List of popular music genres

Last updated

This is a list of the commercially relevant genres in modern popular music. Applicable styles are classified in this list using AllMusic [1] genre categorization. Popular music is defined as music with wide appeal. [2]

AllMusic online music guide service website

AllMusic is an online database music website. It catalogs more than 3 million album entries and 30 million tracks, as well as information on artists and bands. It was launched in 1991, predating the World Wide Web.

Contents

By regions

African

Afrobeat is a music genre which involves the combination of elements of West African musical styles such as fuji music and highlife with American funk and jazz influences, with a focus on chanted vocals, complex intersecting rhythms, and percussion.

Hip hop music has been popular in Africa since the early 1980s due to widespread American influence. In 1985 hip hop reached Senegal, a French-speaking country in West Africa. Some of the first Senegalese rappers were M.C. Lida, M.C. Solaar, and Positive Black Soul, who mixed rap with Mbalax, a type of West African pop music. An early South African group was Black Noise. They began as a graffiti and breakdance crew in Cape Town until they started emceeing in 1989.

African heavy metal refers to the heavy metal music scene in Africa, particularly in the Central African, Western African and Southern African countries including Namibia, Zambia, Madagascar, Zimbabwe Uganda, Angola, Botswana, South Africa, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe. It also extends into North African nations such as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia, although bands in the North African region associate themselves more closely with the MENA region in terms of cultural and social consistencies. In South Africa, particular regional scenes are found in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Pretoria and Port Elizabeth. There is also emerging scenes in Gabon, Nigeria, Cape Verde and Ghana with Iron Sliver, 1 Last Autograph, Krad and Dark Suburb leading their respective scenes.

Asian

East Asian

Anime Japanese animation

Anime is hand-drawn and computer animation originating from or associated with Japan.

Image song song related to a fictional work, sung in-character

An image song or character song is a song on a tie-in single or album for an anime, game, dorama, manga, or commercial product that is sometimes sung by the voice actor or actor of a character, in character. It is meant to give a sense of the personality of the character.

C-pop music genre by artists originating from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan

C-pop is an abbreviation for Chinese popular music, a loosely defined musical genre by artists originating from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Others come from countries where the Chinese language is used by a large number of the population, such as Singapore and Malaysia. C-pop is sometimes used as an umbrella term covering not only Chinese pop but also R&B, ballads, Chinese rock, Chinese hip hop and Chinese ambient music, although Chinese rock branched off as a separate genre during the early 1990s.

South Asian

Asian Underground is a term associated with various British Asian and South Asian Canadian musicians who blend elements of Western underground dance music and the traditional Asian music of their home countries in South Asia. The first well-known mention was the compilation album Anokha - Soundz of the Asian Underground released in 1997 and masterminded by Talvin Singh and Sweety Kapoor. It is not a strict musical genre per se, since the specific sounds can vary wildly. Most of these artists are the children or grandchildren of immigrants and have grown up in Western culture, but still have a strong Asian background through their families.

Baila is a form of music, popular in Sri Lanka. The genre originated centuries ago among the 'Sri Lankan Kaffirs' or Afro-Sri Lankan communities. Baila songs are played during parties and weddings in Sri Lanka, Goa and Mangalore accompanied by dancing.

Baul intangible cultural heritage

Baul or Bauls are a group of mystic minstrels from the Bengal region of South Asia, which includes Bangladesh and the Indian states of West Bengal, Tripura and Assam's Barak Valley. Bauls constitute both a syncretic religious sect and a musical tradition. Bauls are a very heterogeneous group, with many sects, but their membership mainly consists of Vaishnava Hindus and Sufi Muslims. They can often be identified by their distinctive clothes and musical instruments. Lalon Shah is regarded as the most celebrated Baul saint in history.

Southeast Asian

Campursari in Indonesian refers to a crossover of several contemporary Indonesian music genres, mainly Javanese Langgam Jawa and Dangdut. The word campursari was coined from the Javanese language, and literally means "mixture of essences". Campursari music is popular and prevalent within the Javanese cultural sphere, especially Central Java, Yogyakarta and East Java; and also in some regions where Javanese immigrants were abundant, such as parts of Greater Jakarta, Lampung or even Suriname. It is related to the modification of several musical instruments like gamelan combined with western musical instruments such as guitar and keyboard. The combination thus ends up with the western instruments to be dominated by the traditional Javanese instruments according to the local taste of langgam Jawa and gending.

Dangdut genre of Indonesian folk and traditional popular music

Dangdut is a genre of Indonesian folk and traditional popular music that is partly derived from Hindustani and Arabic music. Dangdut is a very popular genre in Indonesia because of its melodious instrumentation and vocals. Indonesians dance in somewhat similar to the ghoomar while listening to dangdut music, but in a much slower version. Dangdut features a tabla and gendang beat.

Indo pop Dangdut

Indo-pop also known as Indonesian pop is loosely defined as Indonesian pop music; however, in a wider sense it can also encompass Indonesian pop culture, which also includes Indonesian cinema and sinetrons.

Genres

Afro


Avant-garde

Experimental music is a general label for any music that pushes existing boundaries and genre definitions. Experimental compositional practice is defined broadly by exploratory sensibilites radically opposed to, and questioning of, institutionalized compositional, performing, and aesthetic conventions in music. Elements of experimental music include indeterminate music, in which the composer introduces the elements of chance or unpredictability with regard to either the composition or its performance. Artists may also approach a hybrid of disparate styles or incorporate unorthodox and unique elements.

Lo-fi music music aesthetic

Lo-fi is an aesthetic of recorded music in which the sound quality is lower than the usual contemporary standards and imperfections of the recording and production are audible. These standards have evolved throughout the decades, meaning that some older examples of lo-fi may not have been originally recognized as such. Lo-fi only began to be recognized as a style of popular music in the 1990s, when it became alternately referred to as DIY music.

Musique concrète is a form of musique expérimentale that exploits acousmatic listening, meaning sound identities can often be intentionally obscured or appear unconnected to their source cause. It can feature sounds derived from recordings of musical instruments, the human voice, and the natural environment as well as those created using synthesizers and computer-based digital signal processing. Compositions in this idiom are not restricted to the normal musical rules of melody, harmony, rhythm, metre, and so on. Originally contrasted with "pure" elektronische Musik, the theoretical basis of musique concrète as a compositional practice was developed by Pierre Schaeffer, beginning in the early 1940s. From the late 1960s onward, and particularly in France, the term acousmatic music started to be used in reference to fixed media compositions that utilized both musique concrète based techniques and live sound spatialisation.

Blues

Caribbean and Caribbean-influenced

Comedy

Country

Easy listening

Electronic

Folk

Hip hop

Jazz

Latin

Pop

R&B and soul

Rock

Exclusions

Genres or styles that are not contemporary or commercially marketed in substantial numbers have been excluded, as follows:

Related Research Articles

The music of the United States reflects the country's pluri-ethnic population through a diverse array of styles. It is a mixture of music influenced by West African, Irish, Scottish and mainland European cultures among others. The country's most internationally renowned genres are jazz, blues, country, bluegrass, rock, rhythm and blues, soul, ragtime, hip hop, barbershop, pop, experimental, techno, house, dance, boogaloo, and salsa. The United States has the world's largest music market with a total retail value of 4,898.3 million dollars in 2014, and its music is heard around the world. Since the beginning of the 20th century, some forms of American popular music have gained a near global audience.

Illinois, including Chicago, has a wide musical heritage. Chicago is most famously associated with the development of electric blues music. Chicago was also a center of development for early jazz and later for house music, and includes a vibrant hip hop scene and R&B. Chicago also has a thriving rock scene that spans the breadth of the rock genre, from huge stadium-filling arena-rock bands to small local indie bands. Chicago has had a significant historical impact on the development of many rock subgenres including power pop, punk rock, indie rock, emo rock, pop punk, and alternative rock.

African-American music musical traditions in the American context

African-American music is an umbrella term covering a diverse range of music and musical genres largely developed by African Americans. Their origins are in musical forms that arose out of the historical condition of slavery that characterized the lives of African Americans prior to the American Civil War.

Popular music of the United Kingdom in the 1980s built on the post-punk and new wave movements, incorporating different sources of inspiration from subgenres and what is now classed as world music in the shape of Jamaican and Indian music. It also explored the consequences of new technology and social change in the electronic music of synthpop. In the early years of the decade, while subgenres like heavy metal music continued to develop separately, there was a considerable crossover between rock and more commercial popular music, with a large number of more "serious" bands, like The Police and UB40, enjoying considerable single chart success. The advent of MTV and cable video helped spur what has been seen as a Second British Invasion in the early years of the decade, with British bands enjoying more success in America than they had since the height of the Beatles' popularity in the 1960s. However, by the end of the decade a fragmentation has been observed, with many new forms of music and sub-cultures, including Hip Hop and House music, while the single charts were once again dominated by pop artists, now often associated with the Hi-NRG hit factory of Stock Aitken Waterman. The rise of the Indie rock scene was partly a response to this, and marked a shift away from the major music labels and towards the importance of local scenes like Madchester and subgenres, like gothic rock.

Electro is a genre of electronic music and early hip hop directly influenced by the use of the Roland TR-808 drum machines, and funk. Records in the genre typically feature drum machines and heavy electronic sounds, usually without vocals, although if vocals are present they are delivered in a deadpan manner, often through electronic distortion such as vocoding and talkboxing. This is the main distinction between electro and previously prominent genres such as disco, in which the electronic sound was only part of the instrumentation. It also palpably deviates from its predecessor boogie for being less vocal-oriented and more focused on electronic beats produced by drum machines.

The music history of the United States includes many styles of folk, popular and classical music. Some of the best-known genres of American music are blues, rock and roll, and country. The history began with the Native Americans, the first people to populate North America. The music of these people was highly varied in form, and was mostly religious in purpose.

Dance music music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing

Dance music is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing. It can be either a whole musical piece or part of a larger musical arrangement. In terms of performance, the major categories are live dance music and recorded dance music. While there exist attestations of the combination of dance and music in ancient times, the earliest Western dance music that we can still reproduce with a degree of certainty are the surviving medieval dances. In the Baroque period, the major dance styles were noble court dances. In the classical music era, the minuet was frequently used as a third movement, although in this context it would not accompany any dancing. The waltz also arose later in the classical era. Both remained part of the romantic music period, which also saw the rise of various other nationalistic dance forms like the barcarolle, mazurka, ecossaise, ballade and polonaise.

RauteMusik.FM radio station

RauteMusik is an internet radio station based in Germany. RauteMusik was first broadcast on 20 April 2003 with just one main stream. In the next four years, RauteMusik established itself as one of Europe's biggest internet radio stations. Currently up to 37,000 people listen to RauteMusik simultaneously.

This is a list of lists of musicians.

References

Bibliography

  1. Allmusic web site
  2. "Definition of "popular music" | Collins Englis Dictionary". www.collinsdictionary.com. Retrieved November 5, 2017.

Afro