List of tropical storms named Rumbia

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The name Rumbia has been used to name four tropical cyclones in the western north Pacific Ocean. The name was submitted by Malaysia and refers to the Sago Palm.

Due to the extensive damage and high death toll in South China caused by the 2018 storm, the name Rumbia was retired by the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee in February 2019. It was replaced with Pulasan for future seasons, which comes from Malay word pulas means (twist). Pulasan fruit is popular in Southeast Asia for its juicy and sweet taste.

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The name Hanna or Hannah has been used for eleven tropical cyclones worldwide: five in the Atlantic Ocean and six in the Western Pacific Ocean. Hanna has also been used for one extratropical European windstorm.

The name Karen has been used for seventeen tropical cyclones worldwide: six in the Atlantic Ocean, nine in the Western Pacific Ocean, one in the South-West Indian Ocean, and one in the Australian region.

The name Betty has been used for a total of twenty tropical cyclones worldwide: one in the Atlantic Ocean, two in the South Pacific Ocean, one in the South-West Indian Ocean, and sixteen in the Western Pacific Ocean.

The name Nina has been used for thirteen typhoons in the northwest Pacific Ocean, one tropical cyclone in the northeast Pacific Ocean, and one tropical cyclone in the southwest Pacific.

The name Banyan has been used to name three tropical cyclones in the Western North Pacific Ocean. The name was contributed by Hong Kong and refers to Ficus microcarpa, a type of tree commonly seen in Southeast China.

The name Gorio has been used for six tropical cyclones in the Philippines by PAGASA in the Western Pacific Ocean.

The name Agnes has been used for a total of sixteen tropical cyclones worldwide: one in the Atlantic Ocean, thirteen in the Western North Pacific Ocean, one in the South-West Indian Ocean, and one in the South Pacific Ocean. The name Agnes was retired in the Atlantic after this the 1972 hurricane season.

The name Cimaron has been used to name four tropical cyclones in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The name was submitted by the Philippines and refers to a type of wild ox.

The name Usagi has been used to name four tropical cyclones in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The name was contributed by Japan and is the Japanese name of the constellation Lepus.

The name Helen or Hellen has been used for twenty tropical cyclones worldwide: sixteen in the Western Pacific Ocean, one in the North Indian Ocean, one in the South-West Indian Ocean, and two in the Australian region.

The name Rose has been used for twelve tropical cyclones worldwide, including once in the Atlantic, ten in the northwest Pacific Ocean and once in the southwest Indian Ocean.

The name Kim has been used for eight tropical cyclones in the northwest Pacific Ocean.

The name Goring has been used for 13 tropical cyclones in the Philippines by PAGASA in the Western Pacific.

The name Neneng has been used for thirteen tropical cyclones in the Philippines by PAGASA in the Western Pacific.

The name Caloy has been used to name five tropical cyclones in the Philippine Area of Responsibility by PAGASA in the Western Pacific Ocean.

The name Olive has been used for a total of eleven tropical cyclones worldwide: one in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, nine in the Western Pacific Ocean, and one in the Southwest Indian Ocean.

Tropical Storm Rumbia (2013)

Severe Tropical Storm Rumbia, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Gorio, was a tropical cyclone that brought widespread flooding in areas of the Philippines and China late June and early July 2013. The sixth internationally named storm of the season, Rumbia formed from a broad area of low pressure situated in the southern Philippine Sea on June 27. Steadily organizing, the initial tropical depression moved towards the northwest as the result of a nearby subtropical ridge. On June 28, the disturbance strengthened to tropical storm strength, and subsequently made its first landfall on Eastern Samar in the Philippines early the following day. Rumbia spent roughly a day moving across the archipelago before emerging into the South China Sea. Over open waters, Rumbia resumed strengthening, and reached its peak intensity with winds of 95 km/h (50 mph) on July 1, ranking it as a severe tropical storm. The tropical cyclone weakened slightly before moving ashore the Leizhou Peninsula late that day. Due to land interaction, Rumbia quickly weakened into a low pressure area on July 2 and eventually dissipated soon afterwards.

The name Leepi has been used to name two tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific Ocean. The name was submitted by Laos and means, the most beautiful waterfall in the end of Southern of Lao.