List of players who have appeared in multiple FIFA Women's World Cups

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In the FIFA Women's World Cup, the following female players have been named in the national team squad in at least four finals tournaments.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

Contents

Tournaments

TeamPlayer [n 1] In squad [n 2] Played [n 3] Tournaments [n 4]
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Formiga [1] 771995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Homare Sawa [2] 661995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Kristine Lilly [3] 551991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Birgit Prinz [3] 551995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Christie Rampone [4] 551999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Cristiane 552003, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Marta 552003, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Christine Sinclair 552003, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Onome Ebi 552003, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Bente Nordby [3] 54(1991), 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Nadine Angerer [5] 53(1999), (2003), 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Karina LeBlanc [6] 52(1999), 2003, (2007), 2011, (2015)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Sun Wen 441991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Bettina Wiegmann 441991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Florence Omagbemi 441991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Nkiru Okosieme 441991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Hege Riise 441991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Joy Fawcett 441991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Julie Foudy 441991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Mia Hamm 441991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Pretinha 441991, 1995, 1999, 2007
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Cheryl Salisbury 441995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Tânia 441995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Andrea Neil 441995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Sandra Minnert 441995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Sandra Smisek 441995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Briana Scurry 441995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Ariane Hingst 441999, 2003, 2007, 2011
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Stella Mbachu 441999, 2003, 2007, 2011
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Solveig Gulbrandsen 441999, 2003, 2007, 2015
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Kozue Ando 441999, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Melissa Barbieri 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Rosana 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Diana Matheson 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Rhian Wilkinson 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Aya Miyama 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Precious Dede 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Perpetua Nkwocha 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Trine Rønning 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Therese Sjögran 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Shannon Boxx [4] 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Abby Wambach [4] 442003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Lisa De Vanna 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Sophie Schmidt 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of England.svg  England Karen Carney 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of England.svg  England Jill Scott 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Katie Duncan [7] 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Abby Erceg [7] 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Annalie Longo [7] 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Ria Percival [7] 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Ali Riley [7] 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Isabell Herlovsen 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Nilla Fischer 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Hedvig Lindahl 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Caroline Seger 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Carli Lloyd 442007, 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Kátia 43(1995), 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Maureen Mmadu 431995, (1999), 2003, 2007
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Andréia 43(1999), 2003, 2007, 2011
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Erin McLeod 43(2003), 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Faith Michael 43(2003), 2007, 2011, 2019
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Clare Polkinghorne 432007, 2011, (2015), 2019
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Lydia Williams 43(2007), 2011, 2015, 2019
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Rumi Utsugi 432007, 2011, 2015, (2019)
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Nozomi Yamago 421999, 2003, (2007), (2011)
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Mizuho Sakaguchi 42(2007), 2011, 2015, (2019)
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Bárbara 41(2007), (2011), (2015), 2019
  1. Name in bold indicates a player still active at club level.
  2. Number of finals tournaments in which the player was part of the squad.
  3. Number of finals tournaments in which the player played in at least one match.
  4. Tournaments in round brackets: e.g., (1991): Part of the squad for the tournament, but did not play

Matches

The following players earned caps in at least 18 matches, which requires appearances at a minimum of three World Cup tournaments. [8]

TeamPlayer [o 1] Matches [o 2] Tournaments
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Kristine Lilly 301991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Abby Wambach 252003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Julie Foudy 241991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Formiga 241995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Homare Sawa 241995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Birgit Prinz 241995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Joy Fawcett 231991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Mia Hamm 231991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Bente Nordby 221991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Hege Riise 221991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Bettina Wiegmann 221991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Sun Wen 201991, 1995, 1999, 2003
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Briana Scurry 191995, 1999, 2003, 2007
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Christie Rampone 191999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Solveig Gulbrandsen 191999, 2003, 2007, 2015
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Carla Overbeck 181991, 1995, 1999
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Tiffeny Milbrett 181995, 1999, 2003
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Therese Sjögran 182003, 2007, 2011, 2015
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Carli Lloyd 182007, 2011, 2015
  1. Name in bold indicates a player still active in international football.
  2. Number of finals matches the player entered the field, not counting those as an unused substitute.

See also

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References

  1. "Brazil star Formiga sets seven-up World Cup record". 9 June 2019.
  2. Kassouf, Jeff. "Sawa makes Japan roster for record 6th World Cup – Equalizer Soccer".
  3. 1 2 3 http://www.soccerwire.com/news/nt/international-women/u-s-wnt-wraps-up-world-cup-send-off-series-tonight-vs-korea-republic/
  4. 1 2 3 "Ellis Names U.S. Roster for 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Team". www.ussoccer.com.
  5. Goldberg, Jamie (24 May 2015). "Portland Thorns goalkeeper Nadine Angerer officially named to Germany's World Cup roster". oregonlive.com.
  6. http://glenncrooks.sportsblog.com/posts/2271028/leblanc-earns-fifth-world-cup.html
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 "Teenagers turned veterans: Five Football Ferns set to play at their fourth World Cu". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  8. "FIFA Women's World Cup Record: Players". FIFA.com. Retrieved 21 June 2014.