List of counts and dukes of Vendôme

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Counts of Vendome Blason Comtes de Vendome.svg
Counts of Vendôme

Count of Vendôme, and, later, Duke of Vendôme, were French titles of nobility.

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The first known holder of the title was Bouchard Ratepilate. The county passed by marriage to various houses, coming in 1372 to a junior branch of the House of Bourbon. In 1514, Vendôme was made a duchy-peerage. In 1589, the then-Duke of Vendôme came to the throne as Henry IV of France, and the title passed into the royal domain.

House of Bourbon European royal house of French origin

The House of Bourbon is a European royal house of French origin, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. Bourbon kings first ruled France and Navarre in the 16th century. By the 18th century, members of the Spanish Bourbon dynasty held thrones in Spain, Naples, Sicily, and Parma. Spain and Luxembourg currently have monarchs of the House of Bourbon.

Henry IV of France first French monarch of the House of Bourbon

Henry IV, also known by the epithet Good King Henry or Henry the Great, was King of Navarre from 1572 and King of France from 1589 to 1610. He was the first monarch of France from the House of Bourbon, a cadet branch of the Capetian dynasty. He was assassinated in 1610 by François Ravaillac, a fanatical Catholic, and was succeeded by his son Louis XIII.

The crown lands, crown estate, royal domain or domaine royal of France refers to the lands, fiefs and rights directly possessed by the kings of France. While the term eventually came to refer to a territorial unit, the royal domain originally referred to the network of "castles, villages and estates, forests, towns, religious houses and bishoprics, and the rights of justice, tolls and taxes" effectively held by the king or under his domination. In terms of territory, before the reign of Henry IV, the domaine royal did not encompass the entirety of the territory of the kingdom of France and for much of the Middle Ages significant portions of the kingdom were the direct possessions of other feudal lords.

It was re-granted to his illegitimate son César in 1598, and held by his descendants until the extinction of the legitimate male line in 1727.

César, Duke of Vendôme French nobleman

César de Bourbon, Légitimé de France was the illegitimate son of Henry IV of France and his mistress Gabrielle d'Estrées, and founder of the House of Bourbon-Vendome. He held the titles of 1st Duke of Vendôme, 2nd Duke of Beaufort and 2nd Duke of Étampes, but is also simply known as César de Vendôme. Through his daughter, Élisabeth de Bourbon, César was a great-great-great-grandfather of Louis XV of France.

Counts of Vendôme

Bouchardides

Count of Paris

Count of Paris was a title for the local magnate of the district around Paris in Carolingian times. After Hugh Capet was elected King of France in 987, the title merged into the crown and fell into disuse. However, it was later revived by the Orléanist pretenders to the French throne in an attempt to evoke the legacy of Capet and his dynasty.

Renaud of Vendôme was one of the first chancellors of France. He was bishop of Paris from 991 to 1017 as well as count of Vendôme (1005–1017). He was from the Bouchardides family, as a son of Bouchard I the Venerable and of Elisabeth of Melun.

House of Nevers

House of Anjou

House of Nevers

Henry I of France King of the Franks from 1031 to his death

Henry I was King of the Franks from 1031 to 1060, the third from the House of Capet. The royal demesne of France reached its smallest size during his reign, and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians. This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

House of Preuilly

House of Montoire

House of Bourbon

English Counts of Vendôme

Dukes of Vendôme

Arms of the original Bourbon-Vendome branch Blason fr Bourbon-Vendome moderne.svg
Arms of the original Bourbon-Vendôme branch

House of Bourbon

Personal title

Arms of the illegitimate Bourbon-Vendome house Blason Bourbon Vendome.svg
Arms of the illegitimate Bourbon-Vendôme house

The Vendôme name was annexed into the royal domain by Louis XIV of France in 1712, on the pretext that Philip's membership in the Order of Malta as grand prior of France prevented him from holding them, but he retained the title.

Courtesy title

The title was revived by Orleanist claimants to the throne of France as a courtesy title. However it is invalid in French law.[ citation needed ]

Related Research Articles

The Capetian dynasty, also known as the House of France, is a dynasty of Frankish origin, founded by Hugh Capet. It is among the largest and oldest royal houses in Europe and the world, and consists of Hugh Capet's male-line descendants. The senior line ruled in France as the House of Capet from the election of Hugh Capet in 987 until the death of Charles IV in 1328. That line was succeeded by cadet branches, the Houses of Valois and then Bourbon, which ruled until the French Revolution.

Anjou Province

Anjou is a historical province of France straddling the lower Loire River. Its capital was Angers and it was roughly coextensive with the diocese of Angers. It bordered Brittany to the west, Maine to the north, Touraine to the east and Poitou to the south. The adjectival form of Anjou is Angevin, and inhabitants of Anjou are known as Angevins. During the Middle Ages, the County of Anjou, ruled by the Counts of Anjou, was a prominent fief of the French crown.

Vendôme Subprefecture and commune in Centre-Val de Loire, France

Vendôme is a subprefecture of the department of Loir-et-Cher, France. It is also the department's third biggest commune with 16,716 inhabitants (2015).

The Count of Anjou was the ruler of the county of Anjou, first granted by Charles the Bald in the 9th century to Robert the Strong. Ingelger and his son were viscounts of Angers until Ingelger's son Fulk the Red assumed the title of Count of Anjou. The Robertians and their Capetian successors were distracted by wars with the Vikings and other concerns and were unable to recover the county until the reign of Philip II Augustus, more than 270 years later.

Duke of Bourbon

Duke of Bourbon is a title in the peerage of France. It was created in the first half of the 14th century for the eldest son of Robert of France, Count of Clermont and Beatrice of Burgundy, heiress of the lordship of Bourbon. In 1416, with the death of John of Valois, the Dukes of Bourbon were simultaneously Dukes of Auvergne.

Fulk III, Count of Anjou Count of Anjou

Fulk III, the Black was an early Count of Anjou celebrated as one of the first great builders of medieval castles. It is estimated Fulk constructed approximately 100 castles, along with abbeys throughout the Loire Valley in what is now France. He fought successive wars with neighbors in Brittany, Blois, Poitou and Aquitaine and made four pilgrimages to Jerusalem during the course of his life. He had two wives and three children.

Fulk II of Anjou, called le Bon was Count of Anjou from 942 to his death.

Geoffrey I, Count of Anjou count of Anjou from 960 to 987

Geoffrey I of Anjou, known as Grisegonelle, was count of Anjou from 960 to 987.

County of La Marche Place in France

The County of La Marche was a medieval French county, approximately corresponding to the modern département of Creuse.

This is a list of the Counts and Dukes of Étampes, a French fief.

In the 11th and 12th centuries the Countship of Penthièvre in Brittany belonged to a branch of the sovereign House of Brittany. It initially belonged to the House of Rennes. Alan III, Duke of Brittany, gave it to his brother Eudes in 1035, and his descendants formed a cadet branch of the ducal house.

Charles, Duke of Vendôme French noble

Charles de Bourbon was a French prince du sang and military commander at the court of Francis I of France. He is notable as the paternal grandfather of King Henry IV of France.

Geoffrey II, surnamed Jordan, was the lord of Preuilly from 1067 and count of Vendôme from 1085, the son of Geoffrey II of Preuilly and Almodis of Blois.

Fulk of Nevers, known as Foulques l'Oison, was the count of Vendôme from 1028 until his expulsion in 1032 and again from 1056 to his death. He was the second son of Bodon of Nevers and Adela of Anjou.

Jeanne de Ponthieu, dame d'Épernon, Countess of Vendôme and of Castres was a French noblewoman, the youngest daughter of Jean II de Ponthieu, Count of Aumale. She was the wife of Jean VI de Vendôme, Count of Vendôme and of Castres. She acted as regent for her infant granddaughter Jeanne, suo jure Countess of Vendôme from 1371 until the child's premature death in 1372.

The House of Montoire, started with Nihard, Lord of Montoire. Later, through the marriages of Plaisante de Montoire and Helvise Doubleau, the possessions of Mondoubleau and Fréteval Langeais were added. The manor of Mondoubleau and, following the marriage of Pierre II de Montoire and Agnès de Vendôme, the county of Vendôme became part of the House of Montoire.

Castres-en-Albigenses was a dependence of the Viscount of Albi. The Viscounts of Albi granted Castres a city charter establishing a commune with the city, headed by consuls. During the Albigensian Crusade, the city quickly surrendered to Simon de Montfort, who gave it to his brother Guy de Montfort.

The House of Ingelger was the first dynasty in Anjou. It was founded by Ingelger, Viscount of Angers, whose son Fulk the Red made himself count of Anjou. By inheritance, the family came into the possession of the county of Vendôme.

Vendôme, Loir-et-Cher French pronunciation: ​[vɑ̃dom]) is a town in central France. Most other uses of Vendome or Vendôme commemorate the famous French general Louis Joseph de Bourbon, Duke of Vendôme.