List of sumo tournament top division runners-up

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The table below lists the runners up ( jun-yusho ) in the top makuuchi division at official sumo tournaments or honbasho since the six tournaments per year system was instituted in 1958. The runner up is determined by the wrestler(s) with the second highest win-loss score after fifteen bouts, held at a rate of one per day over the duration of the 15-day tournament. [1] Names in italics mark a jun-yusho performance by a maegashira or lower ranked wrestler. Figures in brackets mark the number of jun-yusho earned up to that tournament for wrestlers who were runner up more than once. Those with a P after their name means they were the runner up after a playoff.

JanuaryMarchMayJulySeptemberNovember
year
in sumo
Tokyo Osaka Tokyo Nagoya Tokyo Kyushu
2019 Takakeishō (2) Ichinojō (2) Kakuryū (7) Hakuhō (22)
Terutsuyoshi
Takakeishō P (3) Asanoyama
Shodai
2018 Takayasu (2) Takayasu (3)
Kaisei (2)
Tochinoshin (4) Yutakayama Gōeidō (7) Takayasu (4)
2017 Sōkokurai Terunofuji P (3) Terunofuji (4),
Tochinoshin (3)
Aoiyama Gōeidō P (6) Tamawashi
Takakeishō
Hokutōfuji
Okinoumi (3)
2016 Hakuhō (21)
Harumafuji (7)
Toyonoshima (5)
Kisenosato (9) Kisenosato (10) Kisenosato (11)
Takanoiwa
Endō Kisenosato (12)
2015 Harumafuji (5)
Kisenosato (7)
Tokushōryū
Terunofuji Hakuhō (19),
Harumafuji (6),
Kisenosato (8)
Kakuryū (6),
Yoshikaze
Terunofuji P (2) Hakuhō (20)
Ikioi
Shōhōzan
2014 Kakuryū (4) Hakuhō (18),
Harumafuji (4),
Gōeidō (4)
Kisenosato (6) Kotoshōgiku (3),
Gōeidō (5)
Ichinojō (1) Kakuryū (5)
2013 Hakuhō (16),
Takayasu
Okinoumi (2),
Takarafuji
Kisenosato (2) Kisenosato (3),
Kaisei
Kisenosato (4),
Gōeidō (3)
Hakuhō (17),
Kisenosato (5)
2012 Hakuhō (13),
Gagamaru
Kakuryū P (3) Tochiōzan P Hakuhō (14) Hakuhō (15) Gōeidō (2),
Toyonoshima (4)
2011 Kotoshōgiku ,
Gōeidō ,
Okinoumi
Tournament Cancelled Kakuryū (2),
Tochinoshin (2)
Hakuhō (12) Kotoshōgiku (2),
Kisenosato
Wakakōyū
2010 Hakuhō (11),
Baruto (3)
Baruto (4) Aran Aran (2),
Kakuryū ,
Hōmashō (3)
Takekaze Toyonoshima P (3)
2009 Hakuhō P (8) Asashōryū (8),
Hōmashō (2)
Hakuhō P (9) Kotoōshū (4) Hakuhō P (10) Miyabiyama (4),
Tochinoshin
2008 Asashōryū (6) Hakuhō (6),
Baruto (2),
Kokkai
Asashōryū (7),
Hakuhō (7),
Toyonoshima (2)
Kotomitsuki (8) Harumafuji (2) Harumafuji P (3)
2007 Toyonoshima Asashōryū (5) Kotomitsuki (6), ,
Dejima (2),
Asasekiryū (2)
Kotomitsuki (7) Kyokutenhō Chiyotaikai (7),
Baruto
2006 Hakuhō (3) Hakuhō (4) Miyabiyama P (3) Hakuhō (5) Harumafuji ,
Aminishiki (2)
Hōmashō
2005 Tochiazuma (5),
Hakuhō (2)
Tamanoshima (2) Kotomitsuki (5) Kotoōshū Kotoōshū P (2) Chiyotaikai (6),
Kotoōshū (3),
Tochinohana
2004 Kotomitsuki (4) Chiyotaikai (5),
Kaiō (10),
Asasekiryū
Hokutōriki P (3) Miyabiyama (2) Tochinonada (2),
Kyokushūzan (2)
Kaiō (11),
Hakuhō
2003 Wakanosato ,
Dejima ,
Tochinonada
Asashōryū (3),
Kaiō (8),
Hokutōriki (2),
Kyokushūzan
Kaiō (9),
Aminishiki
Chiyotaikai (3) Chiyotaikai (4),
Wakanosato (2),
Kotomitsuki (3),
Iwakiyama
Asashōryū (4)
2002 Chiyotaikai P Kaiō (5) Asashōryū (2),
Chiyotaikai (2),
Kaiō (6),
Hokutōriki
Asashōryū Takanohana II (16),
Kaiō (7),
Kotomitsuki (2)
Takanowaka
2001 Musashimaru P (11) Takanohana II (15),
Musashimaru (12),
Musōyama (4)
Musashimaru P (13) Musashimaru (14),
Tamanoshima
Tochiazuma (3) Tochiazuma (4)
2000 Takanohana II (13),
Miyabiyama
Akebono (11),
Musōyama (3)
Akebono (12),
Takanohana II (14)
Tochiazuma (2) Akebono (13) Kotomitsuki
1999 Wakanohana III P (9) Takanonami (8) Kaiō (3) Akebono P (10) Akinoshima (2) Takanohana II (12),
Kaiō (4)
1998 Tochiazuma Akebono (9) Takanonami (7),
Kotonishiki (4)
Musashimaru (10) Wakanohana III (8) Takanohana II (11),
Tosanoumi
1997 Takanohana II (8) Akebono P (7),
Musashimaru P (8),
Kaiō P (2)
Takanohana II P (9) Akebono (8) Musashimaru P (9) Takanohana II P (10)
1996 Takanohana II P (7) Wakanohana III (4),
Musōyama (2)
Wakanohana III (5),
Takanonami (4)
Akebono (5),
Takanonami (5)
Musashimaru (7),
Wakanohana III (6),
Takatōriki (2)
Akebono P (6),
Wakanohana III P (7),
Takanonami P (6),
Kaiō P
1995 Musashimaru P (5) Takanohana II (5) Akebono (3) Musashimaru (6) Akebono (4) Takanohana II P (6)
1994 Takanonami Takanonami P (2),
Takatōriki P
Musashimaru (3) Wakanohana III (3) Musōyama Musashimaru (4),
Takanonami (3)
1993 Daishoyama Takanohana II (2) Akebono (2) Takanohana II P (3),
Wakanohana III P (2)
Takanohana II (4) Musashimaru P (2)
1992 Akebono Kirishima (6),
Tochinowaka ,
Akinoshima
Wakanohana III Musashimaru (2),
Kirishima (7)
Kotonishiki (2),
Daishōhō
Kotonishiki (3)
1991 Hokutoumi (8) Ōnokuni (7),
Takanohana II
Konishiki II P (8) Konishiki II (9) Kirishima (5) Kotonishiki
1990 Hokutoumi (7),
Kirishima (2)
Konishiki II P (7),
Kirishima P (3)
Chiyonofuji (10) Chiyonofuji (11) Asahifuji (8),
Kirishima (4)
Asahifuji (9)
1989 Asahifuji P (5) Asahifuji (6) Asahifuji P (7) Hokutoumi P (5) Hokutoumi (6) Chiyonofuji (9)
1988 Konishiki II (6) Hokutoumi P (4) Asahifuji (2) Ōnokuni (6) Asahifuji (3) Asahifuji (4)
1987 Futahaguro P (6) Chiyonofuji (8) Hokutoumi (2),
Konishiki II (5)
Ōnokuni (4) Ōnokuni (5) Hokutoumi (3),
Futahaguro (7)
1986 Ōnokuni (3) Konishiki II (3),
Mitoizumi (2)
Futahaguro (3) Futahaguro P (4) Hokutoumi ,
Konishiki II (4)
Futahaguro (5),
Kirishima
1985 Hokuten'yū (3),
Dewanohana ,
Mitoizumi
Wakashimazu (6) Konishiki II (2) Ōnokuni ,
Futahaguro
Ōnokuni (2) Futahaguro (2),
Hokuten'yū (4)
1984 Chiyonofuji (6),
Asahifuji
Hokuten'yū (2) Chiyonofuji (7),
Takanosato (8)
Kitanoumi (16) Konishiki II Wakashimazu (5)
1983 Asashio IV P (3),
Hokuten'yū
Takanosato (5),
Asashio IV (4)
Takanosato (6),
Wakashimazu (4)
Chiyonofuji (4) Chiyonofuji (5) Takanosato (7)
1982 Chiyonofuji (3),
Takanosato (3),
Wakashimazu
Kitanoumi (15),
Wakanohana II (12),
Takanosato (4),
Kirinji (2)
Asashio IV P (2) Wakanohana II (13),
Kotokaze (2),
Daijuyama ,
Kōbōyama
Wakashimazu (2) Wakashimazu (3)
1981 Kitanoumi P (13) Chiyonofuji ,
Ōzutsu
Chiyonofuji (2) Kitanoumi (14) Wakanohana II (11) Asashio IV P
1980 Kitanoumi (12),
Masuiyama II (2),
Kotokaze
Wakanohana II (8) Wakanohana II (9),
Kaneshiro (2)
Takanosato Takanosato (2) Wakanohana II (10)
1979 Kaneshiro Wajima (14),
Wakanohana II (5)
Kitanoumi (11),
Mienoumi (4)
Mienoumi P (5) Wakanohana II (6),
Mienoumi (6)
Wakanohana II (7)
1978 Wakanohana II Wakanohana II P (2) Wakanohana II P (3) Wajima (12) Wakanohana II (4),
Kirinji
Wajima (13)
1977 Kitanoumi (7),
Takanohana I (3)
Takanohana I (4) Kitanoumi (8) Kitanoumi (9) Asahikuni (4) Kitanoumi (10)
1976 Wajima (8),
Asahikuni (2),
Washūyama (2)
Asahikuni P (3) Wajima P (9) Kitanoumi (6) Wajima (10) Wajima (11)
1975 Kaiketsu (4) Kitanoumi P (3) Kaiketsu (5) Aobajō Kitanoumi P (4) Kitanoumi (5)
1974 Wajima (7) Asahikuni Masuiyama II Kitanoumi P Mienoumi (3) Kitanoumi P (2)
1973 Wajima (5),
Mienoumi (2),
Kaiketsu (3)
Wajima (6) Kiyokuni (4),
Daiju ,
Tochiazuma (3),
Washūyama
Kitanofuji P (4) Kiyokuni (5),
Ōnishiki
Kotozakura (3),
Kurohimeyama (2)
1972 Kotozakura (2),
Wajima (2),
Hasegawa (2),
Fukunohana (2),
Wakafutase
Kaiketsu Daikirin (4),
Takanohana I ,
Kaiketsu (2)
Takanohana I (2) Wajima (3) Wajima (4),
Fukunohana (3)
1971 Tamanoumi P (10) Taihō (12) Tamanoumi (11),
Kiyokuni (3)
Daikirin (3) Tamanoumi (12) Mienoumi ,
Wajima ,
Fujizakura ,
Kurohimeyama
1970 Tamanoumi P (7) Taihō (10),
Tamanoumi (8),
Kitanofuji (3)
Tamanoumi (9),
Maenoyama
Maenoyama (2) Ryūko (3) Taihō P (11)
1969 Tamanoumi (6) Ryūko Kiyokuni (2) Fujinokawa P (2) Kitanofuji (2) Daikirin (2),
Ryūko (2)
1968 Tamanoumi (3) Tamanoumi (4),
Yutakayama (7),
Daikirin
Yutakayama (8),
Kitanofuji ,
Fujinokawa ,
Tochiazuma
Mutsuarashi (2) Myōbudani (4),
Tochiazuma (2)
Tamanoumi (5)
1967 Sadanoyama (9) Taihō (8),
Mutsuarashi
Kashiwado (14),
Hasegawa
Kotozakura ,
Wakanami
Sadanoyama (10) Kashiwado (15),
Taihō (9),
Tamanoumi (2),
Fukunohana
1966 Tamanoumi Kōtetsuyama Kashiwado (11) Kashiwado (12) Kashiwado P (13) Kōtetsuyama (2)
1965 Wakasugiyama Sadanoyama (6) Yutakayama (6),
Maedagawa (2),
Myōbudani (2)
Kashiwado (10),
Sadanoyama (7)
Sadanoyama P (8),
Myōbudani P (3)
Wakamisugi (2)
1964 Kiyokuni Kashiwado (9) Kitabayama (3) Yutakayama (5) Sadanoyama (4) Sadanoyama (5)
1963 Yutakayama (3) Tochihikari (4) Yutakayama (4) Sadanoyama P (3) Taihō (6) Taihō (7),
Kainoyama
1962 Yutakayama Taihō P (5) Tochihikari (2),
Sadanoyama
Kashiwado (7),
Tochihikari (3),
Tsurugamine (2)
Sadanoyama P (2) Kashiwado (8),
Yutakayama (2),
Wakamisugi
1961 Wakanohana I (7),
Kotogahama (5)
Kashiwado (4),
Taihō (3),
Maedagawa
Taihō (4),
Kitabayama (2),
Hagurohana
Asashio III (3) Kashiwado P (5),
Myōbudani P
Kashiwado (6)
1960 Taihō Tochinishiki (9) Wakanohana I (6),
Wakachichibu (2)
Iwakaze Kashiwado (3),
Taihō (2)
Wakahaguro (3)
1959 Asashio III ,
Kitabayama
Asashio III (2),
Kashiwado
Tochinishiki P (6) Kotogahama (4),
Fujinishiki
Tochinishiki (7),
Wakahaguro (2),
Kashiwado (2)
Tochinishiki (8),
Haguroyama ,
Tamanoumi (2),
Fujinishiki (2)
1958 Chiyonoyama (5) Kotogahama (3) Chiyonoyama (6) Tochinishiki (5) Tokitsuyama (5),
Wakachichibu
Wakanohana I (5)

See also

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References

  1. "Rules of Sumo: Tournament". Nihon Sumo Kyokai. Archived from the original on 2007-06-01. Retrieved 2007-06-05.