Lodi (Pashtun tribe)

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Lodi is a sub-group of the Ghilzai tribe of Pashtuns who live in Afghanistan and Pakistan. [1] The Lodhi have also many sub-tribe i.e Niazi , Marwat, Daulat Khel, Mian Khel Bluch, Sur, Dotani, Khaisor and Tattor. [2]

The Shiekh Hamid Lodhi founded the first Pushtun dynasty in India in 960AD. Later The second Pashtun Lodi dynasty [3] that ruled the Delhi Sultanate from 1451 to 1526. It was the last dynasty of the Sultanate, and was founded by Bahlul Khan Lodi. [4]

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Lodi may refer to:

Delhi Sultanate Indian Islamic dynasties based in Delhi (1206–1526)

The Delhi Sultanate was an Islamic empire based in Delhi that stretched over large parts of the Indian subcontinent for 320 years (1206–1526). Five dynasties ruled over the Delhi Sultanate sequentially: the Mamluk dynasty (1206–1290), the Khalji dynasty (1290–1320), the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414), the Sayyid dynasty (1414–1451), and the Lodi dynasty (1451–1526). It covered large swathes of territory in modern-day India, Pakistan, Bangladesh as well as some parts of southern Nepal.

Ibrahim Lodhi 31st Sultan of the Delhi Sultanate (1517-26) and 3rd from the Lodi dynasty

Ibrahim Khan Lodhi was the last Sultan of the Delhi Sultanate, who became Sultan in 1517 after the death of his father Sikandar Lodhi. He was the last ruler of the Lodi dynasty, reigning for nine years until 1526, when he was defeated and killed at the Battle of Panipat by Babur's invading army, giving way to the emergence of the Mughal Empire in India.

Sikandar Lodi Sultan of Delhi

Sikandar Lodi, born Nizam Khan, was an Pashtun Sultan of the Delhi Sultanate between 1489 and 1517. He became the next ruler of the Lodi dynasty after the death of his father Bahlul Lodi in July 1489.The second and most successful ruler of the Lodi dynasty of the Delhi sultanate, he was also a poet of the Persian language and prepared a diwan of 9000 verses.

Bahlul Lodi Buhlool Shah Ghazi

Buhlool Khan Lodi was the chief of the Pashtun Lodi tribe. Founder of the Lodi dynasty from the Delhi Sultanate upon the abdication of the last claimant from the previous Sayyid rule. Bahlul became sultan of the dynasty on 19 April 1451.

Lodi dynasty Afghan dynasty ruling the Delhi Sultanate in northern India (1451-1526)

The Lodi dynasty was an Afghan dynasty that ruled the Delhi Sultanate from 1451 to 1526. It was the fifth and final dynasty of the Delhi Sultanate, and was founded by Bahlul Khan Lodi when he replaced the Sayyid dynasty.

Ghilji Pashtun tribe

The Ghiljī also spelled Khilji, Khalji, or Ghilzai or Ghilzay (غلزی), are one of the largest tribes of Pashtuns. Their traditional homeland is Ghazni and Qalati Ghilji in Afghanistan but have also settled in other regions, primarily, Pashtunistan which encompasses the Afghan-Pakistan frontier. The modern nomadic Kochi people are predominantly made up of Ghilji tribes. The Ghilji make up around 20-25% of Afghanistan's total population

Isa Khan Niazi Afghan noble of the Sur Dynasty

Isa Khan Niazi was a Pashtun noble in the courts of Sher Shah Suri and his son Islam Shah Suri, of the Sur dynasty, who fought the Mughal Empire.

The Pathans of Punjab (Punjabi: پنجابی پٹھان; Pashto: د پنجاب پښتانه‎; also called Punjabi Pathans are originally Pashtun people who have settled in the Punjab region of Pakistan. Most of these Pashtun communities are scattered throughout the Punjab and have over time assimilated into the Punjabi society and culture.

Pashtun tribes Large family units of the Eastern Iranian ethnic groups

The Pashtun tribes, historically also known as Afghan tribes, are the tribes of the Pashtun people, a large Eastern Iranian ethnic group who use the Pashto language and follow Pashtunwali code of conduct. They are found primarily in Afghanistan and Pakistan and form the world's largest tribal society, comprising over 49 million people and between 350 and 400 tribes and clans. They are traditionally divided into four tribal confederacies: the Sarbani (سړبني), the Bettani (بېټني), the Gharghashti (غرغښتي) and the Karlani (کرلاڼي).

Lodhi may refer to:

The Lohani, sometimes called Nuhani is a Pashtun tribe found in Pakistan especially in the region of Dera Ismail Khan, Tank, Lakki Marwat, Shakargarh, Haveli Lakha, Afghanistan and India. They were a mostly pastoral and migratory tribe but nowadays most of them have settled down in the plains of DI Khan, Tank and Lakki Marwat. Lohanis have four branches, Marwat, Daulat Khel, Miya Khel and Tatoor. The Tatoor tribe was crushed by Nadir shah and Daulat khel who brought them near to extinction. Therefore, nowadays Tatoor tribe is generally dispersed in the region of Tank, Dera Ismail khan and FR Tank and especially found in village Tatoor near Tank city.

Khel, also spelled as Khail, are sub-tribes of Pashtun tribes in Afghanistan and Pakistan. The title of the tribe ends in Zai and its sub-tribe name ends in Khel. Khel is also a common final element in the names of villages in Afghanistan and in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa of Pakistan, such as Darra Adam Khel.

The Afghans Pashtuns or Pathans have a large community in the Uttar Pradesh state in India, who form one of the largest Muslim communities in the state. They are also known as khans, which is a commonly used surname amongst them, although not all those who use the surname are Pathans, for example the Khanzada community of eastern Uttar Pradesh, who are muslim rajputs, are also commonly known as khan. Indeed, in Awadh, the boundary between the Khanzada and Pathans are blurred. In addition, the phrase Pathan Khanzada is used to describe muslim rajput groups, found mainly in Gorakhpur, who have been absorbed into the Pathan community. However, in Rohilkhand, and in parts of the Doab and Awadh, there are communities of partial Pashtuns ethnicities, such as the agricultural farmers community of Rohilla.

Kakazai

The Kakazai, also known as Loi or Loye Mamund, a division of the Mamund clan, are part of the larger Tarkani (ترکاڼي) tribe who are primarily settled in Bajaur Agency, Pakistan, but originally hailed from the Laghman province of Afghanistan. However, it has grown and scattered around to such an extent that it is recognized as tribe of its own.

The Sulaimankhel, or Suleiman Khel, are a Pashtun sub-tribe of the Ghilji tribe of Bettani confederation of Pashtuns. In the early 20th century, the tribe was recognised as generally pastoral.

Bārakzai is the name of a Pashtun tribe from present-day, Kandahar, Afghanistan. '"Barakzai" is a common name among the Pashtuns and it means "son of Barak" in Pashto. There are seven distinct Pashtun tribes named Barakzai, with the Zirak branch of the Durrani tribe being the most important and largest tribe with over 4 million people.

Panni refers to a Pashtun tribe in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Another name for the tribe is Balailzai. Like other Pashtuns, they have Eastern Iranian genetic and ethnolinguistic heritage. They claim descent from Gharghasht, one of Qais Abdur Rashid's sons. Most of them are settled in parts of Pakistan or Afghanistan, such as Karachi, Quetta, Musakhail, Dera Ismail Khan, Mardan, Peshawar, Haripur, Kabul, Tank, Kohat, Sibi, while there are some communities in the United States, United Kingdom, and other Western countries. They were, at one point in time, holding main posts in the Government especially during the rule of Bahlol Lodhi. After his reign ended, they scattered and migrated to various parts of the Indian subcontinent and the Middle East. Some Pannis have also migrated to South India. However, most of them are settled in Pakistan.

Shish Gumbad

Shish Gumbad, also spelt Shisha Gumbad, is a tomb from the Lodhi Dynasty and is thought to have possibly been constructed between 1489 and 1517 CE. The Shish Gumbad houses graves, whose occupants are not unequivocally identifiable. Historians have suggested, the structure might have been dedicated either to an unknown family, which was part of the Lodhi family and of Sikandar Lodi's court, or to Bahlul Lodi himself, who was chief of the Afghan Lodi tribe, founder and Sultan of the Lodi dynasty of the Delhi Sultanate.

References

  1. Malik, Jamal (2008). Islam in South Asia: A Short History. p. 123. ISBN   978-9004168596.
  2. https://www.wdl.org/en/item/3034/#:~:text=The%20History%20of%20the%20Afghans,Jahangir%20(1569%2D1627).
  3. Rasanayagam, Angelo (2005-11-05). Afghanistan: A Modern History . Bloomsbury Academic. ISBN   9781850438571. lodhi dynasty afghan.
  4. Sen, Sailendra (2013). A Textbook of Medieval Indian History. Primus Books. pp. 122–125. ISBN   978-9-38060-734-4.