Lois Wilde

Last updated
Lois Wilde
Born
Edithea Lois Wild

(1907-08-14)August 14, 1907
DiedFebruary 16, 1995(1995-02-16) (aged 87)
Years active1936-1984
Spouse(s)Leslie Major Sherriff (1925-1937) (divorced) (1 child)
William Henry Snow (1938-1940) (divorced) [1]
Gilbert Denton Buck (1954-1986) (his death)
Children1 [2]

Edithia Lois Wilde [3] (August 14, 1907 – February 16, 1995) was an American actress, model, dancer, and beauty contest winner. [4] She was most famous for appearing in B-Western and Action movies, and also known for her appearance in Undersea Kingdom (1936).

Contents

Career

By the time she was 15 years old, Wilde was working as a model and was a ballet dancer at the Metropolitan Opera House. Artists for whom she posed included Howard Chandler Christy, Arnold Genthe, and Renee Prahar. [5]

While dancing at the Metropolitan Opera, she was discovered by Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., who hired her to perform in the 1923 Ziegfeld Follies . During this period, she "was once voted the most beautiful girl in the Follies organization." [6] [7] [8]

Wilde co-starred with Ray Corrigan in Undersea Kingdom (1936) a serial from Republic Pictures. [9] She also co-starred with Gene Autry in 1936's The Singing Cowboy .

Personal life

On March 8, 1925, at eighteen years of age, Wilde married Leslie Major Sherriff, a banjo-player for the Paul Whiteman Band, in Brooklyn, New York. When she became pregnant with her first child, Marjorie, she left the Follies.

After moving from Atlantic City to Beverly Hills, she had a hysterectomy. While recovering in a wheelchair at a hair salon, a man approached her and asked if she had ever been in theater. This inspired her to pursue film roles. [10] [11]

Wilde and Sherriff divorced in 1937. [12] In 1938, she married William Henry Snow, who was the president of a radio recording company. [12]

Partial filmography

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References

  1. "Lois Wilde". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. June 1938. p. 4.
  2. "Dr. Marjorie (Sherriff) Rohde, PHD Obituary". April 2021.
  3. "(photo caption)". The Honolulu Advertiser. Hawaii, Honolulu. International Newsreel. March 29, 1925. p. 36. Retrieved July 5, 2018 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  4. "Actress Lois Wilde to Be Wed". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Missouri, St. Louis. June 1, 1938. p. 4. Retrieved July 4, 2018 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  5. "Lois Wilde, Famous Model at 15, Still Loves Dolls, but Aspires to Be a Bernhardt". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. New York, Brooklyn. December 10, 1922. p. 4. Retrieved July 5, 2018 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  6. "Lois Wilde". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on 5 July 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  7. "Wedding March Soon; Banjo One, for Lois Wilde". Daily News. New York, New York City. March 8, 1925. p. 18. Retrieved July 4, 2018 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  8. "Student of Life". The Sun Chronicle. Attleboro, Massachusetts. November 11, 2001. Retrieved December 6, 2021. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  9. "The Movie Lots Beg to Report". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh. March 18, 1936. p. 12. Retrieved July 5, 2018 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  10. "Musician Weds Follies Girl". Pittsburgh Daily Post. Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh. March 9, 1925. p. 2. Retrieved July 5, 2018 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  11. "Student of Life". The Sun Chronicle. Attleboro, Massachusetts. November 11, 2001. Retrieved December 6, 2021. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  12. 1 2 "Film Actress to Take Vows". The Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. June 1, 1938. p. 3. Retrieved July 4, 2018 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg