Lord President of the Court of Session

Last updated
Lord President of the
Court of Session
and
Lord Justice General
of Scotland
Logo of the lord president.svg
Incumbent
Lord Carloway

since 18 December 2015
Style The Right Honourable
Appointer Monarch on the advice of the First Minister
Term length Life tenure with compulsory retirement at 75
Inaugural holder Alexander Mylne, Abbot of Cambuskenneth
Formation 1532
Deputy Lord Justice Clerk
Salary £222,862 (Salary Group 1.1)
Website Roles and Jurisdiction | Judicial Office for Scotland

The Lord President of the Court of Session and Lord Justice General is the most senior judge in Scotland, the head of the judiciary, and the presiding judge of the College of Justice, the Court of Session, and the High Court of Justiciary. The Lord President holds the title of Lord Justice General of Scotland and the head of the High Court of Justiciary ex officio , as the two offices were combined in 1836. The Lord President has authority over any court established under Scots law, except for the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom and the Court of the Lord Lyon.

Judge official who presides over court proceedings

A judge is a person who presides over court proceedings, either alone or as a part of a panel of judges. The powers, functions, method of appointment, discipline, and training of judges vary widely across different jurisdictions. The judge is supposed to conduct the trial impartially and, typically, in an open court. The judge hears all the witnesses and any other evidence presented by the barristers of the case, assesses the credibility and arguments of the parties, and then issues a ruling on the matter at hand based on his or her interpretation of the law and his or her own personal judgment. In some jurisdictions, the judge's powers may be shared with a jury. In inquisitorial systems of criminal investigation, a judge might also be an examining magistrate.

Scotland Country in Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Sharing a border with England to the southeast, Scotland is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, by the North Sea to the northeast and by the Irish Sea to the south. In addition to the mainland, situated on the northern third of the island of Great Britain, Scotland has over 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

Judiciary of Scotland

The judiciary of Scotland are the judicial office holders who sit in the courts of Scotland and make decisions in both civil and criminal cases. Judges make sure that cases and verdicts are within the parameters set by Scots law, and they must hand down appropriate judgments and sentences. Judicial independence is guaranteed in law, with a legal duty on Scottish Ministers, the Lord Advocate and the Members of the Scottish Parliament to uphold judicial independence, and barring them from influencing the judges through any form of special access.

Contents

The current Lord President of the Court of Session is Lord Carloway, who was appointed to the position on 18 December 2015. They are paid according to Salary Group 1.1 of the Judicial Salaries Scale, which in 2016 was £222,862.

Colin Sutherland, Lord Carloway Scottish judge

Colin John MacLean Sutherland, Lord Carloway,, is a Scottish advocate and judge. He is currently Lord President of the Court of Session and Lord Justice General, the most senior judge of the Supreme Courts of Scotland and head of the Scottish Judiciary.

Remit and jurisdiction

Lord President of the Court of Session

The current Lord President of the Court of Session is Lord Carloway, who was appointed to the position on 18 December 2015. [1] The Lord President is paid according to Salary Group 1.1 of the Judicial Salaries Scale, which in 2016 was £222,862. [2]

Head of the judiciary

As Lord President of the Court of Session and is the most senior judge in Scotland, the head of the judiciary, and the presiding judge of the College of Justice, and the Court of Session. [3] :Section 2(1) Under Section 2(6) of the Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008, the Lord President has authority over the judiciary of any court established under Scots law, except for the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom and the Court of the Lord Lyon.

College of Justice

The College of Justice includes the Supreme Courts of Scotland, and its associated bodies.

Court of Session

The Court of Session is the supreme civil court of Scotland and constitutes part of the College of Justice; the supreme criminal court of Scotland is the High Court of Justiciary. The Court of Session sits in Parliament House in Edinburgh and is both a trial court and a court of appeal. Decisions of the Court can be appealed to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, with the permission of either the Inner House or the Supreme Court. The Court of Session and the local sheriff courts of Scotland have concurrent jurisdiction for all cases with a monetary value in excess of £100,000; the pursuer is given first choice of court. However, the majority of complex, important, or high value cases are brought in the Court of Session. Cases can be remitted to the Court of Session from the sheriff courts, including the Sheriff Personal Injury Court, at the request of the presiding sheriff. Legal aid, administered by the Scottish Legal Aid Board, is available to persons with little disposable income for cases in the Court of Session.

Scots law hybrid legal system of Scotland, containing civil law and common law elements

Scots law is the legal system of Scotland. It is a hybrid or mixed legal system containing civil law and common law elements, that traces its roots to a number of different historical sources. Together with English law and Northern Irish law, it is one of the three legal systems of the United Kingdom.

References in this section to the Scottish judiciary are references to the judiciary of any court established under the law of Scotland (other than the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom).
Section 2(5), Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008 [3] :Section 2(5)

The Scottish Land Court, which until 1 April 2017 was administered separately, was transferred to the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service. [4] The 2008 act states:

Scottish Land Court

The Scottish Land Court is a Scottish court of law based in Edinburgh with subject-matter jurisdiction covering disputes between landlords and tenants relating to agricultural tenancies, and matters related to crofts and crofters. The Scottish Land Court is both a trial court and an appeal court; hearings at first-instance are often heard by a Divisional Court of one of the Agricultural Members advised by the Principal Clerk. Decisions of the Divisional Court can be appealed to the Full Court, which will consist of at least one legally qualified judicial member and the remaining Agricultural Member. Some cases are heard at first-instance by the Full Court, and these cases may be appealed to the Inner House of the Court of Session.

Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service A corporate body with responsibility for the administration of the Courts of Scotland

The Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service (SCTS) is an independent public body which is responsible for the administration of the courts and tribunals of Scotland. The Service is led by a board which is chaired by the Lord President of the Court of Session, and employs over 1000 staff members in the country's 39 sheriff courts, 34 justice of the peace courts, the Court of Session and the High Court of Justiciary, and at the service's headquarters in Edinburgh. The day-to-day administration of the service is the responsibility of its Chief Executive and Executive Directors. The Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service is also responsible for providing administrative services for the Judicial Office for Scotland, the Office of the Public Guardian, the Accountant of Court, the Criminal Courts Rules Council, and the Scottish Civil Justice Council.

The Lord President is the Head of the Scottish Judiciary.
Section 2(1), Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008 [3] :Section 2(1)

The Lord President is supported by the Judicial Office for Scotland which was established on 1 April 2010 as a result of the Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008, and the Lord President chairs the corporate board of the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service. [3] :Schedule 3 The Lord President, and the wider judiciary, is advised on matters relating to the administration of justice by the Judicial Council for Scotland, which is a non-statutory body established in 2007. There had been plans for a statutory judges' council but these plans were abandoned in favour of a non-statutory council convened by the Lord President. [5] [6] [7]

Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008

The Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008 is an Act of the Scottish Parliament passed in October 2008 to reform the courts of Scotland, to give statutory force to judicial independence, and to establish the Lord President of the Court of Session as Head of the Judiciary of Scotland.

Inner House

The Lord President presides over the 1st Division of the Inner House of the Court of Session. [8] The Inner House is the part of the Court of Session which acts as a court of appeal for cases decided the Outer House and Sheriff Appeal Court, and hearing appeals on questions of law from the Sheriff Appeal Court, Scottish Land Court, Court of the Lord Lyon, and the Lands Tribunal for Scotland. [9] [10]

Official Oath

In Scotland the Official Oath is taken before the Lord President of the Court of Session. [11]

Lord Justice General

The Lord President is also the Lord Justice General of Scotland and the head of the High Court of Justiciary ex officio, with the two offices having been combined in 1836.The office of Lord Justice General is derived from the justiciars who were appointed from at least the twelfth century. From around 1567 onwards it was held heritably by the Earl of Argyll until the heritability was resigned to the Crown in 1607. [12] [13]

Officeholders

Justiciars

(called Lord Chief Justices by Scot of Scotstarvet).

Lord Justice-General

FromUntilRemarks
William Graham, 7th Earl of Menteith, 1st Earl of Airth 11 July 16288 November 1633
Sir William Elphinstone23 December 163513 November 1641
Sir Thomas Hope, younger of Kerse 18 November 164123 August 1643
William Cunningham, 8th Earl of Glencairn 13 November 164615 February 1649
John Kennedy, 6th Earl of Cassilis 15 March 16499 August 1651
John Murray, 2nd Earl of Atholl 16 August 166121 May 1675
Alexander Stuart, 5th Earl of Moray 21 May 16755 May 1676
Archibald Primrose, Lord Carrington 5 May 167630 September 1678
George Mackenzie, Lord Tarbat 30 September 16781 June 1680
William Douglas, 3rd Earl of Queensberry 1 June 16801 March 1682
James Drummond, 4th Earl of Perth 1 March 168213 June 1684
George Livingston, 3rd Earl of Linlithgow 13 June 16843 August 1689
Robert Ker, 4th Earl of Lothian 3 August 168915 February 1703
George Mackenzie, 1st Earl of Cromartie 17 October 170423 October 1710
Archibald Campbell, 1st Earl of Ilay, 3rd Duke of Argyll 23 October 171015 April 1761
John Hay, 4th Marquess of Tweeddale 27 June 17619 December 1762
Charles Douglas, 3rd Duke of Queensberry 15 April 176322 October 1778
David Murray, 2nd Earl of Mansfield 23 October 17781794
James Graham, 3rd Duke of Montrose 14 January 179530 December 1836

Lord President

FromUntilRemarks
Alexander Mylne, Abbot of Cambuskenneth15321543 Abbot of Cambuskenneth (1519–1548)
Robert Reid, Bishop of Orkney 15431558 Abbot of Kinloss (1528–1553);
Commendator of Beauly (1531–1553);
Bishop of Orkney (1541–1558)
Henry Sinclair, Bishop of Ross 15581565 Commendator of Kilwinning (1541–1550);
Dean of Glasgow (1550–1561);
Bishop of Ross (1558–1565)
John Sinclair, Bishop of Brechin 15651566Appointed a Lord of Session, 1540;
Bishop of Brechin (1565–1566)
William Baillie, Lord Provand 15661567
James Balfour, Lord Pittendreich 15671593Appointed a Lord of Session, 1561
Alexander Seton, Lord Fyvie 15931604Appointed a Lord of Session, 1586;
Provost of Edinburgh (1598–1608);
Lord Chancellor of Scotland (1604–1622);
Lord High Commissioner to the Parliament of Scotland (1612–1621)
James Elphinstone, 1st Lord Balmerino 16051609Appointed a Lord of Session, 1587;
Secretary of State (1598–1609)
John Preston, Lord Fentonbarns 16091616Appointed a Lord of Session, 1595
Thomas Hamilton, 1st Earl of Melrose 16161625Appointed a Lord of Session, 1592;
Lord Advocate (1595–1596 and 1596–1612);
Lord Clerk Register (1612)
Sir James Skene of Curriehill16261633 Lord Clerk Register (1594–1612);
Appointed a Lord of Session, 1594
Robert Spottiswood, Lord Newabbey 16331646Appointed a Lord of Session, 1622
Sir John Gilmour of Craigmillar 16611671 Commissioner for Edinburghshire (1661–1671)
James Dalrymple, 1st Viscount Stair 16711681Appointed a Lord of Session, 1661;
Commissioner for Wigtownshire (1672–1674, 1678 and 1681–1682)
George Gordon, 1st Earl of Aberdeen 16811682 Commissioner for Aberdeenshire (1669–1674, 1678 and 1681–1682);
Appointed a Lord of Session, 1680;
Lord Chancellor of Scotland (1682–1684)
Sir David Falconer of Newton 16821685Appointed a Lord of Session, 1676;
Commissioner for Forfarshire (1685)
Sir George Lockhart of Carnwath 168531 March 1689Appointed Dean of the Faculty of Advocates, 1672;
Commissioner for Lanarkshire (1681–1682 and 1685–1686)
James Dalrymple, 1st Viscount Stair 28 October 168925 November 1695Appointed a Lord of Session, 1661;
Commissioner for Wigtownshire (1672–1674, 1678 and 1681–1682)
Hew Dalrymple, Lord North Berwick 17 March 169820 June 1737 Commissioner for New Galloway (1690–1702);
Dean of the Faculty of Advocates (1695–1698);
Commissioner for North Berwick (1702–1707)
Duncan Forbes, Lord Culloden 20 June 17374 June 1748 MP for Ayr Burghs (1721–1722);
MP for Inverness Burghs (1722–1737);
Lord Advocate (1725–1737)
Robert Dundas, Lord Arniston the Elder 4 June 174826 August 1753 Solicitor General for Scotland (1717–1720);
Lord Advocate (1720–1725);
MP for Midlothian (1722–1737);
Senator of the College of Justice (1737–1753)
Robert Craigie, Lord Glendoick 22 January 175410 March 1760

MP for Tain Burghs (1742–1747);
Lord Advocate (1742–1746)

Robert Dundas, Lord Arniston the Younger 30 April 176013 December 1787 Solicitor General for Scotland (1742–1746);
Dean of the Faculty of Advocates (1746–1760)
Lord Advocate (1754–1760);
MP for Midlothian (1754–1760)
Thomas Miller, Lord Glenlee 22 December 178727 September 1789 MP for Dumfries Burghs (1761–1766);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1759–1760);
Lord Advocate (1760–1766);
Lord Justice Clerk (1766–1787)
Ilay Campbell, Lord Succoth 26 October 178931 August 1808 Solicitor General for Scotland (1783–1784);
MP for Clyde Burghs (1784–1790);
Lord Advocate (1784–1789)
Robert Blair, Lord Avontoun 31 August 180820 May 1811 Solicitor General for Scotland (1789–1806);
Dean of the Faculty of Advocates (1801–1808)
Charles Hope, Lord Granton 10 October 181120 July 1841 Lord Advocate (1801–1804);
MP for Dumfries Burghs (1802);
MP for Edinburgh (1803–1805);
Lord Justice Clerk (1804–1811)
David Boyle, Lord Boyle 7 October 18415 May 1852 MP for Ayrshire (1807–1811);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1807–1811);
Lord Justice Clerk (1811–1841)
Duncan McNeill, Lord Colonsay 14 May 185225 February 1867 MP for Argyllshire (1843–1851);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1834–1835 & 1841–1842);
Lord Advocate (1842–1846)
John Inglis, Lord Glencorse 25 February 186720 August 1891 MP for Stamford (1858); Solicitor General for Scotland (1852);
Lord Advocate (1852 & 1858);
Lord Justice Clerk (1858–1867)
James Robertson, Lord Robertson 21 September 189121 November 1899 MP for Buteshire (1885–1891);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1885–1886 & 1886–1888);
Lord Advocate (1888–1891); Lord of Appeal in Ordinary (1899–1909)
John Balfour, 1st Baron Kinross 21 November 189922 January 1905 MP for Clackmannan and Kinross (1880–1899);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1880–1881);
Lord Advocate (1881–1885, 1886 & 1892–1895)
Andrew Murray, 1st Baron Dunedin 4 February 190514 October 1913 MP for Buteshire (1891–1905);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1905–1909);
Lord Advocate (1909–1913);
Secretary for Scotland (1903–1905);
Lord of Appeal in Ordinary (1913–1932)
Alexander Ure, 1st Baron Strathclyde 14 October 19131 April 1920 MP for Linlithgowshire (1895–1913);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1891–1892 & 1895–1896);
Lord Advocate (1896–1903)
James Avon Clyde, Lord Clyde 1 April 19201 April 1935 Solicitor General for Scotland (1905);
MP for Edinburgh West (1909–1918)
and Edinburgh North (1918–1920); Lord Advocate (1916–1920)
Wilfred Normand, Lord Normand 1 April 19356 January 1947 MP for Edinburgh West (1931–1935);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1929 & 1931–1933);
Lord Advocate (1933–1935); Lord of Appeal in Ordinary (1947–1953)
Thomas Cooper, Lord Cooper [15] 6 January 194723 December 1954 MP for Edinburgh West (1935–1941);
Solicitor General for Scotland (1935);
Lord Advocate (1935–1941);
Senator of the College of Justice (1941–1954);
Lord Justice Clerk (1947–1954)
James Latham Clyde, Lord Clyde [16] 23 December 195425 April 1972 MP for Edinburgh North (1950–1954); Lord Advocate (1951–1954);
Senator of the College of Justice (1954–1972)
George Emslie, Baron Emslie [17] 25 April 197227 September 1989Dean of the Faculty of Advocates (1965–1970);
Senator of the College of Justice (1970–1989)
David Hope, Baron Hope of Craighead 27 September 19891 October 1996Dean of the Faculty of Advocates (1986–1989);
Senator of the College of Justice (1989–1996);
Lord of Appeal in Ordinary (1996–2009);
Second Senior Law Lord (2009);
Deputy President of the Supreme Court (2009–2013)
Alan Rodger, Baron Rodger of Earlsferry 1 October 199613 November 2001 Solicitor General for Scotland (1989–1992);
Lord Advocate (1992–1995);
Senator of the College of Justice (1995–2001);
Lord of Appeal in Ordinary (2001–2009);
Justice of the Supreme Court (2009–2011)
William Cullen, Baron Cullen of Whitekirk 13 November 20012 December 2005Chairman of the Medical Appeals Tribunals (1977–1986);
Senator of the College of Justice (1986–2005);
Lord Justice Clerk (1997–2001)
Arthur Hamilton, Lord Hamilton 2 December 20058 June 2012Chairman of the Medical Appeals Tribunals (1988–1992);
President of the Pensions Appeal Tribunal in Scotland (1992–1995);
Senator of the College of Justice (1995–2012)
Brian Gill, Lord Gill 8 June 201231 May 2015 Senator of the College of Justice (1994–2015);
Lord Justice Clerk (2001–2012)
Colin Sutherland, Lord Carloway 18 December 2015present Senator of the College of Justice (2000–present);
Lord Justice Clerk (2012–2015)

See also

Related Research Articles

Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales position

The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the Head of the Judiciary of England and Wales and the President of the Courts of England and Wales.

High Court of Justiciary

The High Court of Justiciary is the supreme criminal court in Scotland. The High Court is both a trial court and a court of appeal. As a trial court, the High Court sits on circuit at Parliament House or the former Sheriff Court building in Edinburgh, or in dedicated buildings in Glasgow and Aberdeen. The High Court sometimes sits in various smaller towns in Scotland, where it uses the local sheriff court building. As an appeal court the High Court sits only in Edinburgh.

Sheriff court

A sheriff court is the principal local civil and criminal court in Scotland, with exclusive jurisdiction over all civil cases with a monetary value up to £100,000, and with the jurisdiction to hear any criminal case except treason, murder, and rape which are in the exclusive jurisdiction of the High Court of Justiciary. Though the sheriff courts have concurrent jurisdiction with the High Court over armed robbery, drug trafficking, and sexual offences involving children, the vast majority of these cases are heard by the High Court. Each court serves a sheriff court district within one of the six sheriffdoms of Scotland. Each sheriff court is presided over by a sheriff, who is a legally qualified judge, and part of the judiciary of Scotland.

Lord Justice Clerk

The Lord Justice Clerk is the second most senior judge in Scotland, after the Lord President of the Court of Session.

Courts of Scotland

The courts of Scotland are responsible for administration of justice in Scotland, under statutory, common law and equitable provisions within Scots law. The courts are presided over by the judiciary of Scotland, who are the various judicial office holders responsible for issuing judgments, ensuring fair trials, and deciding on sentencing. The Court of Session is the supreme civil court of Scotland, subject to appeals to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, and the High Court of Justiciary is the supreme criminal court, which is only subject to the authority of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom on devolution issues and human rights compatibility issues.

Sheriff principal

In Scotland a sheriff principal is a judge in charge of a sheriffdom with judicial, quasi-judicial, and administrative responsibilities. Sheriffs principal have been part of the judiciary of Scotland since the 11th century. Sheriffs principal were originally appointed by the Monarch of Scotland, and evolved into a heritable jurisdiction before appointment was again vested in the Crown and the Monarch of the United Kingdom following the passage of the Heritable Jurisdictions (Scotland) Act 1746.

Senator of the College of Justice

The Senators of the College of Justice are judges of the College of Justice, a set of legal institutions involved in the administration of justice in Scotland. There are three types of Senator: Lords of Session ; Lords Commissioners of Justiciary ; and the Chairman of the Scottish Land Court. Whilst the High Court and Court of Session historically maintained separate judiciary, these are now one and the same, and the term, Senator, is almost exclusively used in referring to the judges of these courts.

Inner House

The Inner House is the senior part of the Court of Session, the supreme civil court in Scotland; the Outer House forms the junior part of the Court of Session. It is a court of appeal and a court of first instance. The chief justice is the Lord President, with their deputy being the Lord Justice Clerk, and judges of the Inner House are styled Senators of the College of Justice or Lords of Council and Session. Criminal appeals in Scotland are handled by the High Court of Justiciary sitting as the Court of Appeal.

Extraordinary Lords of Session were lay members of the Court of Session in Scotland from 1532 to 1762, and were part of the historical judiciary of Scotland.

Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland

The Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland is an advisory non-departmental public body of the Scottish Government responsible for making recommendations on appointments to certain offices of the judiciary of Scotland. It was established in June 2002 on a non-statutory, ad-hoc, basis by the Scottish Government, and was given statutory authority by the Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008.

Act of Sederunt

An Act of Sederunt is secondary legislation made by the Court of Session, the supreme civil court of Scotland, to regulate the proceedings of Scottish courts and tribunals hearing civil matters. Originally made under an Act of the Parliament of Scotland of 1532, the modern power to make Acts of Sederunt is largely derived from the Courts Reform (Scotland) Act 2014. Since 2013, draft Acts have also been prepared by the Scottish Civil Justice Council and submitted to the Court of Session for approval.

Act of Adjournal

An Act of Adjournal is secondary legislation made by the High Court of Justiciary, the supreme criminal court of Scotland, to regulate the proceedings of Scottish courts hearing criminal matters. Now primarily derived from the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995, the original power to create Acts of Adjournal is derived from an Act of the Parliament of Scotland of 1672. Before promulgation, Acts of Adjournal are reviewed and may be commented upon by the Criminal Courts Rules Council.

Sheriff Appeal Court

The Sheriff Appeal Court is court in Scotland that hears appeals from summary criminal proceedings in the sheriff courts and justice of the peace courts, and hears appeals on bail decisions made in solemn proceedings in the sheriff court. The Sheriff Appeal Court also hears appeals in civil cases from the sheriff courts, including the Sheriff Personal Injury Court.

Scottish Sentencing Council

The Scottish Sentencing Council is an advisory non-departmental public body in Scotland that produces sentencing guidelines for use in the High Court of Justiciary, sheriff courts and justice of the peace courts. Judges, sheriffs, and justices of the peace must use the guidelines to inform the sentence they pronounce against a convict, and they must give reasons for not following the guidelines.

References

  1. "Lord Carloway appointed as Lord President - Scotland's most senior judge". BBC News. British Broadcasting Corporation. 18 December 2015. Archived from the original on 25 April 2017. Retrieved 20 April 2017.
  2. "Ministry of Justice Salary Scales from 1 April 2016" (PDF). gov.uk. Ministry of Justice. 1 April 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on 25 April 2017. Retrieved 5 April 2017.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Scottish Parliament. Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008 as amended (see also enacted form ), from legislation.gov.uk .
  4. Scottish Parliament. The Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008 (Scottish Land Court) Order 2017 as made, from legislation.gov.uk .
  5. "Strengthening Judicial Independence in a Modern Scotland - Chapter 4 - Judges' Council". www.gov.scot. The Scottish Government. 8 February 2006. Archived from the original on 4 April 2017. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
  6. "Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Bill - Policy Memorandum" (PDF). parliament.scot. The Scottish Parliament. 30 January 2008. p. 7. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 April 2017. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
  7. "Constitution of the Judicial Council for Scotland" (PDF). judiciary-scotland.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. 2007. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 3 April 2017. The Judicial Council for Scotland (“the Council”) is a body constituted for the purpose of providing information and advice to— (a) the Lord President of the Court of Session (“the Lord President”); and (b) the judiciary of Scotland, on matters relevant to the administration of justice in Scotland.
  8. "About the Court of Session". www.scotcourts.gov.uk. Scottish Courts and Tribunal Service. Archived from the original on 14 March 2017. Retrieved 2 April 2017. The Inner House is in essence the appeal court, though it has a small range of first instance business. It is divided into the First and the Second Divisions, of equal authority, and presided over by the Lord President and the Lord Justice Clerk respectively.
  9. "Court of Session Act 1988". Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The National Archives. 1988 (36): V. Archived from the original on 21 April 2017. Retrieved 20 April 2017.
  10. Scottish Government (6 February 2014). Policy Memorandum, Courts Reform (Scotland) Bill (PDF) (Report). Scottish Parliament. Archived (PDF) from the original on 21 April 2017. Retrieved 20 April 2017.
  11. "Schedule, Promissory Oaths Act 1868". Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The National Archives. 72: Schedule. 1868. Archived from the original on 21 April 2017. Retrieved 20 April 2017. The oath as to England is to be tendered by the Clerk of the Council, and taken in presence of Her Majesty in Council, or otherwise as Her Majesty shall direct. The oath as to Scotland is to be tendered by the Lord President of the Court of Session at a sitting of the Court.
  12. "Section 18, Court of Session Act 1830", Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 69, p. 18, 1830-07-23, Office of lord justice general to devolve on lord president.
  13. Lundy, Darryl (2013). "Colin Campbell, 3rd Earl of Argyll | Person Page". thepeerage.com. Lundy Consulting Ltd. Archived from the original on 21 April 2017. Retrieved 20 April 2017. Colin Campbell, 3rd Earl of Argyll... He held the office of High Justiciar [Scotland] in July 1514.
  14. https://archive.org/stream/scotspeeragefoun03pauluoft#page/172/mode/2up Archived 11 April 2016 at the Wayback Machine .
  15. "No. 16401". The Edinburgh Gazette . 7 January 1947. p. 7.
  16. "No. 17246". The Edinburgh Gazette . 28 December 1954. p. 687.
  17. "No. 19080". The Edinburgh Gazette . 17 March 1972. p. 241.