List of operas by Gaetano Donizetti

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This is a list of the operas by the Italian composer Gaetano Donizetti (1797–1848).

Gaetano Donizetti 19th-century Italian opera composer

Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti was an Italian composer. Along with Gioachino Rossini and Vincenzo Bellini, Donizetti was a leading composer of the bel canto opera style during the first half of the nineteenth century. Donizetti's close association with the bel canto style was undoubtedly an influence on other composers such as Giuseppe Verdi.

Title [1] GenreSub­divi­sionsLibrettoPremiere date [2] Place, theatreNotes
scena drammatica1 act Bergamo, Teatro Donizetti  
Olimpiade   Metastasio's L'Olimpiade  
 1 act  
Enrico di Borgogna melodramma 2 actsVenice, Teatro San Luca  
farsa 1 actVenice, Teatro San Luca
opera buffa1 act   pasticcio performed by Mayr's students
opera buffa2 actsVenice, Teatro San Samuele  
opera buffa2 actsMantua, Teatro Vecchio 
Zoraida di Granata melodramma eroico2 actsRome, Teatro Argentina, rev. 7 January 1824 at the same theatre 
dramma2 actsNaples, Teatro Nuovo  
farsa1 actNaples, Teatro del Fondo  
Chiara e Serafina, o Il piratamelodramma semiserio2 actsMilan, La Scala  
Alfredo il grande dramma per musica2 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
dramma giocoso2 actsNaples, Teatro Nuovo 
melodramma giocoso2 actsRome, Teatro Valle  
Emilia di Liverpool
[see also L'eremitaggio di Liverpool]
dramma semiserio2 actsanonymous, after S. Scatizzi's Emilia de LaverpautNaples, Teatro Nuovo 
Alahor in Granata dramma2 actsPalermo, Teatro Carolino 
Don Gregorio
[rev of L'ajo nell'imbarazzo]
melodramma giocoso2 actsNaples, Teatro Nuovo 
Elvida dramma1 actGiovanni F. Schmidt [7] Naples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Gabriella di Vergy tragedia lirica3 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Olivo e Pasquale melodramma giocoso2 actsRome, Teatro Valle  
Otto mesi in due ore, ossia Gli esiliati in Siberiaopera romantica3 actsNaples, Teatro Nuovo 
melodramma giocoso2 actsNaples, Teatro del Fondo  
farsa1 actNaples, Teatro Nuovo 
melodramma eroico2 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
melodramma semiserio [9] 2 actsNaples, Teatro Nuovo 
Alina, regina di Golconda melodramma2 actsGenoa, Teatro Carlo Felice  
Gianni di Calais melodramma semiserio3 actsNaples, Teatro del Fondo  
melodramma2 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
farsa [12] 1 actNaples, Teatro del Fondo  
melodramma3 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Alina, regina di Golconda [rev]melodramma2 actsRome, Teatro Valle [10]  
farsa [13] 1 actNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
azione tragica-sacra3 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Imelda de' Lambertazzi melodramma tragico2 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Anna Bolena tragedia lirica2 actsMilan, Teatro Carcano  
Gianni di Parigi melodramma comico [16] 2 actsMilan, La Scala  
dramma giocoso2 actsMilan, Teatro alla Canobbiana  
Francesca di Foix melodramma1 actNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
farsa1 actNaples, Teatro del Fondo (arias and ensembles survive but spoken dialogue is lost) 
Fausta melodramma2 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Ugo, conte di Parigi tragedia lirica4 actsMilan, La Scala  
melodramma giocoso2 actsMilan, Teatro alla Canobbiana  
Sancia di Castiglia tragedia lirica2 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
melodramma2 actsRome, Teatro Valle  
Otto mesi in due ore [rev]opera romantica3 actsLivorno 
Parisina melodramma3 actsFlorence, Teatro della Pergola  
Torquato Tasso melodramma3 actsRome, Teatro Valle  
melodrammaMilan, La Scala  
azione tragico-sacra3 actsGenoa, Teatro Carlo Felice  
Rosmonda d'Inghilterra melodramma serio2 actsFlorence, Teatro della Pergola  
tragedia lirica2 acts (or 3)Milan, La Scala  
tragedia lirica2 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Gemma di Vergy tragedia lirica2 actsMilan, La Scala  
Marino Faliero tragedia lirica3 actsParis, Théâtre-Italien  
Lucia di Lammermoor
[see also Lucie de Lammermoor ]
dramma tragico3 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Belisario tragedia lirica3 actsVenice, La Fenice  
melodramma giocoso1 actNaples, Teatro Nuovo 
dramma giocoso1 actNaples, Teatro Nuovo 
dramma lirico3 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
tragedia lirica2 actsVenice, Teatro Apollo  
tragedia lirica2 acts Sinigaglia  
dramma giocoso2 actsNaples, Teatro del Fondo  
Roberto Devereux tragedia lirica3 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Maria de Rudenz dramma tragico3 actsVenice, La Fenice  
Gabriella di Vergy [rev]tragedia lirica2 actsLondon 
tragedia lirica3 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
tragedia lirica2 actsRome, Teatro Argentina [21]  
Lucie de Lammermoor
[rev of Lucia di Lammermoor, in French]
grand opéra [22] 3 acts (or 4) [22] Paris, Théâtre de la Renaissance  
grand opéra4 acts  
opera semiseria4 partsCovent Garden 
dramma per musicaMilan, La Scala  
grand opéra4 acts Paris Opera, Salle Le Peletier  
opéra comique 2 actsParis, Opéra-Comique  
dramma per musicaParis, Théâtre-Italien  
grand opéra4 acts Paris Opera, Salle Le Peletier  
Adelia melodramma serio3 actsRome, Teatro Apollo  
Rita
(Deux hommes et une femme)
opéra comique1 actParis, Opéra-Comique  
Maria Padilla melodramma3 actsMilan, La Scala  
Linda di Chamounix melodramma semiserio3 actsVienna, Kärntnertortheater  
Linda di Chamounix [rev]melodramma semiserio3 actsParis, Théâtre-Italien  
Caterina Cornaro tragedia lirica2 actsNaples, Teatro di San Carlo  
Don Pasquale dramma buffo3 actsParis, Théâtre-Italien  
Maria di Rohan melodramma tragico3 actsVienna, Kärntnertortheater  
Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugalgrand opéra5 acts Paris Opera, Salle Le Peletier  
Dom Sebastian von Portugal
[rev of Dom Sébastien]
große Oper [27] 5 actsVienna, Kärntnertortheater  
opera4 acts [28] Rome, Teatro Apollo  

Related Research Articles

<i>Il campanello</i> opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Il campanello or Il campanello di notte is a melodramma giocoso, or opera, in one act by Gaetano Donizetti. The composer wrote the Italian libretto after Mathieu-Barthélemy Troin Brunswick and Victor Lhérie's French vaudeville La sonnette de nuit. The premiere took place on 1 June 1836 at the Teatro Nuovo in Naples and was "revived every year over the next decade".

<i>Alahor in Granata</i> opera

Alahor in Granata is an opera in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti to an anonymous Italian libretto after Jean-Pierre Claris de Florian's text Gonzalve de Cordoue, ou Granade reconquise (1793). However, it seems that the original basis of the libretto goes back to one by Felice Romani written for Meyerbeer in 1821, which in turn can be traced back through another iteration to begin with the de Florian version.

<i>Olivo e Pasquale</i> opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Olivo e Pasquale is a melodramma giocoso, a romantic comedy opera, in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Jacopo Ferretti wrote the Italian libretto after Antonio Simeone Sografi's play.

<i>Ugo, conte di Parigi</i> opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Ugo, conte di Parigi is a tragedia lirica, or tragic opera, in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Felice Romani wrote the Italian libretto after Hippolyte-Louis-Florent Bis's Blanche d'Aquitaine. It premiered on 13 March 1832 at La Scala, Milan.

<i>Emilia di Liverpool</i> opera

Emilia di Liverpool is a dramma semiserio, ("half-serious") dramatic opera, in two acts with music by Gaetano Donizetti. Giuseppe Checcherini wrote the Italian libretto after the anonymous libretto for Vittorio Trento's Emilia di Laverpaut, itself based on Stefano Scatizzi's play of the same name. It premiered on 28 July 1824 at the Teatro Nuovo in Naples.

<i>Il diluvio universale</i> opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Il diluvio universale is an azione tragico-sacra, or opera, by Gaetano Donizetti. The Italian libretto was written by Domenico Gilardoni after Lord Byron's Heaven and Earth and Francesco Ringhieri's tragedy Il diluvio (1788).

<i>Zoraida di Granata</i> opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Zoraida di Granata is a melodramma eroico, in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. The Italian libretto had been partly prepared Bartolomeo Merelli, based on the French play, Gonzalve de Cordoue ou Grenade Reconquise by Jean-Pierre Claris de Florian (1791), and on a libretto by Luigi Romanelli to an opera by Nicolini called Abenamet e Zoraide.

<i>Marino Faliero</i> (opera) opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Marino Faliero is a tragedia lirica, or tragic opera, in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Giovanni Emanuele Bidera wrote the Italian libretto, with revisions by Agostino Ruffini, after Casimir Delavigne's play. It is inspired by Lord Byron's drama Marino Faliero (1820) and based on the life of Marino Faliero (c.1285-1355), the Venetian Doge.

<i>Torquato Tasso</i> (opera) �

Torquato Tasso is a melodramma semiserio, or 'semi-serious' opera, in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti and based on the life of the great poet Torquato Tasso. The Italian libretto was written by Jacopo Ferretti, who used a number of sources for his text, including works by Giovanni Rosini, Goethe, Goldoni, and Lord Byron as well as Tasso's actual poetry. It premiered on 9 September 1833 at the Teatro Valle, Rome.

<i>Il Pigmalione</i> opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Il Pigmalione (Pygmalion) is a scena lirica in one act by Gaetano Donizetti. The librettist is unknown, but it is known that the libretto was based on one by Antonio Simeone Sografi for Giovanni Battista Cimador's Pimmalione (1790), in turn based on Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Pygmalion and ultimately based on Book X of Ovid's Metamorphoses. Sografi's libretto was also used for an opera by Bonifacio Asioli (1796).

<i>Imelda de Lambertazzi</i> opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Imelda de' Lambertazzi is a melodramma tragico or tragic opera in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti from a libretto by Andrea Leone Tottola, based on the tragedy Imelda by Gabriele Sperduti. It received its first performance on 5 September 1830 at the Teatro San Carlo, Naples.

<i>Gianni di Calais</i> opera

Gianni di Calais is a melodramma semiserio, a "semi-serious" opera in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti (1828), from a libretto by Domenico Gilardoni, based on Jean de Paris by Louis-Charles Caigniez.

<i>Alfredo il grande</i> opera

Alfredo il grande is a melodramma serio or serious opera in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Andrea Leone Tottola wrote the Italian libretto, which may have been derived from Johann Simon Mayr's 1818 opera of the same name. The opera tells the story of the Anglo-Saxon king Alfred the Great.

Giovanni Ruffini Italian poet and opera librettist

Giovanni Ruffini was an Italian writer and patriot of the early 19th century. He is chiefly known for having written the draft of the libretto of the opera Don Pasquale for its composer Gaetano Donizetti.

<i>Sancia di Castiglia</i> opera

Sancia di Castiglia is an Italian opera seria in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti to a libretto by Pietro Salatino. It was first performed at the Teatro San Carlo in Naples, on 4 November 1832 conducted by Nicola Festa.

<i>Adelia</i> (opera) opera by Gaetano Donizetti

Adelia, o La figlia dell'arciere is an opera in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. The Italian libretto was written partly by Felice Romani and by Girolamo Maria Marini, a part-time poet who had achieved notability the previous year with Otto Nicolai's Il templario. The opera premiered at the Teatro Apollo, Rome on 11 February 1841.

<i>Il giovedì grasso</i> opera farsa in one act by Gaetano Donizetti

Il giovedì grasso is a farsa in one act by Gaetano Donizetti, from a libretto by Domenico Gilardoni. The literal translation of the title is "Fat Thursday", a reference to Carnival celebration. The libretto was adapted from the French comedies Monsieur de Pourceaugnac by Molière and Le nouveau Pourceaugnac by Charles-Gaspard Delestre-Poirson and Eugène Scribe. The opera uses spoken dialogue rather than recitatives, and the buffo role is given in the Neapolitan language. The work premiered at the Teatro del Fondo in Naples on 26 February 1829.

<i>Una follia</i> opera

Una follia is a farsa in one act by composer Gaetano Donizetti. The work premiered on 15 December 1818 at the Teatro San Luca in Venice. The opera uses the same Italian-language libretto by Bartolomeo Merelli after August von Kotzebue's Der Graf von Burgund that Donizetti used for his Enrico di Borgogna a month earlier, but with different music. It was given one performance and "never performed again, and its score has never been found."

<i>La lettera anonima</i> opera

La lettera anonima is a farce in one act composed by Gaetano Donizetti in 1822 to a libretto by Giulio Genoino, a former monk and the official censor of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. Genoino based his libretto on his own farce which, in turn, had been based on Mélite, ou Les fausses lettres by Pierre Corneille in 1630.

References

Notes

  1. The information in the table is taken from Smart and Budden 2001, unless otherwise noted.
  2. Operas are initially listed by date of completion of composition, which usually correlates closely with the date of the premiere. When the date of completion is significantly earlier than the date of the premiere (or there was no premiere), the date of composition is given. However, the column rows sort by the date of the premiere (or by the date of composition, if there is no premiere). To restore the initial state use the browser refresh button.
  3. Olimpiade: Donizetti composed the one duet from Metastasio's famous libretto, probably during his student days for his friends. A copyist full score is located in the Museo Donizettiano, Bergamo (Ashbrook 1982, pp. 580–581).
  4. L'ira di Achille: Donizetti set the first act and a duet from Act 2 scene v. The libretto, probably by Felice Romani, had previously been set by Giuseppe Nicolini (Milan, 1814). A copyist full score of a bass aria with chorus is listed in the catalog of the Museo Donizettiano, Bergamo (Ashbrook 1982, p. 580).
  5. I piccioli virtuosi ambulanti was the title of one of the annual end-of-term pasticcios that were organized by the Bergamo music school's director, the composer Simon Mayr. Donizetti contributed an introduzione and a scene with aria and chorus, which he also used in Le nozze in villa (Ashbrook 1982, p. 581).
  6. Allitt 1991, p. 26
  7. Weinstock 1963 , p. 36: He notes that Schmidt "wrote more than one hundred librettos"
  8. Osborne 1994, p. 158.
  9. OCLC   498281465
  10. 1 2 Ashbrook 1982, p. 544.
  11. Steiner-Isenmann 1982, p. 503; Smart and Budden 2001.
  12. Ashbrook 1982, p. 547.
  13. Ashbrook 1982, p. 548.
  14. Smart and Budden 2001.
  15. Ashbrook 1982, p. 549.
  16. OCLC   40787703 , 82723197
  17. Osborne 1994, p. 198.
  18. Ashbrook 1982, p. 551, and Osborne 1994, p. 200. Smart & Budden 2001 and Ashbrook 1992 say Gilardoni's libretto was based on Charles Simon Favart's libretto Ninette à la cour as adapted for Louis Joseph Saint-Amans' 2-act 1791 opéra-comique.
  19. Ashbrook & Hibberd 2001, p. 235.
  20. 1 2 Ashbrook & Hibberd 2001, p. 236.
  21. 1 2 Osborne 1994, p. 257.
  22. 1 2 Lucie de Lammermoor. OCLC   71624699 , 18597094.
  23. Le duc d'Albe: composed April–October 1839 (Ashbrook 1982, p. 567). See also OCLC   63909833.
  24. Ashbrook 1982, p. 569.
  25. Ashbrook 1982, p. 571.
  26. Weinstock 1963, pp. 188—189
  27. Dom Sebastian von Portugal. OCLC   79789205.
  28. Il duca d'Alba. OCLC   174363469.

Sources

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Amanda Juliet Holden is a British musician, librettist and translator.

International Music Score Library Project project for the creation of a virtual library of public domain music scores

The International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP), also known as the Petrucci Music Library after publisher Ottaviano Petrucci, is a subscription-based project for the creation of a virtual library of public-domain music scores. Since its launch on February 16, 2006, over 370,000 scores and 42,000 recordings for over 110,000 works by over 14,000 composers have been uploaded. Based on the wiki principle, the project uses MediaWiki software. Since June 6, 2010, the IMSLP has also included public domain and licensed recordings in its scope, to allow for study by ear.