Lou Criger

Last updated
Lou Criger
Lou Criger Baseball.jpg
Catcher
Born:(1872-02-03)February 3, 1872
Elkhart, Indiana
Died: May 14, 1934(1934-05-14) (aged 62)
Tucson, Arizona
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 21, 1896, for the Cleveland Spiders
Last MLB appearance
June 3, 1912, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Batting average .221
Home runs 11
Runs batted in 342
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Louis Criger (February 3, 1872 – May 14, 1934) was a Major League Baseball catcher with the Cleveland Spiders, St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Browns and the New York Highlanders between 1896 and 1912.

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Catcher defensive position in baseball and softball played behind home plate, facing the field

Catcher is a position for a baseball or softball player. When a batter takes his/her turn to hit, the catcher crouches behind home plate, in front of the (home) umpire, and receives the ball from the pitcher. In addition to this primary duty, the catcher is also called upon to master many other skills in order to field the position well. The role of the catcher is similar to that of the wicket-keeper in cricket, but in cricket, wicketkeepers are increasingly known for their batting abilities.

The Cleveland Spiders were a Major League Baseball team which played between 1887 and 1899 in Cleveland, Ohio. The team played at National League Park from 1889 to 1890 and at League Park from 1891 to 1899, being disbanded along with three other teams after a travesty of a season in which the team had a horrific 20-134 won-lost record most closely approached by the 1962 New York Mets.

Criger became the first Opening Day catcher in Boston American League franchise's history. A catcher for most of Cy Young's 511 victories, he also caught every inning for eight games with Boston in the first-ever World Series in 1903, helping his team win the championship.

Cy Young American baseball player

Denton True "Cy" Young was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. During his 22-season baseball career (1890–1911), he pitched for five different teams. Young established numerous pitching records, some of which have stood for over a century. Young compiled 511 wins, which is most in Major League history and 94 ahead of Walter Johnson, second on the list. Young was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937. One year after Young's death, the Cy Young Award was created to honor each previous season's best pitcher.

The World Series is the annual championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB) in North America, contested since 1903 between the American League (AL) champion team and the National League (NL) champion team. The winner of the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff, and the winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy. As the series is played during the fall season in North America, it is sometimes referred to as the Fall Classic.

1903 World Series baseball championship series, officially the 1st rendition of Major League Baseballs annual finale

The 1903 World Series was the first modern World Series to be played in Major League Baseball. It matched the American League (AL) champion Boston Americans against the National League (NL) champion Pittsburgh Pirates in a best-of-nine series, with Boston prevailing five games to three, winning the last four.

In a 16-season career, he batted .221 with 11 home runs and 342 RBIs. Criger stole 58 career bases and scored 337 runs. He had 709 career hits in 3202 at bats.

Batting average (baseball)

In baseball, the batting average (BA) is defined by the number of hits divided by at bats. It is usually reported to three decimal places and read without the decimal: A player with a batting average of .300 is "batting three-hundred." If necessary to break ties, batting averages could be taken beyond the .001 measurement. In this context, a .001 is considered a "point," such that a .235 batter is 5 points higher than a .230 batter.

Home run in baseball, a 4-base hit, often by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles without 1st touching the ground; inside-the-park home runs—where the batter reaches home safely while the ball is in play—are possible but rare

In baseball, a home run is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles without first touching the ground or running to home plate and scoring a point, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field.

Stolen base

In baseball, a stolen base occurs when a runner advances to a base to which he is not entitled and the official scorer rules that the advance should be credited to the action of the runner. The umpires determine whether the runner is safe or out at the next base, but the official scorer rules on the question of credit or blame for the advance under Rule 10.

Though never a major star, Criger received votes for the Hall of Fame in four BBWAA elections. He garnered as much as eight percent of the vote.

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References

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