List of diplomatic missions in the United States

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Diplomatic relations between world states and the United States

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United States
Countries that have an embassy in the United States
Countries that do not have an embassy in the United States
Disputed territories
Antarctica Diplomatic relations of the United States.svg
Diplomatic relations between world states and the United States
  United States
  Countries that have an embassy in the United States
  Countries that do not have an embassy in the United States
  Disputed territories
  Antarctica

This is a list of diplomatic missions in the United States. At present, 178 nations maintain diplomatic missions to the United States in the capital, Washington, D.C. Eight nations also attribute their missions at the United Nations in New York City as their official embassies to the United States. However, only those offices in New York City that serve as an official diplomatic mission to the United States are listed here. For a complete list of diplomatic missions to the United Nations, see List of current Permanent Representatives to the United Nations.

Contents

Only diplomatic missions operated by a foreign country are listed here. Honorary consulates, typically private offices designated to provide limited services on behalf of a foreign country, are not listed. The United States Department of State maintains the official consular list. [1]

Embassies in Washington, D.C.

The following 177 countries maintain chanceries (embassy buildings) in Washington, D.C. as their primary diplomatic missions to the United States. Entries marked with an asterisk (*) have chanceries located on or near a portion of Massachusetts Avenue known as Embassy Row.

Other missions/delegations to the United States in Washington, D.C.

The following countries or entities have missions in Washington, D.C., though they may not have full diplomatic relations with the United States government.

Missions in New York City

New York City is home to the General Assembly of the United Nations, and all 195 member and observer states send permanent delegations. Nine diplomatic missions in New York City listed below are also formally accredited as each country's official embassy to the United States. There are 118 diplomatic missions in the city. All are consulates-general unless otherwise noted.

Cities with ten or more consulates

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, the second-largest city in the United States, is home to 66 diplomatic missions, more than any other city on the West Coast and any U.S. city except New York and Washington. Many of these consulates are located along Wilshire Boulevard.

Chicago

Chicago, the third largest city in the United States and the largest in the midwestern region of the country, is home to 54 missions, the fourth-most after Washington, D.C., New York and Los Angeles.

Houston

Houston is the fourth largest city in the United States and is home to 42 missions.

San Francisco

San Francisco is home to 42 missions.

Miami

Miami is home to 36 diplomatic missions. Due to its location, many Latin American and Caribbean countries maintain consulates there.

Atlanta

Atlanta is home to 27 missions.

Boston

The Boston area of New England is home to 26 foreign missions.

Other cities with diplomatic missions

Many cities have only one or two consulates; these are often with Mexico (which has 50 offices in the United States), or Canada (which has 17).

Cities with Mexican consulates only (22)

Due to the large number of Mexican immigrants in the United States, Mexico has 50 diplomatic missions in the United States, more than any country has with any other country. Many of these are smaller cities in the southwestern United States, including a number of border towns.

Countries without formal diplomatic missions to the United States

Several countries do not have formal diplomatic missions accredited to the United States. Consular duties for each country, except Kiribati and non-UN members, are instead managed by their respective diplomatic missions to the United Nations in New York.

See also

Related Research Articles

Diplomatic mission Group of people from one state present in another state to represent the sending state

A diplomatic mission or foreign mission is a group of people from one state or an organization present in another state to represent the sending state or organization officially in the receiving state. In practice, the phrase diplomatic mission usually denotes the resident mission, namely the embassy, which is the main office of a country's diplomatic representatives to another country; this is usually, but not necessarily, in the receiving state's capital city. Consulates, on the other hand, are smaller diplomatic missions which are normally located in major cities of the receiving state. As well as being a diplomatic mission to the country in which it is situated, it may also be a non-resident permanent mission to one or more other countries. There are thus resident and non-resident embassies.

Embassy of the United Kingdom, Washington, D.C. Diplomatic mission to the United States

The British Embassy Washington is the British sovereign's diplomatic mission to the United States of America, representing the United Kingdom and the United Kingdom's interests. It is located at 3100 Massachusetts Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.

Embassy of Brazil, Washington, D.C.

The Embassy of Brazil in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Federative Republic of Brazil to the United States of America.

Embassy of France, Washington, D.C.

The Embassy of France in Washington, D.C., is the French diplomatic mission to the United States.

Consul (representative) Diplomatic rank

A consul is an official representative of the government of one state in the territory of another, normally acting to assist and protect the citizens of the consul's own country, and to facilitate trade and friendship between the people of the two countries.

Embassy of Mexico, Washington, D.C.

The Embassy of Mexico in Washington, D.C. houses the diplomatic mission from Mexico to the United States.

Embassy of Portugal, Washington, D.C.

The Portuguese Embassy in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Portuguese Republic to the United States. The building is located at 2012 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, D.C., in the Embassy Row neighborhood.

Embassy of Austria, Washington, D.C.

The Embassy of Austria in Washington, D.C. is the primary diplomatic mission of the Republic of Austria to the United States and represent the interests of Austria and Austrian citizens in the U.S. It is located at 3524 International Court, NW, Washington, D.C., in a neighborhood primarily occupied by diplomatic missions. Its immediate neighbors are the Embassy of Slovakia, the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates, and the Embassy of Egypt. The chancery building houses and operates several services and offices relevant to the pursuit of its mission in the United States; they are listed below.

Embassy of South Korea, Washington, D.C. Diplomatic mission of South Korea to the United States

The Embassy of the Republic of Korea in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of South Korea to the United States. Its main chancery is located at 2450 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C., in the Embassy Row neighborhood. The current ambassador is Lee Soo-hyuck.

Embassy of the United States, Mexico City

The Embassy of the United States of America in Mexico City is the diplomatic mission of United States of America to the United Mexican States. The embassy's chancery is situated on the Paseo de la Reforma, Colonia Cuauhtémoc, Mexico City. Christopher Landau is the current United States Ambassador to Mexico.

References

  1. U.S. Department of State. "Foreign Consular Offices in the United States" . Retrieved 5 March 2010.
  2. McGwin, Kevin (10 January 2014). "Starting from scratch". The Arctic Journal. Archived from the original on 8 July 2014. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  3. "Office of Government Affairs | City of Cleveland". www.city.cleveland.oh.us.
  4. "Government". Consular Office of the Republic of Korea in Dallas. Retrieved 2013-08-30.
  5. https://usa.um.dk/en/about-us/consulate-general-of-denmark---palo-alto/
  6. "Consulate-General of Japan in Portland". www.portland.us.emb-japan.go.jp.
  7. Associated Press (April 27, 2019). "New Ethiopian consulate in St. Paul seeks to build trust". Minnesota Public Radio.
  8. "Embajadas y Consulados de El Salvador - Consulado General de El Salvador en Silver Spring, Maryland". embajadasyconsulados.rree.gob.sv.
  9. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-04-01. Retrieved 2017-04-01.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. "Government". Embassy of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Archived from the original on 2015-03-30. Retrieved 2012-07-05.