List of houses and associated buildings by John Douglas

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John Douglas in late middle age John Douglas (architect).jpg
John Douglas in late middle age

John Douglas (1830–1911) was an English architect based in Chester, Cheshire. His designs included new churches, alterations to and restoration of existing churches, church furnishings, new houses and alterations to existing houses, and a variety of other buildings, including shops, banks, offices, schools, memorials and public buildings. [1] His architectural styles were eclectic, but as he worked during the period of the Gothic Revival, much of his work incorporates elements of the English Gothic style. [2] Douglas is probably best remembered for his incorporation of vernacular elements in his buildings, especially half-timbering. [3] Of particular importance is Douglas' use of joinery and highly detailed wood carving. [4]

Contents

Douglas was born in the Cheshire village of Sandiway and was articled to the Lancaster architect E. G. Paley, later becoming his chief assistant. He established an office in Chester in either 1855 or 1860, from where he practised throughout his career. [1] [5] Initially he ran the office himself but in 1884 he appointed his assistant, Daniel Porter Fordham, as a partner. When Fordham retired in 1897, he was succeeded by Charles Howard Minshull. In 1909 this partnership was dissolved and Douglas ran the office alone until his death in 1911. [6] As his office was in Chester, most of his work on houses was in Cheshire and North Wales, although some was further afield, in Lancashire, Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Warwickshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Derbyshire, Surrey, and Scotland. [7]

From an early stage in his career, Douglas attracted commissions from wealthy and powerful patrons, the first of which came from Hugh Cholmondeley, 2nd Baron Delamere. His most important patrons were the Grosvenor family of Eaton Hall, namely Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster, Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, and Hugh Grosvenor, 2nd Duke of Westminster. Douglas designed a large number and variety of buildings in the family's Eaton Hall estate and the surrounding villages. Other important patrons were William Molyneux, 4th Earl of Sefton, Rowland Egerton-Warburton of Arley Hall, George Cholmondeley, 5th Marquess of Cholmondeley, and Francis Egerton, 3rd Earl of Ellesmere. Later in his career Douglas carried out commissions for W. E. Gladstone and his family, and for W. H. Lever. [7]

Douglas' new houses embrace a range of sizes and types, and include substantial country houses, such as Oakmere Hall and Abbeystead House; cottages, such as the pair known as Tai Cochion; workers' houses, such as those in Port Sunlight; and terraces of houses built for speculation, including 6–11 Grosvenor Park Road and 1–11 and 13 Bath Street in Chester. Work carried out on grand houses included additions to Vale Royal Abbey and Hawarden Castle. Works associated with houses include entrance gates for Mostyn Hall and a set of kennels at Croxteth Hall. Many of Douglas' new houses have been designated as listed buildings. Listed buildings are divided into three grades according to their importance. [8] This list consists of work carried out by Douglas in designing new houses, additions and modifications to pre-existing houses, and structures related to houses such as kennels and gates. The details have been taken mainly from the Catalogue of Works in the biography by Edward Hubbard. [7] Not all structures in these categories are included. If a building is listed, it has been included. Some unlisted buildings have been included because they are of interest, or they demonstrate that Douglas worked in areas at a distance away from his office in Chester. The works excluded are, on the whole, small houses, cottages and outbuildings. Works attributed to Douglas by Hubbard on stylistic grounds together with evidence of a local association, even though they are not confirmed by other reliable evidence, are included. [9] Where this is the case, it is stated in the Notes column. Unexecuted schemes are not included.

Key

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Grade
(England and Wales)
Criteria [10]
Grade IBuildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important.
Grade II*Particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
Grade IIBuildings of national importance and special interest.
Category
(Scotland)
Criteria [11]
Category BBuildings of special architectural or historic interest which are major examples of a particular period, style or building type.
"—" denotes a work that is not graded.

Houses and associated buildings

NameLocationDateNotesGrade
Vale Royal Abbey Whitegate, Cheshire
53°13′29″N2°32′33″W / 53.2247°N 2.5426°W / 53.2247; -2.5426 (Vale Royal Abbey)
1. 1860
2. 1861
3. 1877
Alterations were made to the house for the 2nd Baron Delamere; in 1860 the centre of the south range which had previously been timber-framed was encased in brick, the following year Douglas added the southwest wing, and in 1877 the library was remodelled. [12] [13] II* [14]
Kennels at Croxteth Hall Croxteth, Liverpool, Merseyside
53°26′23″N2°52′34″W / 53.4397°N 2.8762°W / 53.4397; -2.8762 (Kennels, Croxteth Hall)
c.1861–70Douglas designed kennels in the grounds of Croxteth Hall in High Victorian style for William Molyneux, 4th Earl of Sefton. [15] [16] II [17]
Grosvenor Park Lodge Grosvenor Park, Chester, Cheshire
53°11′27″N2°52′55″W / 53.1909°N 2.8819°W / 53.1909; -2.8819 (Grosvenor Park Lodge)
1865–67Built for the 2nd Marquess of Westminster, this is Douglas' first recorded commission for the Grosvenor family. It is also his first known use of black-and-white timber framing. [18] [19] II [20]
Burford Lane Farmhouse Oughtrington, Cheshire
53°22′36″N2°26′43″W / 53.3767°N 2.4453°W / 53.3767; -2.4453 (Burford Lane Farmhouse)
1866The farmhouse was built for George C. Dewhurst; the lower two storeys are in brick and the attics are timber-framed. [21] [22] II [23]
Oakmere Hall Sandiway, Cheshire
53°13′47″N2°36′53″W / 53.2296°N 2.6148°W / 53.2296; -2.6148 (Oakmere Hall)
1867This was Douglas' largest commission to date; the house was built for John and Thomas Johnson of Runcorn, in Gothic style with a tower, a porte cochère, circular turrets, steep roofs, and hipped and gabled dormers. [24] [25] [26] II [27]
Dene Cottages Great Budworth, Cheshire
53°17′35″N2°30′35″W / 53.2931°N 2.5096°W / 53.2931; -2.5096 (Dene Cottages)
186768This pair of cottages was built for Rowland Egerton-Warburton of Arley Hall. The cottages have a brick lower storey and a timber-framed upper storey; the plasterwork is pargetted. [21] II [28]
Soughton Hall Sychdyn, Flintshire
53°11′52″N3°07′36″W / 53.1979°N 3.1268°W / 53.1979; -3.1268 (Soughton Hall)
186769Reconstruction for John Scott Bankes; the 18th century house, which had been remodelled in the 1820s by Charles Barry, was encased in brick, the façade was reconstructed, a porch added to the south front and, in 1872, a game larder was built. [29] [30] II* [31]
31 and 33 Dee Banks Chester, Cheshire
53°11′09″N2°52′07″W / 53.1858°N 2.8687°W / 53.1858; -2.8687 (31 & 33 Dee Banks, Chester)
1869Douglas built the houses for himself and lived in No. 33; No. 31 was probably planned as an investment. Their style is Gothic Revival—they are built in brick with polychromic diapering. [32] [33] II [34]
Church Cottage Eccleston, Cheshire
53°09′27″N2°52′44″W / 53.1574°N 2.8788°W / 53.1574; -2.8788 (Church Cottage, Eccleston)
1870The cottage was built in brick with timber-framed and tile-hung gables for the 1st Duke of Westminster. [35] [36] II [37]
54–57 High Street Great Budworth, Cheshire
53°17′37″N2°30′22″W / 53.2935°N 2.5060°W / 53.2935; -2.5060 (54-57 High Street, Great Budworth)
c.1870This row of four cottages, was refaced and partly re-built for Rowland Egerton-Warburton. [38] II [39]
Polesworth Vicarage Polesworth, Warwickshire
52°37′07″N1°36′46″W / 52.6187°N 1.6127°W / 52.6187; -1.6127 (Polesworth Vicarage)
c.1870The vicarage incorporated earlier parts of a building on the site of an abbess' lodging. It has an irregular E-plan, and is built in brick and timber framing. [40] II [41]
Goldmine House 26 Southbank, Great Budworth, Cheshire
53°17′35″N2°30′16″W / 53.2931°N 2.5044°W / 53.2931; -2.5044 (The Homestead, Sandiway)
c.1870This is a substantial house of irregular plan in brown brick with some timber framing built for Rowland Egerton-Warburton. [42] II [43]
Plas Tan-y-Bwlch Maentwrog, Gwynedd, Wales
52°56′46″N4°00′09″W / 52.9462°N 4.0024°W / 52.9462; -4.0024 (Plas Tan-y-Bwlch, Maentwrog)
1872Additions were made to the house for W. E. Oakley. [44] II* [45]
The Limes Farmhouse Pulford, Cheshire
53°07′55″N2°55′52″W / 53.1320°N 2.9310°W / 53.1320; -2.9310 (The Limes, Pulford)
1872This house is in three bays with two storeys and large dormers; there is much brick detailing and a pargetted gable. It was built for the 1st Duke of Westminster and is now known as Green Paddocks. [46] [47] II [48]
Shotwick House Great Saughall, Cheshire
53°13′32″N2°57′47″W / 53.2256°N 2.9631°W / 53.2256; -2.9631 (Shotwick Park)
1. 1872
2. 1907
Originally named Shotwick Park, this is a large brick house with turrets and steeply hipped roofs built for H. D. Trelawny. After a fire in 1907 it was enlarged and rebuilt for Thorneycroft Vernon. [49] [50] II [51]
Broxton Higher Hall Broxton, Cheshire
53°04′27″N2°46′02″W / 53.0743°N 2.7671°W / 53.0743; -2.7671 (Broxton Old Hall)
c.1873Douglas carried out a reconstruction of an earlier building, with much use of half-timbering, for Sir Philip de M. Grey Egerton. [52] [53] II [54]
Ruloe House Near Norley, Cheshire
53°15′04″N2°37′35″W / 53.2512°N 2.6263°W / 53.2512; -2.6263 (Ruloe House)
c.1873The house was built for the Wilbraham estate. It is in red brick with red tiled roofs, and has a circular turret with a conical roof. [55] II [56]
Hill Bark Farmhouse Frankby, Merseyside
53°21′52″N3°07′51″W / 53.3645°N 3.1307°W / 53.3645; -3.1307 (Hill Bark Farmhouse)
1875The farmhouse was part of a model farm for Septimus Ledward; it was built in stone with a half-timbered upper storey. [57] [58] Outbuildings for the farm were also designed by Douglas. [59] II [60]
Cilcain Hall Cilcain, Flintshire, Wales
53°12′20″N3°13′13″W / 53.2055°N 3.2203°W / 53.2055; -3.2203 (Cilcain Hall)
187577The hall was built in stone with a red-tiled roof for the railway engineer, W. B. Buddicom. [57] [61]
The Gelli Tallarn Green, Wrexham, Wales
52°59′20″N2°47′59″W / 52.9889°N 2.7998°W / 52.9889; -2.7998 (The Gelli, Tallarn Green)
1877This house was built in three ranges at right angles to each other in brick with some stone and half-timbering for Hons. Georgina and Henrietta Kenyon. It includes a tower with a pyramidal roof and a turret incorporating a dovecote. [62] [63] II* [64]
Tai Cochion Nannerch, Flintshire, Wales
52°12′58″N2°15′00″W / 52.2162°N 2.2501°W / 52.2162; -2.2501 (Tai Cochion, Nannerch)
1877–78This was a pair of cottages built on the village street for the railway engineer, W. B. Buddicom. [62] [65] II [66] [67]
Aldford Lodge Aldford, Cheshire
53°07′44″N2°51′58″W / 53.1289°N 2.8661°W / 53.1289; -2.8661 (Aldford Lodge)
1877–;79Aldford Lodge was originally a pair of cottages built in brick with pargetted gable heads for the 1st Duke of Westminster. [68] II [69]
Upper Belgrave Lodge Eaton Hall, Cheshire
53°08′29″N2°53′21″W / 53.1415°N 2.8893°W / 53.1415; -2.8893 (Upper Belgrave Lodge)
1877–79The lodge was built for the 1st Duke of Westminster. It is T-shaped with the lower storey in brick with sandstone blocks, and the upper jettied and timber-framed. [62] II [70]
Eaton Boat Eaton, Cheshire
53°09′11″N2°52′43″W / 53.1531°N 2.8785°W / 53.1531; -2.8785 (Eaton Boat)
c.1877Formerly called Gas Works Cottages, these were built in stone with half-timbered gables for the 1st Duke of Westminster. The roof is patterned with red and blue tiles. [71] II [72]
Whitegate vicarage Whitegate, Cheshire
53°13′07″N2°33′29″W / 53.2186°N 2.5581°W / 53.2186; -2.5581 (Whitegate vicarage)
1878This was built in brick with a partly jettied upper storey for the 2nd Baron Delamere as the vicarage for St Mary's Church. [73] [74]
Llanerch Panna Penley, Wrexham, Wales
52°56′52″N2°52′40″W / 52.9478°N 2.8778°W / 52.9478; -2.8778 (Llanerch Panna)
1878–79Llanerch Panna was a house for Hon. George T. Kenyon. It is entirely half-timbered on a Ruabon brick plinth, with brick chimneys and a red-tiled roof. The house is now named Tudor Court. [75] [76]
Model Cottage Sandiway, Cheshire
53°13′54″N2°35′26″W / 53.2318°N 2.5905°W / 53.2318; -2.5905 (Model Cottage, Sandiway)
c.1879This was built by Douglas on his own land, in brick with a Welsh slate roof. [77] II [78]
6–11 Grosvenor Park Road Chester, Cheshire
53°11′29″N2°52′54″W / 53.1914°N 2.8817°W / 53.1914; -2.8817 (6-11 Grosvenor Park Road, Chester)
c.1879–80This terrace of six houses was built by Douglas on his own land on the approach to Grosvenor Park. They are in red brick with terracotta dressings and are flanked by turrets. [79] [80] II* [81]
St Oswald's Vicarage Parkgate Road, Chester, Cheshire
53°11′53″N2°53′45″W / 53.1980°N 2.8958°W / 53.1980; -2.8958 (St Oswald's Vicarage)
1880The vicarage was built in brick with Westmorland green slate roofs with an attached parish room. It now houses the English Department of the University of Chester. [82] [83] II [84]
Bent Farmhouse Warburton, Greater Manchester
53°23′55″N2°26′47″W / 53.3985°N 2.4465°W / 53.3985; -2.4465 (Bent Farmhouse, Warburton)
1880This is a timber-framed building which was heavily restored by Douglas for Rowland Egerton-Warburton. [85] [86] II [87]
Police HouseEaton Road, Eccleston, Cheshire
53°09′24″N2°52′51″W / 53.1567°N 2.8807°W / 53.1567; -2.8807 (Police House, Eccleston)
c.1880This house was built for the 1st Duke of Westminster and is attributed to Douglas. [42] [88] II [88]
Eccleston Hill Lodge Eaton Hall, Cheshire
53°09′13″N2°53′07″W / 53.1537°N 2.8852°W / 53.1537; -2.8852 (Eccleston Hill Lodge)
1881The lodge was built for the 1st Duke of Westminster. It consists of a three-storey gatehouse with turrets and a hipped roof which is so high that it is virtually a spire. [89] [90] II* [91]
Rowden Abbey Bromyard, Herefordshire
52°12′14″N2°32′28″W / 52.2038°N 2.5411°W / 52.2038; -2.5411 (Rowden Abbey)
1881Rowden Abbey is an entirely black-and-white house with heavy ornamentation which was built for H. J. Bailey. [92]
West Lodge Abberley, Worcestershire
52°18′12″N2°22′59″W / 52.3034°N 2.3830°W / 52.3034; -2.3830 (West Lodge, Abberley)
1881This building for John Joseph Jones of Abberley Hall is attributed to Douglas. [77] II
Aldford Hall Farmhouse Aldford, Cheshire
53°07′02″N2°52′16″W / 53.1172°N 2.8710°W / 53.1172; -2.8710 (Aldford Hall Farmhouse)
1881–82The lower storey of the house, built for the 1st Duke of Westminster, is in stone, the upper in brick, and it has a Dutch gable. [93] [94] II [95]
Eccleston Hill Eccleston, Cheshire
53°09′17″N2°53′04″W / 53.1547°N 2.8845°W / 53.1547; -2.8845 (Eccleston Hill)
1. 1881–82
2. 1892–94
The original building consisted of a house, stables and a cottage constructed as a residence for the secretary of the 1st Duke of Westminster. Alterations and additions were made to it in the 1890s. [36] [96] II [97]
Barrowmore Hall (Barrow Court) Great Barrow, Cheshire c.1881This was one of Douglas' largest country houses, built for the grain merchant, Hugh Lyle Smyth. It has been demolished. [98]
The Paddocks Eccleston, Cheshire
53°09′19″N2°52′52″W / 53.1553°N 2.8811°W / 53.1553; -2.8811 (The Paddocks, Eccleston)
1882–83The Paddocks (or Eccleston Paddocks) was built for Cecil Parker, the land agent of the 1st Duke of Westminster; its service wing was demolished in 1960. The house has a sandstone lower storey with brick above, two circular turrets, steep hipped roofs and a massive chimney. [36] [99] II* [100]
Wigfair Hall Cefn Meiriadog, Denbighshire, Wales
53°13′45″N3°27′28″W / 53.2292°N 3.4578°W / 53.2292; -3.4578 (Wigfair, Cefn Meiriadog)
1882–84This was the re-building of an earlier house on the site for Rev. R. H. Howard. It is in Jacobethan style, built in red brick with stone dressings; it has an L-plan with a pyramid-roofed tower. [101] [102] II* [103]
Plas Mynach Barmouth, Gwynedd, Wales
52°43′45″N4°03′46″W / 52.7292°N 4.0627°W / 52.7292; -4.0627 (Plas Mynach, Barmouth)
1883Plas Mynach stands in a prominent isolated position and has much internal, detailed woodwork; it was built for W. H. Jones. [104] II* [105]
Cornist Hall Flint, Flintshire, Wales
53°14′29″N3°09′50″W / 53.2415°N 3.1638°W / 53.2415; -3.1638 (Cornist Hall, Flint)
1884Work on rebuilding the hall was commissioned by Richard Muspratt but ceased on his death and was not completed. It is now used as a venue for weddings and for dining. [106] [107] [108]
Jodrell Hall Twemlow, Cheshire
53°13′39″N2°18′26″W / 53.2276°N 2.3072°W / 53.2276; -2.3072 (Jodrell Hall)
1885The hall was built in Georgian style in 1779. Douglas added a south wing and a porch. It is now used as Terra Nova School. [109] [110] II [111]
Abbeystead House Abbeystead, Lancashire
53°59′05″N2°39′41″W / 53.9848°N 2.6615°W / 53.9848; -2.6615 (Abbeystead House)
1. 188587
2. 1891–92
3. 1894
Abbeystead House was built in Elizabethan style with two lodges for the William Molyneux, 4th Earl of Sefton. In the 1890s stables, a pair of cottages, and gun and billiard rooms were added. [112] [113] II [114]
Halkyn Castle Halkyn, Flintshire, Wales
53°13′45″N3°11′09″W / 53.2293°N 3.1857°W / 53.2293; -3.1857 (Halkyn Castle)
1886An additional wing was added in Elizabethan style, and internal alterations including a staircase and a chimneypiece, were made for the 1st Duke of Westminster. [115] [116] II* [117]
Danefield House Largs, North Ayrshire, Scotlandc.1886This is the only recorded house designed by Douglas in Scotland; it was built for W. G. Crum. [118] B [119]
Coetmor Ruthin, Denbighshire, Wales
53°06′59″N3°18′19″W / 53.1164°N 3.3053°W / 53.1164; -3.3053 (Coetmor)
c.1886Coetmor was a house for Col. Cornwallis West. It forms a pair with Dedwyddfa. [118] [120] II [121]
Dedwyddfa Ruthin, Denbighshire, Wales
53°06′59″N3°18′19″W / 53.1164°N 3.3053°W / 53.1164; -3.3053 (Dedwyddfa)
c.1886This house has been attributed to Douglas. It forms a pair with Coetmor. [118] [120] II [122]
Eccleston Ferry House Eccleston, Cheshire
53°09′12″N2°52′28″W / 53.1533°N 2.8745°W / 53.1533; -2.8745 (Eccleston Ferry House)
1887–88The house is situated near an ancient crossing place of the River Dee. It has an L-shaped plan, and was built in red brick with some timber framing for the 1st Duke of Westminster. [36] [123] II [124]
Hawarden Castle Hawarden, Flintshire, Wales
53°11′00″N3°01′05″W / 53.1834°N 3.0180°W / 53.1834; -3.0180 (Hawarden Castle)
1. 1887–88
2. 1889
Additions were made to the house for W. E. Gladstone. An octagonal strongroom for storing papers was built, followed by a porch to celebrate the Gladstones' golden wedding. [125] [126] II [127]
Parker's Buildings 115 Foregate Street, Chester, Cheshire
53°11′33″N2°53′03″W / 53.1924°N 2.8841°W / 53.1924; -2.8841 (Parker's Buildings, Chester)
1888–89This was a block of 30  flats built for the 1st Duke of Westminster and named after his nephew and land agent, Cecil Parker. The flats were to provide accommodation for retired workers from the Duke's estate at Eaton Hall. [80] [128] II [129]
Gloddaeth Hall Llandudno, Conwy, Wales
53°18′34″N3°47′56″W / 53.3095°N 3.7990°W / 53.3095; -3.7990 (Gloddaeth Hall)
1889Douglas added a west wing to the hall for Lady Augusta Mostyn. It is now part of St David's College. [130] I [131]
Belgrave Lodge Eaton Hall, Cheshire
53°08′37″N2°55′06″W / 53.1437°N 2.9183°W / 53.1437; -2.9183 (Belgrave Lodge)
1889–90The lodge was built in red brick with stone dressings for the 1st Duke of Westminster. The chimneys have barley-sugar brickwork. [132] [133] II [134]
Green Farmhouse Poulton, Cheshire
53°07′28″N2°54′15″W / 53.1245°N 2.9043°W / 53.1245; -2.9043 (Green Farm, Poulton)
1889–90Extensions were made to the rear of this house, which dates from the 18th century, for the 1st Duke of Westminster. [133] II [135]
Abbotsford Cuddington, Cheshire
53°14′36″N2°35′52″W / 53.2432°N 2.5978°W / 53.2432; -2.5978 (Abbotsford)
1890Abbotsford was a house built in red brick with Lakeland slate roofs for Jabez S. Thompson. [136] II [137]
Glangwna Caernarfon, Wales
53°08′05″N4°14′28″W / 53.1346°N 4.2411°W / 53.1346; -4.2411 (Glangwna)
1892–93This was the largest of Douglas' houses in which half-timbering was used on an extensive scale; it is entirely black-and-white above the ground storey. The house was built for J. E. Greaves. [138]
Houses and cottages Port Sunlight, Merseyside
53°21′18″N2°59′49″W / 53.355°N 2.997°W / 53.355; -2.997 (Port Sunlight)
1892–99Douglas was one of the architects who designed a number of domestic buildings in a variety of styles in the model village of Port Sunlight for the Lever Brothers. [139] [140] II [141]
Brocksford Hall Doveridge, Derbyshire
52°53′55″N1°48′26″W / 52.8986°N 1.8073°W / 52.8986; -1.8073 (Brocksford Hall)
1893Brocksford Hall was a major country house in Jacobethan style designed for C. W. Jervis Smith. It was the last house designed by Douglas on such a great scale. It was later used as an independent school and has now been converted into apartments. [142] [143] [144] [145] II [143]
Llety'r Dryw Abergele Road,
Colwyn Bay, Conwy, Wales
53°17′24″N3°42′38″W / 53.2899°N 3.7106°W / 53.2899; -3.7106 (Llety'r Dryw)
1893This consists of a new house built for John Eden, and the re-modelling of earlier building to form stables. The house is a simple stone-built villa with gabled cross wings. It is now owned by the North Wales Police Authority. [146] [147] II [148]
Wardley Hall Worsley, Greater Manchester
53°30′57″N2°22′01″W / 53.5158°N 2.3669°W / 53.5158; -2.3669 (Wardley Hall)
1894Douglas carried out an extensive restoration of a house dating from about 1500 for Francis Egerton, 3rd Earl of Ellesmere. [149] [150] I [151]
Home Place Oxted, Surrey 1894Home Place was a medium-sized house. [152]
Iron Bridge Lodge Aldford, Cheshire
53°08′05″N2°52′18″W / 53.1347°N 2.8717°W / 53.1347; -2.8717 (Iron Bridge Lodge, Aldford)
189495The lodge was built for the 1st Duke of Westminster. Its lower storey is of brick on a sandstone plinth and the upper storey is jettied and half-timbered. [153] II [154]
Two lodges Worsley, Greater Manchester
53°30′14″N2°23′11″W / 53.5038°N 2.3864°W / 53.5038; -2.3864 (West Lodge, Worsley Old Hall)
1. 1894–96
2. 1896
Douglas designed two lodges for Worsley Old Hall for the 3rd Earl of Ellesmere, one in Walkden Road and the other off Greenleach Lane. [155] [156]
West LodgeLeigh Road, Worsley, Greater Manchester
53°30′11″N2°23′42″W / 53.5031°N 2.3950°W / 53.5031; -2.3950 (West Lodge, Worsley New Hall)
189496West Lodge was a two-storey timber-framed house for Worsley New Hall designed for the 3rd Earl of Ellesmere. [156] [157]
Saighton Grange Saighton, Cheshire
53°09′02″N2°50′03″W / 53.1505°N 2.8341°W / 53.1505; -2.8341 (Saighton Grange)
1894–96Alterations and additions were made to the house and stables were added for the 1st Duke of Westminster. It is now used by Abbey Gate College. [157] [158] II [159]
Walmoor Hill Dee Banks, Chester, Cheshire
53°11′14″N2°52′07″W / 53.1872°N 2.8687°W / 53.1872; -2.8687 (Walmoor Hill, Chester)
1896Walmoor Hill is a sandstone house that Douglas built for himself. It has a T-shaped plan and is in Elizabethan style. Since Douglas' death it has been used as a girls' school and as the County Fire Headquarters. [33] [160] II* [161]
Entrance Gates Mostyn Hall, Mostyn, Flintshire, Wales
53°18′57″N3°16′44″W / 53.315828°N 3.278984°W / 53.315828; -3.278984 (Mostyn Hall Gates)
1896The gates have stone piers, and the ironwork, executed by James Swindley, is in early 18th-century Baroque style. [162] [163] [164] II [165]
Thornton Manor Thornton Hough, Merseyside
53°19′39″N3°03′07″W / 53.3276°N 3.0519°W / 53.3276; -3.0519 (Thornton Manor)
c.1896The pre-existing house was extended for W. H. Lever with a block in Elizabethan style. Most of this was demolished and replaced in 1913; two gables and bay windows remain. [166] [167] II [168]
Hen Llys Manafon, Powys, Wales
52°37′07″N3°18′09″W / 52.6185°N 3.3024°W / 52.6185; -3.3024 (Hen Llys)
1898This house was built for Mrs Perris-Williams. It is a stone house with a slate roof in two storeys plus a cellar. An extension was added in the 20th century. [169] [170] II [171]
Colshaw Hall Peover Superior, Cheshire
53°15′57″N2°19′40″W / 53.2658°N 2.3278°W / 53.2658; -2.3278 (Colshaw Hall)
1903This is a house in red brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys plus an attic. [172] II [173]
1–11 and 13 Bath Street Chester, Cheshire
53°11′29″N2°52′58″W / 53.1915°N 2.8828°W / 53.1915; -2.8828 (Bath Street, Chester)
1903This is a row of attached cottages and one separate house which were built on Douglas' own land. They are built in sandstone and have an irregular frontage; this includes gables jettied on corbels, dormers, bay windows, and three round turrets. [174] [175] II [176] [177]
The Homestead Weaverham Road, Sandiway, Cheshire
53°14′08″N2°35′35″W / 53.2355°N 2.5931°W / 53.2355; -2.5931 (The Homestead, Sandiway)
190607Douglas sold the land to B. J. Sanby and the large house built on the site is attributed to him. Its name was changed to Redwalls and was used as a children's home. [178] In 2010 it is being used as a nursing home. [179] II [180]
Vale Royal Abbey showing the southwest wing added in 1861 Vale-Royal-Abbey-Douglas.jpg
Vale Royal Abbey showing the southwest wing added in 1861
Grosvenor Park Lodge, south face Grosvenor Park Lodge.jpg
Grosvenor Park Lodge, south face
Oakmere Hall south (garden) front Oakmere Hall 7a.jpg
Oakmere Hall south (garden) front
Soughton Hall Soughton Hall (geograph 2404502).jpg
Soughton Hall
Polesworth Vicarage Polesworth Vicarage.jpg
Polesworth Vicarage
Plas Tan-y-Bwlch Plas Tan-y-Bwlch.jpg
Plas Tan-y-Bwlch
Shotwick Park in 1897 Shotwick Park.jpg
Shotwick Park in 1897
Broxton Higher Hall Broxton Old Hall.jpg
Broxton Higher Hall
The Gelli c. 1880 Tallarn Green, The Gelli.jpg
The Gelli c. 1880
Llannerch Panna in 1879 Llannerch Panna.jpg
Llannerch Panna in 1879
Grosvenor Park Road, Chester Grosvenor Park Road.jpg
Grosvenor Park Road, Chester
Drawing of Eccleston Hill Lodge in 1883 Eccleston Hill Lodge.jpg
Drawing of Eccleston Hill Lodge in 1883
Architect's drawing of Rowden Abbey in 1881 Rowden Abbey.jpg
Architect's drawing of Rowden Abbey in 1881
Barrowmore Hall in 1881 Barrowmore Hall.jpg
Barrowmore Hall in 1881
The Paddocks, Eccleston in 1883 Eccleston, The Paddocks.jpg
The Paddocks, Eccleston in 1883
Wigfair Hall Wigfair.jpg
Wigfair Hall
Interior of Plas Mynach in 1884 Barmouth, Plas Mynach.jpg
Interior of Plas Mynach in 1884
Bronwylfa in 1884 Bronwylfa.jpg
Bronwylfa in 1884
Abbeystead House Abbeystead House.jpg
Abbeystead House
Hawarden Castle Hawarden Castle.jpeg
Hawarden Castle
South front of Parker's Buildings, Chester Parker's Buildings 4.jpg
South front of Parker's Buildings, Chester
3-9 Bridge Street, one of the terraces of cottages in Port Sunlight designed by Douglas Houses on Greendale Avenue, Port Sunlight.jpg
39 Bridge Street, one of the terraces of cottages in Port Sunlight designed by Douglas
Brocksford Hall in 1893 Brocksford Hall.jpg
Brocksford Hall in 1893
Wardley Hall Wardley Hall2.jpg
Wardley Hall
Iron Bridge Lodge, Aldford Aldford Lodge.jpg
Iron Bridge Lodge, Aldford
Walmoor Hill Walmoor Hill 1.jpg
Walmoor Hill
Thornton Manor Thornton Manor.jpeg
Thornton Manor
Architects' drawing of Colshaw Hall Colshaw Hall.jpg
Architects' drawing of Colshaw Hall
Bath Street, Chester Bath Street 1.jpg
Bath Street, Chester
Aldford Lodge Aldford Lodge-2.jpg
Aldford Lodge
Danefield House, Largs Danefield House (geograph 5251339).jpg
Danefield House, Largs

See also

Related Research Articles

Joseph Turner was an architect of Welsh origin who worked in the 18th century. Most of his major works were in North Wales, and in Chester, Cheshire. Almost all of them were in Georgian style, with at least one work in Gothic style, in Mold, Flintshire, Wales. Turner also designed memorials in Chester Cathedral, and in the churches of St Peter, Prestbury, St Margaret, Wrenbury, St Peter, Ruthin, and St Collen, Llangollen. Turner was a member of Chester Assembly.

Eccleston is a former civil parish, now in the parishes of Eaton and Eccleston and Dodleston, in Cheshire West and Chester, England. It contains 46 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. One of these is listed at Grade I, the highest grade, four at the middle grade, Grade II*, and the rest at the lowest grade, Grade II. The parish is contained within the estate of Eaton Hall, and many of the listed buildings were built for members of the Grosvenor family, in particular the 1st Duke of Westminster, who provided many commissions for the Chester architect John Douglas.

Poulton is a former civil parish, now in the parish of Poulton and Pulford, in Cheshire West and Chester, England. It contains seven listed buildings, all of which are designated by English Heritage at Grade II, and included in the National Heritage List for England. This grade is the lowest of the three gradings given to listed buildings and is applied to "buildings of national importance and special interest". The parish is entirely rural, and forms part of the estate of the Dukes of Westminster. The listed buildings are all domestic, consisting of houses and a lodge.

There are over 20,000 Grade II* listed buildings in England. This page is a list of these buildings in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester.

There are over 9,000 Grade I listed buildings in England. This page is a list of these buildings in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester.

Saighton is a former civil parish, now in the parish of Aldford and Saighton, in Cheshire West and Chester, England. It contains 15 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest grade, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II. Apart from the village of Saighton, the parish is rural, and includes the gateway of one of the monastic granges of St Werburgh's Abbey, Chester; this, with addition of later buildings, has been converted into a private college. The college buildings are listed, together with the primary school, the parish church, houses and adjoining walls, a farmhouse and farm buildings, a water tower, and a telephone kiosk.

Listed buildings in Saughall

Saughall is a former civil parish now in the parishes of Saughall and Shotwick Park, Puddington and the unparished area of Chester, in Cheshire West and Chester, England. It contains eleven buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings, all of which are listed at Grade II. This grade is the lowest of the three gradings given to listed buildings and is applied to "buildings of national importance and special interest". The parish contains the village of Saughall, and is otherwise rural. Most of the listed buildings are houses and associated structures. The others include a former inn, a former windmill, a church, and two guideposts.

Chester is a city in Cheshire, England. It contains over 650 structures that are designated as listed buildings by English Heritage and included in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, over 500 are listed at Grade II, the lowest of the three gradings given to listed buildings and applied to "buildings of national importance and special interest". This list contains the Grade II listed buildings in the unparished area of the city to the east of the Chester city walls and to the south of the Shropshire Union Canal.

Bebington is a town in Wirral, Merseyside, England. It contains seven buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The listed buildings consist of two churches, two houses, a sundial, and a former public house.

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Sources

Commons-logo.svg Media related to John Douglas (architect) at Wikimedia Commons