List of journals appearing under the French Revolution

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Le Tribun du peuple de Gracchus Babeuf Tribundupeuple.jpg
Le Tribun du peuple de Gracchus Babeuf

List of Journals appearing during the French Revolution  :

French Revolution social and political revolution in France and its colonies occurring from 1789 to 1798

The French Revolution was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies beginning in 1789. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies. Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history.

Contents

A

Les Actes des Apotres was a French royalist newspaper that was published from 1789 to 1791 during the French Revolution.

Louis-Sébastien Mercier French dramatist and writer

Louis-Sébastien Mercier was a French dramatist and writer.

Jean-Lambert Tallien French political figure of the revolutionary period

Jean-Lambert Tallien was a French political figure of the revolutionary period.

B

Claude Fauchet (revolutionist) French revolutionary bishop

Claude Fauchet was a French bishop.

Pierre-André Coffinhal-Dubail, known as Jean-Baptiste Coffinhal, was a lawyer, French revolutionary, member of the General Council of the Paris commune and a judge of the Revolutionary Tribunal.

C

Jean-Marie Collot dHerbois French actor and writer

Jean-Marie Collot d'Herbois was a French actor, dramatist, essayist, and revolutionary. He was a member of the Committee of Public Safety during the Reign of Terror and, while he saved Madame Tussaud from the Guillotine, he administered the execution of more than 2,000 people in the city of Lyon.

Étienne Clavière French politician and financier of Genevan origin

Étienne Clavière was a Genevan-born French financier and politician of the French Revolution.

Dominique Joseph Garat French politician

Dominique Joseph Garat was a French Basque writer and politician.

D

Pierre Philippeaux, was a French lawyer who was a deputy to the National Convention for Sarthe.

E

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H

I

J

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L

M

N

O

P

Q

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Jean-Paul Marat politician and journalist during the French Revolution

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Camille Desmoulins French politician

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Antoine Quentin Fouquier-Tinville French lawyer during the French Revolution and Reign of Terror

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Cordeliers Political group during the French Revolution (1790-1794)

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Lycée Louis-le-Grand French school in the heart of the Quartier latin in Paris, France

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The Hébertists, or Exaggerators were a radical revolutionary political group associated with the populist journalist Jacques Hébert, a member of the Cordeliers club. They came to power during the Reign of Terror and played a significant role in the French Revolution.

Society of the Friends of the Blacks 18th-century French abolitionist society

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La Loge des Neuf Sœurs, established in Paris in 1776, was a prominent French Masonic Lodge of the Grand Orient de France that was influential in organising French support for the American Revolution. A "Société des Neuf Sœurs," a charitable society that surveyed academic curricula, had been active at the Académie Royale des Sciences since 1769. Its name referred to the nine Muses, the daughters of Mnemosyne/Memory, patrons of the arts and sciences since antiquity, and long significant in French cultural circles. The Lodge of similar name and purpose was opened in 1776, by Jérôme de Lalande. From the start of the French Revolution in 1789 until 1792, "Les Neuf Sœurs" became a "Société Nationale".

Sylvain Maréchal French writer and philosopher

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Society of the Friends of Truth organization

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Antoine-François Momoro publisher during the French Revolution

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Jean-François Varlet was a leader of the Enragé faction in the French Revolution.

Errancis Cemetery cemetery located in Paris, in France

Errancis Cemetery or Cimetière des Errancis is a former cemetery in the 8th arrondissement of Paris and was one of the four cemeteries used to dispose of the corpses of guillotine victims during the French Revolution.

Napoléon Aubin journalist, publisher, playwright, and scientist

Napoléon Aubin, christened Aimé-Nicolas, was born from a Swiss family in Chêne-Bougeries, a district of Geneva, at the time a territory of France. He was a journalist, writer, publisher, scientist, musician and lithographer.

François Topino-Lebrun French painter

François Jean-Baptiste Topino-Lebrun was a French painter and revolutionary. He worked in the Neo-Classical style and was said to be the favorite student of Jacques-Louis David.

Joseph-François-Nicolas Dusaulchoy de Bergemont was a French playwright, writer and journalist.

The prix Broquette-Gonin was a former prize awarded by the Académie française.

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Further reading