Lodovico Ferrari

Last updated
Lodovico de Ferrari
Born2 February 1522 (1522-02-02)
Died5 October 1565(1565-10-05) (aged 43)
Nationality Italian
Known for quartic equations
Scientific career
Fields mathematics
Influences Gerolamo Cardano

Lodovico de Ferrari (2 February 1522 5 October 1565) was an Italian mathematician.

Italians nation and ethnic group native to Italy

The Italians are a Romance ethnic group and nation native to the Italian peninsula and its neighbouring insular territories. Most Italians share a common culture, history, ancestry or language. Legally, all Italian nationals are citizens of the Italian Republic, regardless of ancestry or nation of residence and may be distinguished from people of Italian descent without Italian citizenship and from ethnic Italians living in territories adjacent to the Italian Peninsula without Italian citizenship. The majority of Italian nationals are speakers of Italian, or a regional variety thereof. However, many of them also speak another regional or minority language native to Italy; although there is disagreement on the total number, according to UNESCO there are approximately 30 languages native to Italy.

Mathematician person with an extensive knowledge of mathematics

A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics in his or her work, typically to solve mathematical problems.

Contents

Born in Bologna, Italy, Lodovico's grandfather, Bartolomeo de Ferrari, was forced out of Milan to Bologna. Lodovico settled in Bologna, Italy and he began his career as the servant of Gerolamo Cardano. He was extremely bright, so Cardano started teaching him mathematics. Ferrari aided Cardano on his solutions for quadratic equations and cubic equations, and was mainly responsible for the solution of quartic equations that Cardano published. While still in his teens, Ferrari was able to obtain a prestigious teaching post in Rome after Cardano resigned from it and recommended him. Ferrari retired when young at 42 years old, and wealthy. He then moved back to his home town of Bologna where he lived with his widowed sister Maddalena to take up a professorship of mathematics at the University of Bologna in 1565. Shortly thereafter, he died of white arsenic poisoning, according to a legend - because of his sisters. [1]

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GerolamoCardano was an Italian polymath, whose interests and proficiencies ranged from being a mathematician, physician, biologist, physicist, chemist, astrologer, astronomer, philosopher, writer, and gambler. He was one of the most influential mathematicians of the Renaissance, and was one of the key figures in the foundation of probability and the earliest introducer of the binomial coefficients and the binomial theorem in the western world. He wrote more than 200 works on science.

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References

  1. Alan Shuchat; Simon Gindikin. Tales of Mathematicians and Physicists . Springer; 2007. ISBN   978-0-387-48811-0. p. 18.

Further reading

Jayawardene, S. A. (1970–80). "Ferrari, Lodovico". Dictionary of Scientific Biography . 4. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. pp. 586–8. ISBN   978-0-684-10114-9.

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