List of municipalities in Nunavut

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Location of Nunavut in Canada Nunavut in Canada 2.svg
Location of Nunavut in Canada
Distribution of Nunavut's 25 municipalities by type Nunavut municipalities.png
Distribution of Nunavut's 25 municipalities by type

Nunavut is the least populous of Canada's three territories with 36,858 residents as of 2021, but the largest territory in land area, at 1,836,993.78 km2 (709,267.26 sq mi). [1] Nunavut is also larger than any of Canada's ten provinces. [1] Nunavut's 25 municipalities cover only

Contents

Municipalities are created by the Government of Nunavut in accordance with the Cities, Towns and Villages Act (CTVA) [6] and the Hamlets Act. [7] According to the CTVA, a municipality is an "area within the boundaries of a municipal corporation, as described in the order establishing or continuing the municipal corporation" where a municipal corporation is either a city, town or village. [6] According to the Hamlets Act, a municipality is similarly an "area within the boundaries of a hamlet, as described in the order establishing or continuing the hamlet". All of Nunavut's 25 municipalities are hamlets except for the City of Iqaluit, [5] which is the territory's capital.

The largest municipality by population in Nunavut is the capital city, Iqaluit, with 7,429 residents, home to

Cities

An application can be submitted to incorporate a community as a city under the CTVA at the request of a minimum 25 residents that are eligible electors, or at the initiative of the Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs. [6] :s.2 The proposed city must have a minimum assessed land value of $200 million or an exception made by the Minister. [6] :s.4(3)(c) Iqaluit is the only city in Nunavut, with 7,429 residents and a land area of 51.58 km2 (19.92 sq mi) in 2021. [3] It incorporated as a city on April 19, 2001. [8]

Towns

Although Nunavut has no municipalities with town status, the CTVA provides opportunity to incorporate a town. A town can be incorporated at the request of a minimum 25 residents that are eligible electors, or at the initiative of the Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs. [6] :s.2 The proposed town must have a minimum assessed land value of $50 million or an exception made by the Minister. [6] :s.4(3)(b) Iqaluit held town status between 1980 and 2001. [9]

Villages

Nunavut has no villages, but like town status the CTVA provides opportunity to incorporate a village. A village can be incorporated at the request of a minimum 25 residents that are eligible electors, or at the initiative of the Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs. [6] :s.2 The proposed village must have a minimum assessed land value of $10 million or an exception made by the Minister. [6] :s.4(3)(a) Iqaluit held village status between 1974 and 1980. [9]

Hamlets

At the request of a minimum 25 residents that are eligible electors, or at the initiative of the Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs, an application can be submitted to incorporate a community as a hamlet under the Hamlets Act. [7] :s.2 Unlike cities, towns and villages, the incorporation of hamlets is not conditioned by a prescribed minimum assessed land value. [7] :s.4

Nunavut has 24 hamlets. The largest hamlet by population is Rankin Inlet, with 2,975 residents, and the smallest is Grise Fiord, with 144 residents. [3] The largest hamlet by land area is Kugluktuk, which spans 538.99 km2 (208.11 sq mi), while the smallest is Kimmirut, at 2.30 km2 (0.89 sq mi). [3]

List of municipalities

Iqaluit, Nunavut's capital city and largest municipality Iqlauit waterfront.JPG
Iqaluit, Nunavut's capital city and largest municipality
Rankin Inlet, Nunavut's second-largest municipality, largest hamlet and runner-up in the 1995 capital city plebiscite Downtown Rankin Inlet.jpg
Rankin Inlet, Nunavut's second-largest municipality, largest hamlet and runner-up in the 1995 capital city plebiscite
Nunavut's third-largest municipality and second-largest hamlet is Arviat. Arviat Church Centers 1995-06-30.jpg
Nunavut's third-largest municipality and second-largest hamlet is Arviat.
Baker Lake is the fourth-largest municipality in Nunavut. BakerLake2009.JPG
Baker Lake is the fourth-largest municipality in Nunavut.
List of municipalities in Nunavut
NameStatus [5] 2021 Census of Population [3]
Population
(2021)
Population
(2016)
ChangeLand area
(km2)
Population
density
(/km2)
Arctic Bay Hamlet994868+14.5%245.164.1
Arviat Hamlet2,8642,657+7.8%126.1422.7
Baker Lake Hamlet2,0612,069−0.4%179.5411.5
Cambridge Bay Hamlet1,7601,766−0.3%195.789.0
Chesterfield Inlet Hamlet397437−9.2%139.492.8
Clyde River Hamlet1,1811,053+12.2%103.3811.4
Coral Harbour Hamlet1,035891+16.2%126.398.2
Gjoa Haven Hamlet1,3491,324+1.9%28.5547.3
Grise Fiord Hamlet144129+11.6%332.900.4
Igloolik Hamlet2,0491,744+17.5%104.8619.5
Iqaluit City7,4297,740−4.0%51.58144.0
Kimmirut Hamlet426389+9.5%2.30185.2
Kinngait Hamlet1,3961,441−3.1%9.89141.2
Kugaaruk Hamlet1,033933+10.7%5.06204.2
Kugluktuk Hamlet1,3821,491−7.3%538.992.6
Naujaat [lower-alpha 1] Hamlet1,2251,082+13.2%406.193.0
Pangnirtung Hamlet1,5041,481+1.6%7.98188.5
Pond Inlet Hamlet1,5551,617−3.8%170.839.1
Qikiqtarjuaq Hamlet593598−0.8%130.804.5
Rankin Inlet Hamlet2,9752,842+4.7%20.03148.5
Resolute Hamlet183198−7.6%115.021.6
Sanikiluaq Hamlet1,010882+14.5%109.689.2
Sanirajak Hamlet891848+5.1%16.3654.5
Taloyoak Hamlet9341,029−9.2%35.3826.4
Whale Cove Hamlet470435+8.0%273.891.7
Total municipalities36,84035,944+2.5%3,476.1710.6
Nunavut36,85835,944+2.5%1,836,993.780.0

See also

Notes

  1. Repulse Bay was officially renamed Naujaat on July 2, 2015. [10]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Iqaluit</span> Capital city of Nunavut, Canada

Iqaluit is the capital of the Canadian territory of Nunavut, its largest community, and its only city. It was known as Frobisher Bay from 1942 to 1987, after the large bay on the coast on which the city is situated. In 1987, its traditional Inuktitut name was restored.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Pangnirtung</span> Place in Nunavut, Canada

Pangnirtung is an Inuit hamlet, in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of the Canadian territory of Nunavut, located on Baffin Island. The community is located about 45 km (28 mi) south of the Arctic Circle, and about 2,700 km (1,700 mi) from the North Pole. Pangnirtung is situated on a coastal plain at the coast of Pangnirtung Fjord, a fjord which eventually merges with Cumberland Sound. As of January 2022, the mayor is Stevie Komoartok.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sanikiluaq</span> Place in Nunavut, Canada

Sanikiluaq is a municipality and Inuit community located on the north coast of Flaherty Island in Hudson Bay, on the Belcher Islands. Despite being geographically much closer to the shores of Ontario and Quebec, the community and the Belcher Islands lie within the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kugluktuk</span> Hamlet in Nunavut, Canada

Kugluktuk, formerly known as Coppermine until 1 January 1996, is a hamlet located at the mouth of the Coppermine River in the Kitikmeot Region of Nunavut, Canada, on Coronation Gulf, southwest of Victoria Island. It is the westernmost community in Nunavut, near the border with the Northwest Territories.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Naujaat</span> Place in Nunavut, Canada

Naujaat, known until 2 July 2015 as Repulse Bay, is an Inuit hamlet situated on the Arctic Circle. It is located on the shores of Hudson Bay, at the south end of the Melville Peninsula, in the Kivalliq Region of Nunavut, Canada.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kimmirut</span> Hamlet in Nunavut, Canada

Kimmirut is a community in the Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is located on the shore of Hudson Strait on Baffin Island's Meta Incognita Peninsula. Kimmirut means "heel", and refers to a rocky outcrop in the inlet.

References

  1. 1 2 "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, 2021 and 2016 censuses – 100% data". Statistics Canada. March 14, 2022. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  2. "Interim List of Changes to Municipal Boundaries, Status, and Names: From January 2, 2012 to January 1, 2013" (PDF) (PDF). Statistics Canada. pp. 6–7. Retrieved August 19, 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), Nunavut". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved February 19, 2022.
  4. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data". Statistics Canada. February 6, 2017. Retrieved February 11, 2017.
  5. 1 2 3 "List of municipalities Nunavut". Canada Revenue Agency. September 6, 2013. Retrieved January 15, 2014.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Cities, Towns and Villages Act , RSNWT (Nu) 1988, c. C-8.
  7. 1 2 3 Hamlets Act , RSNWT (Nu) 1988, c. H-1
  8. "Interim List of Changes to Municipal Boundaries, Status, and Names From January 2, 2001 to January 1, 2006" (PDF). Statistics Canada. June 2007. p. 372. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  9. 1 2 "About Iqaluit: History". City of Iqaluit. Archived from the original on December 11, 2014. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  10. "Naujaat, Nunavut, residents celebrate official renaming: Repulse Bay changes its name to Naujaat, Inuktitut for 'a nesting place for seagulls'". CBC News. July 6, 2015. Retrieved August 21, 2015.