Lithium oxalate

Last updated
Lithium oxalate
Lithium oxalate.svg
Names
Other names
Dilithium oxalate, di-Lithium oxalate, [1] oxalic acid dilithium salt [2]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.008.232 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
EC Number
  • 209-054-1
PubChem CID
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C2H2O4-C.2Li/c3-1(4)2(5)6;;/h(H,3,4)(H,5,6);;/q;2*+1/p-2
    Key: YNQRWVCLAIUHHI-UHFFFAOYSA-L
  • [Li+].[Li+].[O-]C(=O)C([O-])=O
Properties
C
2
Li
2
O
4
Molar mass 102.0 g/mol
AppearanceColorless crystalline solid
Density 2.12 g/cm3
6.6g/100g water
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS-pictogram-exclam.svg
Warning
H302, H312
P264, P270, P280, P301+P312, P302+P352, P312, P322, P330, P363, P501
Related compounds
Related compounds
Calcium oxalate
Sodium oxalate
Magnesium oxalate
Strontium oxalate
Barium oxalate
Potassium oxalate
Beryllium oxalate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Lithium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of lithium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C
2
Li
2
O
4
. [3] [4] Lithium oxalate is soluble in water and converts to the oxide when heated. [5]

Contents

Synthesis

One of the methods of synthesis is the reaction of direct neutralization of oxalic acid with lithium hydroxide:

Properties

The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, cell parameters a = 3.400, b = 5.156, c = 9.055 Å, β = 95.60°, Z = 4. [3]

Lithium oxalate decomposes when heated:

Applications

In pyrotechnics, the compound is used to color the flame red. [6]

Related Research Articles

A 1,2-Wittig rearrangement is a categorization of chemical reactions in organic chemistry, and consists of a 1,2-rearrangement of an ether with an alkyllithium compound. The reaction is named for Nobel Prize winning chemist Georg Wittig.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Barium oxalate</span> Chemical compound

Barium oxalate (BaC2O4), a barium salt of oxalic acid, is a white odorless powder that is sometimes used as a green pyrotechnic colorant generally in specialized pyrotechnic compositions containing magnesium metal powder. Flame color is rich and vivid without additional chlorine donors. Such compositions burn rate is satisfied without commonly used oxidizers as nitrates, chlorates and perchlorates.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dimethyl oxalate</span> Chemical compound

Dimethyl oxalate is the organic compound with the formula (CO2CH3)2. It is the dimethyl ester of oxalic acid. Dimethyl oxalate is a colorless or white solid that is soluble in water.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lithium cobalt oxide</span> Chemical compound

Lithium cobalt oxide, sometimes called lithium cobaltate or lithium cobaltite, is a chemical compound with formula LiCoO
2
. The cobalt atoms are formally in the +3 oxidation state, hence the IUPAC name lithium cobalt(III) oxide.

The borate oxalates are chemical compounds containing borate and oxalate anions. Where the oxalate group is bound to the borate via oxygen, a more condensed anion is formed that balances less cations. These can be termed boro-oxalates, bis(oxalato)borates, or oxalatoborates or oxalate borates. The oxalatoborates are heterocyclic compounds with a ring containing -O-B-O-. Bis(oxalato)borates are spiro compounds with rings joined at the boron atom.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Beryllium oxalate</span> Chemical compound

Beryllium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of beryllium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C
2
BeO
4
. It forms colorless crystals, dissolves in water, and also forms crystalline hydrates. The compound is used to prepare ultra-pure beryllium oxide by thermal decomposition.

Praseodymium(III) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of praseodymium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C6O12Pr2. The compound forms light green crystals, insoluble in water, also forms crystalline hydrates.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Copper oxalate</span> Chemical compound

Copper oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of copper metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula CuC
2
O
4
. The compound is practically insoluble in water, alcohol, ether, and acetic acid but soluble in ammonium hydroxide. Copper oxalate forms a hydrate, which forms acid-blue crystals.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Praseodymium(IV) fluoride</span> Chemical compound

Praseodymium(IV) fluoride (also praseodymium tetrafluoride) is a binary inorganic compound, a highly oxidised metal salt of praseodymium and fluoride with the chemical formula PrF4. It forms light yellow crystals.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Yttrium oxalate</span> Chemical compound

Yttrium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of yttrium and oxalic acid with the chemical formula Y2(C2O4)3. The compound does not dissolve in water and forms crystalline hydrates—colorless crystals.

Manganese oxalate is a chemical compound, a salt of manganese and oxalic acid with the chemical formula MnC
2
O
4
. The compound creates light pink crystals, does not dissolve in water, and forms crystalline hydrates. It occurs naturally as the mineral Lindbergite.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tin(II) oxalate</span> Chemical compound

Tin(II) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of tin and oxalic acid with the chemical formula SnC
2
O
4
. The compound looks like colorless crystals, does not dissolve in water, and forms crystalline hydrates.

Neptunium (IV) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of neptunium and oxalic acid with the chemical formula Np(C2O4)2. The compound is slightly soluble in water, forms crystalline hydrates—green crystals.

Samarium(III) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of samarium and oxalic acid with the formula Sm2(C2O4)3. The compound does not dissolve in water, forms a crystalline hydrate with yellow crystals.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Actinium(III) nitrate</span> Chemical compound

Actinium (III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, actinium salt of nitric acid with the chemical formula Ac(NO3)3. The compound looks like white substance, readily soluble in water.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dysprosium(III) nitrate</span> Chemical compound

Dysprosium(III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of dysprosium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Dy(NO3)3. The compound forms yellowish crystals, dissolves in water, forms a crystalline hydrate.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Holmium(III) nitrate</span> Chemical compound

Holmium (III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of holmium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Ho(NO3)3. The compound forms yellowish crystals, dissolves in water, also forms crystalline hydrates.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ytterbium(III) nitrate</span> Chemical compound

Ytterbium (III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of ytterbium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Yb(NO3)3. The compound forms colorless crystals, dissolves in water, and also forms crystalline hydrates.

Lutetium(III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of lutetium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Lu(NO3)3. The compound forms colorless crystals, dissolves in water, and also forms crystalline hydrates. The compound is poisonous.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lithium lactate</span> Chemical compound

Lithium lactate is a chemical compound, a salt of lithium and lactic acid with the formula CH3CH(OH)COOLi, an amorphous solid, very soluble in water.

References

  1. "553-91-3 | Sigma-Aldrich". Sigma Aldrich . Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  2. "di-Lithium oxalate". Merck Millipore . Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  3. 1 2 Beagley, B.; Small, R. W. H. (1964-06-10). "The structure of lithium oxalate". Acta Crystallographica . 17 (6): 783–788. doi:10.1107/S0365110X64002079 . Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  4. Solchenbach, Sophie; Wetjen, Morten; Pritzl, Daniel; Schwenke, K. Uta; Gasteiger, Hubert A. (2018). "Lithium Oxalate as Capacity and Cycle-Life Enhancer in LNMO/Graphite and LNMO/SiG Full Cells". Journal of the Electrochemical Society . 165 (3): A512–A524. doi:10.1149/2.0611803jes. S2CID   104199908 . Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  5. "Lithium Oxalate". Millipore-Sigma . Retrieved 10 Feb 2022.
  6. Koch, Ernst-Christian (2009). Is it possible to Obtain a Deep Red Pyrotechnic Flame Based on Lithium?. 36th International Pyrotechnics Seminar. doi:10.13140/2.1.1657.0567 . Retrieved 15 June 2021.