Longbridge Deverill

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Longbridge Deverill
Longbridge Deverill.jpg
St Peter and St Paul parish church
Wiltshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Longbridge Deverill
Longbridge Deverill shown within Wiltshire
Population 821 (in 2011) [1]
OS grid reference ST869409
Civil parish
  • Longbridge Deverill
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Warminster
Postcode district BA12
Dialling code 01985
Police Wiltshire
Fire Dorset and Wiltshire
Ambulance South Western
EU Parliament South West England
UK Parliament
Website Parish site
List of places
UK
England
Wiltshire
51°09′54″N2°11′13″W / 51.165°N 2.187°W / 51.165; -2.187 Coordinates: 51°09′54″N2°11′13″W / 51.165°N 2.187°W / 51.165; -2.187

Longbridge Deverill is a village and civil parish about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Warminster in Wiltshire, England. It is on the A350 primary route which connects the M4 motorway and west Wiltshire with Poole, Dorset.

Warminster town and civil parish in western Wiltshire, England

Warminster is a town and civil parish in western Wiltshire, England, by-passed by the A36 and the partly concurrent A350 between Westbury and Blandford Forum. It has a population of about 17,000. The 11th-century Minster Church of St Denys stands near the River Were, which runs through the town and can be seen running through the town park. The name Warminster first occurs in the early 10th century.

Wiltshire County of England

Wiltshire is a county in South West England with an area of 3,485 km2. It is landlocked and borders the counties of Dorset, Somerset, Hampshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire. The county town was originally Wilton, after which the county is named, but Wiltshire Council is now based in the county town of Trowbridge.

A350 road road in England

The A350 is a north-south primary route in southern England, that runs from the M4 motorway in Wiltshire to Poole in Dorset.

Contents

The parish is in the Deverill valley which carries the upper waters of the River Wylye. It includes the small village of Crockerton and the hamlets of Crockerton Green, Fox Holes and Hill Deverill; these settlements are collectively known as the Lower Deverills (the Upper Deverills being the upstream villages of Brixton Deverill, Monkton Deverill and Kingston Deverill).

River Wylye river in Wiltshire, United Kingdom

The River Wylye is a southern England chalk stream, with clear water flowing over gravel. It is popular with anglers for fly fishing. A half-mile stretch of the river and three lakes in Warminster are a local nature reserve.

Brixton Deverill village in the United Kingdom

Brixton Deverill is a small village and civil parish about 4 miles (6.4 km) south of Warminster in Wiltshire, England.

Monkton Deverill village in the United Kingdom

Monkton Deverill is a village and former civil parish in Wiltshire, England, about five miles south of Warminster and four miles northeast of Mere. It stands on the River Wylye and forms part of a group of villages known as the Upper Deverills.

An unnamed tributary of the Wylye rises in the northwest of the parish, forms the man-made Shearwater lake, and flows east through the valley below Crockerton to join the Wylye. [2]

Shearwater (lake) lake in the United Kingdom

Shearwater is a man-made freshwater lake near Crockerton village, about 2 14 miles (3.6 km) southwest of the town of Warminster in Wiltshire, England. The lake is formed from a tributary of the River Wylye.

History

Evidence of Neolithic settlement includes a henge near Long Ivor Farm in the northeast of the parish. [3] A Bronze Age bell barrow stands on a slope of Rook Hill in the southeast. [4] Iron Age settlements include a site on high ground at Cow Down in the east of the parish, where there are foundations of a large circular hut. [5]

Neolithic British Isles refers to the period of British, Irish and Manx history that spanned from circa 4000 to circa 2,500 BCE

The Neolithic British Isles refers to the period of British, Irish and Manx history that spanned from circa 4000 to circa 2,500 BCE. The final part of the Stone Age in the British Isles, it was a part of the greater Neolithic, or "New Stone Age", across Europe.

Henge Type of Neolithic earthwork

There are three related types of Neolithic earthwork that are all sometimes loosely called henges. The essential characteristic of all three is that they feature a ring-shaped bank and ditch, with the ditch inside the bank. Because the internal ditches would have served defensive purposes poorly, henges are not considered to have been defensive constructions. The three henge types are as follows, with the figure in brackets being the approximate diameter of the central flat area:

  1. Henge (> 20 m). The word henge refers to a particular type of earthwork of the Neolithic period, typically consisting of a roughly circular or oval-shaped bank with an internal ditch surrounding a central flat area of more than 20 m (66 ft) in diameter. There is typically little if any evidence of occupation in a henge, although they may contain ritual structures such as stone circles, timber circles and coves. Henge monument is sometimes used as a synonym for henge. Henges sometimes, but by no means always, featured stone or timber circles, and circle henge is sometimes used to describe these structures. The three largest stone circles in Britain are each in a henge. Examples of henges without significant internal monuments are the three henges of Thornborough Henges. Although having given its name to the word henge, Stonehenge is atypical in that the ditch is outside the main earthwork bank.
  2. Hengiform monument (5 – 20 m). Like an ordinary henge except the central flat area is between 5 and 20 m (16–66 ft) in diameter, they comprise a modest earthwork with a fairly wide outer bank. Mini henge or Dorchester henge are sometimes used as synonyms for hengiform monument. An example is the Neolithic site at Wormy Hillock Henge.
  3. Henge enclosure (> 300 m). A Neolithic ring earthwork with the ditch inside the bank, with the central flat area having abundant evidence of occupation and usually being more than 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. Some true henges are as large as this, but lack evidence of domestic occupation. Super henge is sometimes used as a synonym for a henge enclosure. However, sometimes Super henge is used to indicate size alone rather than use, e.g. "Marden henge ... is the least understood of the four British 'superhenges' (the others being Avebury, Durrington Walls and Mount Pleasant Henge".
Bronze Age Britain refers to the period of British history that spanned from c. 2500 until c. 800 BC

Bronze Age Britain is an era of British history that spanned from c. 2500 until c. 800 BC. Lasting for approximately 1,700 years, it was preceded by the era of Neolithic Britain and was in turn followed by the period of Iron Age Britain. Being categorised as the Bronze Age, it was marked by the use of copper and then bronze by the prehistoric Britons, who used such metals to fashion tools. Great Britain in the Bronze Age also saw the widespread adoption of agriculture.

Two Roman roads crossed at Kingston Deverill. A short length of north-south road, probably a section of the route from Bath to Poole, survives on Brimsdown Hill and became part of the boundary with Maiden Bradley parish. [6]

Maiden Bradley village in Wiltshire, England

Maiden Bradley is a village in southwest Wiltshire, England, about 6 miles (10 km) southwest of Warminster and bordering the county of Somerset. The B3092 road between Frome and Mere forms the village street. Bradley House, the seat of the Duke of Somerset, is adjacent to the village.

Land at Longbridge and Crockerton belonged to Glastonbury Abbey from the 10th century. [7] Two estates were recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book at Devrel, with altogether 24 households. [8]

Glastonbury Abbey former Benedictine abbey at Glastonbury

Glastonbury Abbey was a monastery in Glastonbury, Somerset, England. Its ruins, a grade I listed building and scheduled ancient monument, are open as a visitor attraction.

The manor house at Hill Deverill dates from the 16th century and is Grade II* listed. [9] The medieval village of Hill Deverill was to the west of the house. A hollow way, field boundaries and house platforms survive. [10]

James Thynne House James Thynne House, Longbridge Deverill - geograph.org.uk - 1570969.jpg
James Thynne House

In 1655, Sir James Thynne provided a terrace of three two-storey almshouses southeast of Longbridge Deverill church, built in rubble stone with slate roofs. A wooden clock face projects from the gable facing the main road. [11]

In the 19th century a shortage of employment led to emigration to America, Canada or Australia; 181 people left from Longbridge. Pottery was made at Crockerton from locally-dug clay, until the industry declined in the 19th century. Crockerton also had a cloth mill, later a silk mill, which closed in 1894. [7]

Religious sites

The Church of England parish church of Saints Peter and Paul is partly Norman: the three-bay north arcade is from the first half of the 12th century, and the font is from the same period. [12] The church was consecrated by Thomas Becket. The tower and south arcade were built in the 14th century. There was partial rebuilding in the mid-nineteenth century, with various restorations between 1847 and 1860. [13]

It has memorials to the Thynne family including John Thynne (1515–1580) who built Longleat House. [14] The tower has eight bells, the oldest dated 1614. [15] Today the church is a Grade II* listed building [13] and forms part of the Cley Hill benefice. [16]

Holy Trinity Church at Crockerton was built in 1843 as a chapel of ease at the expense of the Dowager Marchioness of Bath, to designs of Wyatt and Brandon. The church was declared redundant in 1973 and is in residential use. [17]

There was a stone church at Hill Deverill in the twelfth century, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. The church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1842, financed by public subscription. It became redundant and was in residential use by 1985. [18] [19]

Education

There was a National School at Longbridge Deverill in the 1840s, and a new building of 1851 accommodated 100 pupils. Owing to falling pupil numbers, the school was closed in March 1970 and pupils transferred to the school at Sutton Veny. [20] The building remains in use as the village hall.

A school was built at Crockerton in 1845 at the expense of the Marquess of Bath, with capacity for 95 pupils. From 1930, children aged 11 and over went to the secondary school at Warminster. The school continues as Crockerton C of E Primary School. [21]

Local government

The parish elects a parish council. It falls within the area of the Wiltshire Council unitary authority, which is responsible for all significant local government functions.

The village falls in the Warminster Without electoral ward. This ward starts in the north at Upton Scudamore, avoids Warminster, then stretches south through Longbridge Deverell to end at Kingston Deverill. The total population of the ward taken at the 2011 census was 4,163. [22]

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Knook village in the United Kingdom

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Great Wishford village in United Kingdom

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Kingston Deverill village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England

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Tytherington, Wiltshire human settlement in United Kingdom

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References

  1. "Wiltshire Community History - Census". Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 28 February 2015.
  2. "Wylye (Headwaters)". Environment Agency - Catchment Data Explorer. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  3. Historic England. "Henge monument 350m north-east of Long Ivor Farm (1010471)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  4. Historic England. "Bell barrow on Rook Hill (1010470)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  5. Historic England. "Iron Age settlement on Cow Down (1016676)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  6. Historic England. "Section of Roman road 760m south west of Lower Barn Farm (1016906)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  7. 1 2 "Longbridge Deverill". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  8. Hill Deverill in the Domesday Book
  9. Historic England. "Manor House, Hill Deverill (1200745)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 28 February 2015.
  10. Historic England. "Hill Deverill medieval settlement (1017295)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  11. Historic England. "Sir James Thynne House (1300662)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  12. "St Peter and St Paul, Longbridge Deverill, Wiltshire". Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture. King's College London. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  13. 1 2 Historic England. "Church of St Peter and St Paul and lych gate (1200661)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  14. "Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Longbridge Deverill". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 28 February 2015.
  15. "Longbridge Deverill". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  16. "Cley Hill Churches" . Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  17. Historic England. "Wylye Hall (1300605)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  18. Historic England. "Church of The Assumption and St Mary (1364334)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  19. "Church of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, Hill Deverill". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  20. "Church of England Controlled School, Longbridge Deverill". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  21. "Crockerton C. of E. Primary School". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
  22. "Warminster Without ward 2011" . Retrieved 17 March 2015.

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