List of ice hockey teams in Saskatchewan

Last updated

The province of Saskatchewan is home to five Western Hockey League teams, twelve Junior A teams – eleven in the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League and one in the Alberta Junior Hockey League – and one Junior B league comprising thirteen teams. The province is also home to two universities teams playing in the Canada West Universities Athletic Association and one college team that plays in the Alberta Colleges Athletics Conference.

Contents

The first professional ice hockey teams in Saskatchewan were the Regina Capitals and the Saskatoon Sheiks who first played in the Western Canada Hockey League's (WCHL) inaugural season in 1921–22. After the collapse of the WCHL following the 1925–26 season, these teams and the Moose Jaw Maroons joined the Prairie Hockey League (PHL). The PHL folded after two season, which resulted in the end of professional hockey in Saskatchewan. In 1952 professional hockey returned to Saskatchewan when the Saskatoon Quakers joined the minor-pro Western Hockey League (WHL). The Quakers folded in 1956 and were replaced by the Saskatoon/St. Paul Regals who split their home games between Saskatoon and St. Paul, Minnesota for the 1957–58 season. The following season, the Regals became the second incarnation of the Saskatoon Quakers, abandoning St. Paul, but folded after just one season, leaving the province without professional hockey once again. Since then, there have been a number of attempts to return professional hockey to Saskatchewan. In 1983, a bid to buy and relocate the National Hockey League's St. Louis Blues to Saskatoon was vetoed by the NHL, who preferred to find an owner to keep the team in St. Louis. [1] In 2009, Ice Edge attempted to purchase the bankrupt Phoenix Coyotes with a plan to keep the team in Phoenix, but to also play five home games a year in Saskatoon. [2] However, The Conference Board of Canada has reported that Saskatoon's population of approximately 250,000 is well below the minimum 750,000 required for an NHL team to survive economically. [3] Additionally, Saskatoon was rumoured as a possible destination for the American Hockey League Manitoba Moose after the Atlanta Thrashers relocated to Winnipeg in 2011. [4] [5] However, the Moose eventually relocated to St. John's, Newfoundland, due in part to the presence of the Saskatoon Blades occupancy of the Credit Union Centre. [5]

The first recorded Provincial Junior Hockey League was organized in the 191617, when E.C. Corbeau donated the Corbeau Cup. The first champions were the Regina Arenas. [6] The 191617 season was also the first season of the Regina Pats, who are the oldest continuously operating junior team in Canada. [7] In 1919 the Saskatchewan Amateur Hockey Association created the Abbott Cup in memory of E.L. (Hick) Abbott who died in the First World War. The Abbot Cup was originally awarded to the best Junior "A" team in Western Canada. After Western Hockey League was sanctioned as the top junior league in Western Canada and the creation of the Ed Chynoweth Cup, the Abbot Cup was awarded to the best junior "B" team in Western Canada until 1999 when the trophy was retired. [8]

Organized women's hockey has been played in Saskatchewan since at least 1912 when a women's team was set up at the University of Saskatchewan. However, as women's hockey only became a Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) sport in 199798, they played unsanctioned competitions against other university and local women's teams, winning the Western Canadian women’s inter-university hockey league champion in 1921 and 1922. They also won the Saskatoon women's city championship in 1929, 1932, 1939 and 1942. Women's hockey was an intramural sport between 1955 and 1976, before the creation of the Labatt Cup: Women’s Hockey Tournament, later renamed the Western Canada Cup, in 1979. [9] The University of Saskatchewan played in the first CIS sanctioned women's championship in the 199798 season, [10] while the University of Regina women's team joined one year later. [11] The University of Regina won their first, and only, conference title in 200001. In 2004, the Saskatchewan Prairie Ice began play in the minor-pro Western Women's Hockey League based out of Lumsden located near Regina. After three losing seasons the team folded in 2007 due to financial reasons. Saskatchewan has won one Abby Hoffman Cup, awarded to the Canadian senior women's "A" champion, won by the Notre Dame Hounds in 201011. [12]

This list does not include teams below the junior age group, or senior teams below the AAA level.

Major professional

Western Canada Hockey League

The Western Canada Hockey League was the first major-professional league on the prairies. Founded in 1921, it collapsed in 1926. [13]

TeamCityExisted [14] League titles [15] Notes [14] [16]
Moose Jaw Sheiks Moose Jaw 1921220Relocated from Saskatoon midseason, returned to Saskatoon for 192223 season
Regina Capitals Regina 1921251
Saskatoon Sheiks Saskatoon 1921, 22260Known as the Saskatoon Crescents from 192225

Minor professional

Western Hockey League

The professional Western Hockey League was formed following a merger with the Pacific Coast Hockey League and the Western Canada Senior Hockey League. The Saskatoon Quakers lost their amateur status when they joined the new league.

TeamCityExisted [17] Lester Patrick Cups [18] Notes [17]
Saskatoon Quakers Saskatoon 195156, 58591
Saskatoon/St. Paul Regals Saskatoon/St. Paul 1957580Split home schedule between Saskatoon and St. Paul, MN

Junior

With no professional teams, the top level of hockey in Saskatchewan is junior. Five teams compete in the Major-Junior Western Hockey League, while the Junior-A Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League comprises 12 teams. The border city of Lloydminster competes in the Alberta Junior Hockey League.

Western Hockey League

Current teams

TeamCityEstablished [19] President's Cups [20] Memorial Cups [21] Notes [19]
Moose Jaw Warriors Moose Jaw 198400Founded in 1980 as the Winnipeg Warriors
Prince Albert Raiders Prince Albert 198221
Regina Pats Regina 196624*Franchise founded in 1917
Saskatoon Blades Saskatoon 196600Founding predates the WHL
Swift Current Broncos Swift Current 196774, 198621Founded in 1967; Existed as the Lethbridge Broncos from 197486

*Three of the Regina Pats' Memorial Cups predate the WHL.

Former teams

TeamCityExisted [19] President's Cups [20] Memorial Cups [21] Notes [19]
Estevan Bruins Estevan 19667110Founding predates the WHL; Became the New Westminster Bruins in 1971
Moose Jaw Canucks Moose Jaw 19666810Founding predates the WHL; Left WCHL to rejoin SJHL
Weyburn Red Wings Weyburn 19666800Founding predates the WHL; Left WCHL to rejoin SJHL

Alberta Junior Hockey League

TeamCityEstablishedLeague titles Doyle Cups Royal Bank Cups Notes
Lloydminster Bobcats Lloydminster 1988000Previously the Lloydminster Lancers of the SJHL (198288); known as the Lloydminster Blazers 198805. [22] [23] The team's arena lies on the Saskatchewan side of the biprovincial city, one block from the border.

Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League

Current teams

TeamCityEstablished [23] League titles [24] Anavet Cups [25] Royal Bank Cups [26] Notes [23]
Battlefords North Stars Battlefords 1973110Known as the Battlefords Barons (197383)
Estevan Bruins Estevan 1971220
Humboldt Broncos Humboldt 19701072
Kindersley Klippers Kindersley 1993200Founded in 1991 as the Saskatoon Titans
La Ronge Ice Wolves La Ronge 1998200
Melfort Mustangs Melfort 1988210
Melville Millionaires Melville 1970000Melville Millionaires' name dates back to 1915
Nipawin Hawks Nipawin 1986110
Notre Dame Hounds Wilcox 1987111Only team to win the National Championship in inaugural season.
Weyburn Red Wings Weyburn 1968852Transferred from Western Hockey League
Yorkton Terriers Yorkton 1972421

Former teams

TeamCityExisted [23] League titles [24] Anavet Cups [25] Royal Bank Cups [26] Notes [23]
Lebret Eagles Lebret 19932001000
Lloydminster Lancers Lloydminster 198288000Transferred to the Alberta Junior Hockey League
Moose Jaw Canucks Moose Jaw 196884000
Prince Albert Raiders Prince Albert 197282872Transferred to the Western Hockey League
Regina Blues Regina 196882000
Regina Silver Foxes Regina 197276000
Saskatoon Olympics Saskatoon 196882000
Saskatoon Rage Saskatoon 198799000Founded in 1987 as the Minot Americans; known as the Minot Top Guns (199497) and Beardy's Rage (199798)
Swift Current Broncos Swift Current 197486100Known as the Swift Current Indians (198386)

Junior B Hockey leagues

The Prairie Junior Hockey League merged with the North Saskatchewan Junior B Hockey League in 2007 to create a more manageable province-wide league.

LeagueRegionEstablished Keystone Cup titles [27] Notes
Prairie Junior Hockey League Regina and Saskatoon region2006113 teams

Junior C Hockey leagues

LeagueRegionEstablished [28] Notes
Saskatchewan Junior C Hockey League Regina and Saskatoon region199616 teams

Semi-professional, senior and amateur

Western Women's Hockey League

The Western Women's Hockey League (WWHL) and the National Women's Hockey League (NWHL) were the top levels of women's hockey in Canada until 2007 with the creation of the Canadian Women's Hockey League. [29] In 2006, an agreement was made that the WWHL would become a division within the NWHL, but would remain an independent league. There was no competition between the winners of the two leagues to determine an overall winner. [30]

TeamCityExisted [31] [32] [33] WWHL titles [34] [35] [36] Notes
Saskatchewan Prairie Ice Lumsden 2004070Suspended operations for the 200708 WWHL season. [37]

Senior

Three senior AAA hockey teams from Saskatchewan have captured the Allan Cup as the national Senior hockey champion of Canada. the Lloydminster Border Kings are the defending Allan Cup champions.

TeamCityEstablished Allan Cups [38] Notes
Lloydminster Border Kings Lloydminster unknownpresent2Member of the Chinook Hockey League [39]
Regina Rangers Regina unknown11941 Allan Cup champions [39]
Regina Victorias Regina unknown11914 Allan Cup champions [40]

University

The Canada West Universities Athletic Association was founded in 1919, representing schools across Western Canada.

TeamCityEstablishedMen's conference titles [41] Women's conference titles [41] University Cups [42] Women's titles [42]
U of R Cougars Regina 19850100
U of S Huskies Saskatoon 1910s14010

College

The Alberta Colleges Athletics Conference organizes sport at the collegiate level.

TeamCityEstablishedACAC titles [43] CCAA national titles [43] ACAC women's titles [44] Notes
Briercrest College Clippers Caronport 199700N/ADoes not play ACAC women's hockey, only men's

League, regional and national championships

ChampionshipTimes wonDescription
WCHL Championship1 Western Canada Hockey League champion [15]
Lester Patrick Cup 1 Western Hockey League (minor pro) champion [18]
Ed Chynoweth Cup 7 Western Hockey League champion [20]
Memorial Cup 6 Canadian Major-Junior national champion [21]
Allan Cup 4Canadian senior national champion [38]
Anavet Cup 29Saskatchewan/Manitoba Junior "A" regional championship [25]
Royal Bank Cup 9 Canadian Junior "A" national champion [26]
Keystone Cup 10Western Canada Junior "B" champion [27]
University Cup 1 CIS national university champion [42]
Totals do not include any championships by the Flin Flon Bombers, as the town is predominantly based in Manitoba.

See also

Related Research Articles

Western Hockey League Sports league

The Western Hockey League (WHL) is a major junior ice hockey league based in Western Canada and the Northwestern United States. The WHL is one of three leagues that constitutes the Canadian Hockey League (CHL) as the highest level of junior hockey in Canada. Teams play for the Ed Chynoweth Cup, with the winner moving on to play for the Memorial Cup, Canada's national junior championship. WHL teams have won the Memorial Cup 19 times since the league became eligible to compete for the trophy. Many players have been drafted from WHL teams, and have found success at various levels of professional hockey, including the National Hockey League (NHL).

William Dickenson Hunter, was a Canadian ice hockey player, general manager and coach. Hunter was involved in hockey, Canadian football, baseball, softball and curling, but he is best known for founding the Western Hockey League (WHL), being a key player in the upstart World Hockey Association (WHA) and for his efforts to bring professional hockey to previously overlooked Western Canadian cities, especially in Edmonton and (unsuccessfully) in Saskatoon.

Flin Flon Bombers Ice hockey team

The Flin Flon Bombers are a junior ice hockey team based in Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada. They are affiliated with the Canadian Junior Hockey League as a member of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL). Their home rink is the Whitney Forum. Radio station CFAR live broadcasts a select number of home and away games throughout the year as well as all playoff games.

Saskatoon Blades Major junior ice hockey team based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

The Saskatoon Blades are a major junior ice hockey team playing in the Eastern Division of the Western Hockey League, formerly the Western Canadian Hockey League (WCHL). They are based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, playing at the 15,195-seat SaskTel Centre.

Prince Albert Raiders

The Prince Albert Raiders are a major junior ice hockey team in the Western Hockey League. The Raiders play in the East Division of the Eastern Conference. They are based in the city of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada. The team plays its home games at the Art Hauser Centre.

Estevan Bruins Ice hockey team in Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada

The Estevan Bruins are a junior ice hockey team playing in the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL). The team is based in Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada, and plays at Affinity Place.

Max Bentley Canadian ice hockey player

Maxwell Herbert Lloyd "Max" Bentley was a Canadian ice hockey forward who played for the Chicago Blackhawks, Toronto Maple Leafs, and New York Rangers in the National Hockey League (NHL) as part of a professional and senior career that spanned 20 years. He was the NHL's leading scorer twice in a row, and in 1946 won the Hart Trophy as most valuable player. He played in four All-Star Games and was twice named to a post-season All-Star team.

Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League

The Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League is a Junior A ice hockey league under Hockey Canada, a part of the Canadian Junior Hockey League. Open to North American-born players 20 years of age or younger, the SJHL's 12 teams play in three divisions: the Olympic Buildings, Sherwood and Viterra Divisions. A major attraction in Saskatchewan, the SJHL draws 400,000 fans each season. The winner of the SJHL playoffs continues on to play in the ANAVET Cup against the champion from the MJHL, for the right to represent the Western region at the Centennial Cup, the national Junior A championship.

Jarret Stoll Canadian ice hockey player

Jarret Lee Stoll is a Canadian former professional ice hockey player. Stoll has played in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Edmonton Oilers, Los Angeles Kings, New York Rangers and Minnesota Wild.

Cam Ward

Cameron Kenneth Ward is a Canadian former professional ice hockey goaltender. He played the majority of his fifteen-year professional career for the Carolina Hurricanes of the National Hockey League (NHL). He played for the Chicago Blackhawks during his final season before signing a one-day contract to officially retire as a Hurricane in 2019.

The 1966–67 CMJHL season was the inaugural season of the Canadian Major Junior Hockey League. It was formed by five members of the former Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League along with the Edmonton Oil Kings and the Calgary Buffaloes and was considered an "outlaw league" by the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association.

Ed Chynoweth Cup Western Hockey League trophy

The Ed Chynoweth Cup is an ice hockey club championship trophy awarded to the playoff champion of the Western Hockey League (WHL). Originally called the President's Cup when the league was founded in 1966, the trophy was renamed in 2007 to honour Ed Chynoweth's long service to junior hockey in Canada. The WHL champion earns a berth into the Memorial Cup tournament, Canada's major junior championship. The Kamloops Blazers have won the most championships with six, followed by the Medicine Hat Tigers with five. The Spokane Chiefs were the first team to win the renamed trophy in the 2007–08 WHL season. The current (2018–19) holders of the Ed Chynoweth Cup are the Prince Albert Raiders.

Abbott Cup

The Abbott Memorial Cup, commonly referred to as the Abbott Cup, was awarded annually from 1919 through 1999 to the Junior "A" ice hockey Champion for Western Canada.

Moose Jaw Canucks

The Moose Jaw Canucks were a junior ice hockey team based in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. They were one of the founding members of the Western Canada Junior Hockey League in 1966 following a rebellion within the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League. The franchise evolved from the Moose Jaw Cubs in the early 1930s.

Sport in Saskatchewan includes ice skating, speed skating, curling, curling bonspiels, snowboarding, snow golf, broomball, ice hockey, badminton, and curling. Summer sports abound: among these are school track and field days, community rodeos, golf tournaments, and sporting events such as baseball, softball, and snowmobile, snowmobile rallies. School teams usually feature baseball, basketball, field hockey, Association football or soccer, lacrosse, football, rugby, and wrestling. Popular individual sports include auto racing, boxing, cycling, golf, hiking, horse racing, ice skating, skateboarding, skiing, swimming, tennis, triathlon, track and field, and water sports. Other sports include tobogganing, sailing, rowing, trap shooting, lawn bowling, and horseshoe. Saskatchewan speed skaters have enjoyed recent success in the Olympics in Salt Lake City and Turin. The Saskatchewan Olympic medalists include Catriona Le May Doan, Jason Parker and Justin Warsylewicz.

Brayden Schenn Canadian ice hockey player

Brayden Michael Schenn is a Canadian professional ice hockey centre and alternate captain for the St. Louis Blues of the National Hockey League (NHL). He was selected by the Los Angeles Kings fifth overall in the 2009 NHL Entry Draft. He also played for the Philadelphia Flyers before being traded to St. Louis in 2017.

2008–09 WHL season Sports season

The 2008–09 WHL season was the 43rd season of the Western Hockey League (WHL). The regular season began on September 18, 2008, and ended on March 15, 2009. The WHL Playoffs commenced on March 20, 2009, and the 2008 ADT Canada Russia Challenge series, featuring Team WHL versus the Russian Selects, took place from November 26–27, 2008. The Kelowna Rockets won the Ed Chynoweth Cup as WHL champions.

The 2009–10 WHL season is the 44th season of the Western Hockey League (WHL). The regular season began on September 17, 2009 and ended on March 14, 2010. The 2009 Subway Super Series, featuring Team WHL versus Team Russia, took place from November 25–26, 2009.

Robert Lowes is a Canadian ice hockey executive, and former ice hockey coach. He has worked as the assistant director of player personnel for the Vegas Golden Knights since 2016. Lowes lead the Nipawin Hawks to the 1990 ANAVET Cup championship, before being a head coach in the Western Hockey League (WHL) for 12 seasons with the Brandon Wheat Kings, and the Regina Pats. He twice won the Dunc McCallum Memorial Trophy as the WHL Coach of the Year, and twice won the CHL Coach of the Year Award. Lowes also coached the Canada men's national under-18 ice hockey team, and later became director of amateur scouting for the Ottawa Senators.

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