Lord Charles Montagu Douglas Scott

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Lord Charles Montagu Douglas Scott
Born20 October 1839
Died21 August 1911 (1911-08-22) (aged 71)
Allegiance Flag of the United Kingdom.svg United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Years of service1853–1904
Rank Admiral
Commands held HMS Narcissus
HMS Bacchante
HMS Agincourt
Australia Station
Plymouth Command
Battles/wars Crimean War
Second Opium War
Awards Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath

Admiral Lord Charles Thomas Montagu Douglas Scott, GCB (20 October 1839 – 21 August 1911) was a Royal Navy officer who served as Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth.

Contents

Born the fourth son of Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch, Charles Montagu Douglas Scott was educated at Radley College and joined the Royal Navy in 1853. [1] He saw service in the Black Sea in 1855 during the Crimean War. [1] He also took part in the Battle of Fatshan Creek in 1857 during the Second Opium War and served with the Naval Brigade during the Indian Mutiny of 1857. [1]

He was given command of HMS Narcissus in 1875, HMS Bacchante in 1879 and HMS Agincourt in 1885. [1] In 1887 became he became Captain of Chatham Dockyard and then in 1889 he was made Commander of the Australia Station. [1] His last appointment was as Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth in 1900. [1] He retired in 1904. [1]

He was advanced to a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath (GCB) in the November 1902 Birthday Honours list. [2] [3]

He lived at Boughton House near Kettering in Northamptonshire. [1]

Family

In 1883 he married Ada Mary Ryan; [4] they went on to have two sons. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "Lord Charles Montagu Douglas Scott". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
  2. "Birthday Honours". The Times (36921). London. 10 November 1902. p. 10.
  3. "No. 27493". The London Gazette (Supplement). 7 November 1902. pp. 7161–7163.
  4. "Duke of Buccleuch". Cracrofts Peerage.
Military offices
Preceded by
Henry Fairfax
Commander-in-Chief, Australia Station
18891892
Succeeded by
Nathaniel Bowden-Smith
Preceded by
Sir Henry Fairfax
Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth
19001902
Succeeded by
Sir Lewis Beaumont