861.

Died.
Re-elected in 1862.

Died.
13 38th
39th
 November 9, 1865 –
November 21, 1865
Vacant
Appointed to continue Collamer's term.

Elected October 24, 1866 to finish Collamer's term. [8]

Lost re-election.
November 21, 1865 –
March 3, 1867
Republican Luke Potter Poland.jpg
Luke P. Poland
14
VacantMarch 28, 1866 –
April 3, 1866
 
11 George F. Edmunds - Brady-Handy.jpg
George F. Edmunds
Republican April 3, 1866 –
November 1, 1891
Appointed to continue Foot's term.

Elected October 24, 1866 to finish Foot's term. [8]
40th 14 Elected in 1866.March 4, 1867 –
December 28, 1898
Republican Justin Smith Morrill - Brady-Handy.jpg
Justin S. Morrill
15
Re-elected in 1868.14 41st
42nd
43rd 15 Re-elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.15 44th
45th
46th 16 Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.16 47th
48th
49th 17 Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.

Resigned to start a law practice.
17 50th
51st
52nd 18 Re-elected in 1890.
12 Redfield Proctor, bw photo portrait, 1904.jpg
Redfield Proctor
Republican November 2, 1891 –
March 4, 1908
Appointed to continue Edmunds's term.

Elected October 19, 1892 to finish Edmunds's term. [8]
Re-elected in 1892.18 53rd
54th
55th 19 Re-elected in 1896.

Died.
 December 28, 1898 –
January 11, 1899
Vacant
Appointed to continue Morrill's term.

Retired when successor elected.
January 11, 1899 –
October 18, 1900
Republican Johnathan Ross Senator.jpg
Jonathan Ross
16
Re-elected in 1898.19 56th
Elected to finish Morrill's term.October 18, 1900 –
July 12, 1923
Republican William Paul Dillingham.jpg
William P. Dillingham
17
57th
58th 20 Re-elected October 14, 1902. [11]
Re-elected in 1904.

Died.
20 59th
60th
VacantMarch 4, 1908 –
March 24, 1908
 
13 John Wolcott Stewart.jpg
John W. Stewart
Republican March 24, 1908 –
October 21, 1908
Appointed to continue Proctor's term.

Retired.
14 Carroll Smalley Page.jpg
Carroll S. Page
Republican October 21, 1908 –
March 3, 1923
Elected to finish Stewart's term.
61st 21 Re-elected October 20, 1908.
Re-elected October 18, 1910.21 62nd
63rd
64th 22 Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.

Retired.
22 65th
66th
67th 23 Re-elected in 1920.

Died.
15 FrankLGreene.jpg
Frank L. Greene
Republican March 4, 1923 –
December 17, 1930
Elected in 1922.23 68th
 July 12, 1923 –
November 7, 1923
Vacant
Elected to finish Dillingham's term.November 7, 1923 –
October 6, 1933
Republican Porter Dale Senator.jpg
Porter H. Dale
18
69th
70th 24 Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.

Died.
24 71st
VacantDecember 17, 1930 –
December 23, 1930
 
16 Frank C. Partridge.jpg
Frank C. Partridge
Republican December 23, 1930 –
March 31, 1931
Appointed to continue Greene's term.

Lost nomination to finish Greene's term.
72nd
17 Austin Warren Robinson.jpg
Warren Austin
Republican April 1, 1931 –
August 2, 1946
Elected to finish Greene's term.
73rd 25 Re-elected in 1932.

Died.
 October 6, 1933 –
November 21, 1933
Vacant
Appointed to continue Dale's term.

Elected January 17, 1934 to finish Dale's term. [8]
November 21, 1933 –
June 20, 1940
Republican Ernest W. Gibson.jpg
Ernest W. Gibson
19
Re-elected in 1934.25 74th
75th
76th 26 Re-elected in 1938.

Died.
 June 20, 1940 –
June 24, 1940
Vacant
Appointed to continue his father's term.

Retired.
June 24, 1940 –
January 3, 1941
Republican Ernest W. Gibson Jr..jpg
Ernest W. Gibson Jr.
20
Re-elected in 1940.

Resigned to become U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations
26 77th Elected in 1940 to finish Gibson's term.

Didn't take seat until January 10, 1941, as he wanted to remain Governor of Vermont. However, he was duly elected and qualified as senator.
January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1975
Republican George David Aiken.jpg
George Aiken
21
78th
79th 27 Re-elected in 1944.
VacantAugust 2, 1946 –
November 1, 1946
 
18 Ralph Edward Flanders.jpg
Ralph Flanders
Republican November 1, 1946 –
January 3, 1959
Appointed to finish Austin's term.
Elected in 1946.27 80th
81st
82nd 28 Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.

Retired.
28 83rd
84th
85th 29 Re-elected in 1956.
19 WinstonProuty.jpg
Winston L. Prouty
Republican January 3, 1959 –
September 10, 1971
Elected in 1958.29 86th
87th
88th 30 Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.30 89th
90th
91st 31 Re-elected in 1968.

Retired.
Re-elected in 1970.

Died.
31 92nd
VacantSeptember 10, 1971 –
September 16, 1971
 
20 Robert Theodore Stafford.jpg
Robert Stafford
Republican September 16, 1971 –
January 3, 1989
Appointed to continue Prouty's term.

Elected January 7, 1972 to finish Prouty's term. [12]
93rd
94th 32 Elected in 1974.January 3, 1975 –
present
Democratic Patrick Leahy official photo.jpg
Patrick Leahy
22
Re-elected in 1976.32 95th
96th
97th 33 Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.

Retired.
33 98th
99th
100th 34 Re-elected in 1986.
21 JeffordsJim(I-VT).jpg
Jim Jeffords
Republican January 3, 1989 –
June 6, 2001
Elected in 1988.34 101st
102nd
103rd 35 Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.35 104th
105th
106th 36 Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.

Changed party.

Retired.
36 107th
Independent June 6, 2001 –
January 3, 2007
108th
109th 37 Re-elected in 2004.
22 Bernie Sanders March 2020 (cropped).jpg
Bernie Sanders
Independent [lower-alpha 2] January 3, 2007 –
present
Elected in 2006.37 110th
111th
112th 38 Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.38 113th
114th
115th 39 Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.39 116th
117th
118th 40 To be determined in the 2022 election.
To be determined in the 2024 election.40 119th
#SenatorPartyYears in officeElectoral historyT TElectoral historyYears in officePartySenator#
Class 1 Class 3

Living former senators

As of January 2021, there are no living former U.S. senators from Vermont. The last living former senator and the most recently serving was Jim Jeffords (served 1989–2007), who died August 18, 2014.

See also

Notes

  1. Samuel S. Phelps was appointed by the governor during a recess of the state legislature, and the legislature later convened and adjourned a session without electing a senator to replace fill the vacancy. The Senate ruled that Phelps had lost his entitlement to sit when the legislature adjourned. [10]
  2. Although Bernie Sanders ran for the Democratic nomination in the 2020 presidential election, he has not changed his party affiliation on his own Senate webpages. [13]

Related Research Articles

The United States Senate elections of 1804 and 1805 were elections that expanded the Democratic-Republican Party's overwhelming control over the United States Senate. The Federalists went into the elections with such a small share of Senate seats that even if they had won every election, they would have still remained a minority caucus.

The United States Senate elections of 1790 and 1791 were the second series of elections of senators in the United States. In these elections, terms were up for the nine senators in Class 1. As of these elections, formal organized political parties had yet to form in the United States, but two political factions were present: The coalition of senators who supported President George Washington's administration were known as the Pro-Administration Party, and the senators against him as the Anti-Administration Party.

The United States Senate elections of 1806 and 1807 were elections that had the Democratic-Republican Party increase its overwhelming control of the Senate by one additional Senator. The Federalists went into the elections with such a small share of Senate seats that even if they had won every election, they would still have remained a minority caucus. As it was, however, they lost one of the two seats they were defending and picked up no gains from their opponents.

The United States Senate elections of 1808 and 1809 were elections that had the Federalist Party gain one seat in the United States Senate, and which coincided with the 1808 presidential election. The Federalists had gone into the elections with such a small share of Senate seats that even if they had won every election, they would have still remained a minority caucus.

The United States Senate elections of 1812 and 1813 were elections that, coinciding with President James Madison's re-election, had the Democratic-Republican Party lose two seats but still retain an overwhelming majority in the United States Senate. As in recent elections, the minority Federalists had gone into the elections with such a small share of Senate seats that if they had won every one of the elections, they would still not have controlled a majority.

The United States Senate elections of 1814 and 1815 were elections that had the Democratic-Republican Party lose a seat but still retain an overwhelming majority in the United States Senate. Unlike in recent elections, the minority Federalists had gone into the elections with a chance of regaining their long-lost majority had they swept almost all the seats. However, only one seat switched parties. Two seats held by Democratic-Republicans were left unfilled until long after the next Congress began.

The United States Senate elections of 1816 and 1817 were elections for the United States Senate that had the Democratic-Republican Party gain a net of two seats from the admission of a new state, and which coincided with the presidential election.

The United States Senate elections of 1818 and 1819 were elections for the United States Senate that had the Democratic-Republican Party gain two seats. The Federalists had only three seats being contested, of which they lost two and the third was left vacant due to a failure to elect.

The United States Senate elections of 1802 and 1803 were elections for the United States Senate which had the Democratic-Republican Party assume an overwhelming control thereof.

The United States Senate elections of 1800 and 1801 were elections for the United States Senate that, coinciding with their takeover of the White House, led to the Democratic-Republican Party taking control of the United States Senate. Although the Federalists began the next (7th) Congress with a slim majority, they lost their majority shortly thereafter due to mid-year special elections.

The United States Senate elections of 1796 and 1797 were elections for the United States Senate which, coinciding with John Adams's election as President, had the ruling Federalist Party gain one seat.

United States gubernatorial elections were held in 1810, in 13 states, concurrent with the House and Senate elections.

United States gubernatorial elections were held in 1806, in 10 states, concurrent with the House and Senate elections.

References

  1. Corwin, Emily (February 20, 2020). "Why Has Vermont Never Sent A Woman To Congress?". www.vpr.org. Vermont Public Radio.
  2. Levy, Adam (March 21, 2018). "Vermont on track to be the only state that has never sent a woman to Congress". CNN .
  3. "Vermont 1808 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University . Retrieved February 18, 2018., citing Weekly Wanderer (Randolph, VT). November 7, 1808.
  4. "Vermont 1812 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University . Retrieved February 23, 2018., citing Columbian Phenix: or, Providence Patriot (Providence, RI). October 31, 1812.
  5. "Tuesday, October 25th: Senator" . Vermont Watchman. Montpelier, VT. October 27, 1814. p. 3.
  6. "Election results, Vermont 1820 U.S. Senate". A New Nation Votes: American Election returns 1787-1825. Medford, MA: Tufts University Digital Collections and Archives. Retrieved October 18, 2016.
  7. "U.S. senator: Samuel Prentiss, Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court, has been elected a senator to Congress from the state of Vermont, for a term of six years from the fourth of March next, in the place of the Hon. Dudley Chase, the present senator, who declined a re-election" . Maryland Gazette. Annapolis, MD. November 4, 1830. p. 3.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 Byrd, p. 176.
  9. "Vermont Election of U.S. senator" . New-York Daily Tribune. New York, NY. October 21, 1850. p. 4. The ballot stood as follows: Whole number 220; Necessary to a choice 111; Foot 114, Linsley 61, Shafter 18, Smalley 14, Phelps 7, Follett 3, Royce 2, Daniel Roberts, jr 1
  10. Currie, David P. (May 10, 2005). The Constitution in Congress. ISBN   9780226129006.
  11. "Senator Dillingham Re-elected". The New York Times . October 15, 1902. p. 9.
  12. Byrd, p. 175.
  13. http://www.sanders.senate.gov

Sources